Alfredo Cramerotti

Alfredo Cramerotti
University of South Wales · Department of Film, Photography and New Media

Master of Arts

About

7
Publications
1,868
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25
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Alfredo Cramerotti is Director of MOSTYN, Wales UK and Adviser to the British Council Visual Arts Acquisition Committee and the Art Institutions of the 21st Century Foundation. He holds a PhD in Communication Design and Photography and has had over 200 texts published on art, media and curatorial practice, contributing to a large number of books, catalogues and monographs and online journals, as well as being Editor-in-Chief of the Critical Photography book series (Intellect Books).
Additional affiliations
March 2012 - December 2017
University of South Wales
Position
  • PhD Research Scholar, European Centre for Photographic Research

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
In 2001, artists Broomberg and Chanarin documented a day in the Iraq war. The result was a visual yet non-descript narrative, achieved with light and presence; a physical documentation of their journey titled The Day Nobody Died. In 1968 photojournalist Eddie Adams captured Saigon Execution in Vietnam, also a war-time image but with the lens of rep...
Article
Full-text available
The most obvious and ubiquitous – and important – realities are often the ones that are the hardest to see and talk about. How many pictures have we been included in, triggered or generated today? We are all implicated in photography whether we like it or not, and whether we associate this visual language with a precise function or we use it to sha...
Article
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Article
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The 2012 Alternativa artistic project in Gdánsk emphasized the need for the return to material stability, approaching the field of the political from the perspective of a tactile and concrete point of view. Rather than absorbing the artistic positions, or the theories underpinning them, one could approach the exhibition as a process for the apprais...
Book
Taking as its starting point the notion of photocinema—or the interplay of the still and moving image the photographs, interviews, and critical essays in this volume explore the ways in which the two media converge and diverge, expanding the boundaries of each in interesting and unexpected ways. The book's innovative approach to film and photograph...
Book
Full-text available
Addressing a growing area of focus in contemporary art, Aesthetic Journalism investigates why contemporary art exhibitions often consist of interviews, documentaries, and reportage. Art theorist and critic Alfredo Cramerotti traces the shift in the production of truth from the domain of the news media to that of art and aestheticism – a change that...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale temporary art exhibitions such as biennials present special characteristics which in turn illuminate broader questions of art practice, curatorship and cultural management, as well as cultural and social affect. This article considers the third Berlin biennale for contemporary art, focusing its initial discussion on questions of exhibit...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Hyperimage is a visual exhibition on the status of image-making and made-by-image in our lives, and the continual reinterpretation of our visual landscape. It attempts to make sense of the “photography in excess” of the media age, and considers how visual aspects of contemporary culture are increasingly prominent. The digital environment has turned photography into the visual medium of or time. It is one of the principle ways we constitute our knowledge and ultimately ourselves as individuals and communities. We can call “hyperimages” those images not anchored in any way to their sources or origins that come in an out of our screens to affect our real decisions, opinions and existence, only to return to the network and pop up somewhere else at some other times for other people. The hyperimage is a sort of visual Esperanto, a language that is neither written nor spoken, but visual and universal. If, and how, we are able to learn the language and use it properly, is one of the questions the exhibitions asks.