Alice Wright

Alice Wright
Appalachian State University | ASU · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

27
Publications
3,178
Reads
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215
Citations
Introduction
I am an anthropological archaeologist with a focus on the indigenous landscapes of Eastern North America, particularly the southern Appalachian Mountains, where I co-direct the New River Headwaters Archaeological Project and the Linville Gorge Archaeological Survey. I am also a contributor to the Junaluska Community Archaeology Project, a community-based heritage initiative to illuminate the history of the historically Black community of Boone, North Carolina.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Appalachian State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Archaeologies of Landscape (w/senior capstone); Prehistory of the Southern Appalachians (w/fieldtrips); Archaeology and the Human Past; North American Archaeology; Mesoamerican Cultures
June 2014 - present
Appalachian State University
Position
  • Archaeologist
Description
  • Multidisciplinary investigation of monumental landscapes at Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park, Tennessee. Collaboration with Sewanee University of the South, Bryn Mawr College, the University of Tennessee, and Washington University in St. Louis.
June 2013 - August 2013
University of Michigan
Position
  • Graduate Student Instructor (Instructor of Record)
Description
  • Shamans, Shrines, and Sacrifice: Archaeology of Religion in the Americas
Education
August 2007 - April 2014
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Anthropology
August 2003 - April 2007
Wake Forest University
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
The origins and histories of mounds are perennial topics of investigation in the American Southeast, underscoring the centrality of these monuments to the social lives and cosmologies of Indigenous southeastern peoples. Drawing upon theories of persistent place and path dependence, we argue that a focus on the pre-mound histories of mound sites can...
Article
The Late Woodland (ca. AD 800–1500) was a time of socioeconomic and environmental change in the Appalachian Summit. Changing climatic conditions and the introduction of maize agriculture made permanent settlement in these high-elevation mountain landscapes possible for the first time. We adopt a settlement ecology approach to examine how Late Woodla...
Article
Full-text available
The archaeological record of the American Eastern Woodlands has been the subject of research on the origins and organization of complex societies for decades. Much of this research, ultimately grounded in political-economic theories of accumulation, underscores how foraging, horticultural, and agricultural societies manifested complexity in differe...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeologists often use near-surface geophysics or LiDAR-derived topographic imagery in their research. However, rarely are the two integrated in a way that offers a robust understanding of the complex historical palimpsests embedded within a social landscape. In this paper we present an integrated aerial and terrestrial remote sensing program at...
Book
Full-text available
From the University of Alabama Press: Originally coined in the context of twentieth-century business affairs, the term glocalization describes how the global circulation of products, services, or ideas requires accommodations to local conditions, and, in turn, how local conditions can significantly impact global markets and relationships. Garden C...
Poster
Full-text available
Brief introduction to the New River Archaeological Project, set to begin fieldwork in May 2019, for a public/interdisciplinary audience.
Article
Full-text available
In 2014, the Southeastern Archaeological Conference (SEAC) conducted a sexual harassment survey of its membership. The survey's goal was to investigate whether sexual harassment had occurred among its members, and if so, to document the rate and demographics of harassment. Our findings include a high (66%) level of harassment, primarily among women...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past several years, we have seen many attacks on publicly funded and mandated archaeology in the United States. These attacks occur at the state level, where governors and state legislatures try to defund or outright eliminate state archaeological programs and institutions. We have also seen several attacks at the federal level. Some membe...
Article
Full-text available
During the Middle Woodland period, from 200 BC to AD 600, southeastern societies erected monuments, interacted widely, and produced some of the most striking material culture of the pre-Columbian era, but these developments are often overshadowed by the contemporaneous florescence of Hopewell culture in Ohio. I argue that the demonstrable material...
Article
In the United States, archaeological sites on private lands have few legal protections, and are thus at risk of damage or destruction. To alleviate these risks, archaeologists must engage thoughtfully with private property owners and develop strategies to promote site stewardship. In this article, I identify the resident community - those people wh...
Article
Ritual items made of thin mica sheet are among the most spectacular of the special objects from the Hopewell sites of the Ohio Valley. Hitherto it has generally been believed that the mica was imported in raw material form from sources in the Appalachian Summit and cut into shape in the Hopewell core. Recent excavations at Garden Creek, a ritual en...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Middle Woodland geometric enclosures are among the most complex earthen monuments ever built in Eastern North America. Well-known 19th century maps have long provided archaeologists with a view of their shape, size, and scope, in their final forms. However, because relatively few of these enclosures have been systematically excavated, their early l...
Article
Geophysical data have the potential to significantly contribute to archaeological research projects when effectively integrated with more traditional methods. Although pre-existing archaeological questions about a site may be answered using geophysical methods, beginning an investigation with an extensive geophysical survey can assist in understand...
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Woodland period in eastern North America witnessed a florescence of monumental architecture and material exchange linked to widespread networks of ritual interaction. Although these networks encompassed large geographic areas and persisted for several centuries, extant archaeological models have tended to characterize Middle Woodland int...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In September 2014 SEAC sponsored a sexual harassment survey of its membership. Goals of the survey were to identify frequency and types of sexual harassment in field situations and identify consequences of such incidences for perpetrators and victims. Specifically, the survey was designed to identify if victims of sexual harassment had suffered adv...
Article
Full-text available
During the Middle Woodland period (ca. 300 B.C. ??? A.D. 500), indigenous people across eastern North America participated ??? to varying degrees ??? in long distance networks of material and ideological exchange. This study examines the relationship between these interregional interactions and the emergence monumental architecture among groups of...
Book
The Early and Middle Woodland periods (1000 BCE-500 CE) were remarkable for their level of culture contact and interaction in pre-Columbian North America. This volume, featuring case studies from Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama, and Tennessee, sheds new light on the various approaches to the study of the dynamic and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The distributions of Middle Woodland craft goods and raw materials across the Southeast attest to participation in interregional networks of material and ideological exchange, including the Hopewell Interaction Sphere. Existing models of these networks vary: some emphasize the role of Southeastern gateway centers in Hopewell production and exchange...
Conference Paper
Best known for its monumental architecture and an assemblage of Hopewellian artifacts, the Middle Woodland component (ca. 300 BC – AD 800) of the Garden Creek site has recently yielded chipped stone debitage from a variety of off-mound contexts. Our ongoing examination of this assemblage focuses on the quantities of debitage excavated, raw material...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Small but notable exotic artifact assemblages from Middle Woodland sites across the southern Appalachians have long implicated local inhabitants in the Hopewell Interaction Sphere. Using these data, archaeologists have explored the economic and ceremonial relationships that linked these communities to groups in the Midwest. Recent geophysical surve...

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
Clarify the roles of local traditions and inter-regional interaction in the emergence of monumental architecture in the Appalachian Summit during the Middle Woodland period.
Project
Archaeological investigations of the historical ecology of the headwaters of the New River in northwestern North Carolina