Alexandra de Pleijt

Alexandra de Pleijt
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Department of Economics

PhD Economic History

About

20
Publications
5,844
Reads
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311
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
294 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
Utrecht University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2016 - present
The London School of Economics and Political Science
Position
  • Professor
September 2012 - August 2015
Utrecht University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
We test various hypotheses about the causes of the Little Divergence, using new data and focusing on trends in GDP per capita and urbanization. We find evidence that confirms the hypothesis that human capital formation was the driver of growth, and that institutional changes (in particular the rise of active Parliaments) were closely related to eco...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the effect of technical change on human capital formation during England's Industrial Revolution. Using the number of steam engines installed by 1800 as a synthetic indicator of technological change and occupational statistics to measure working skills (using HISCLASS), we establish a positive correlation between the use of steam engines...
Article
Full-text available
Labour market engagement by women is an important determinant of female autonomy that may also affect their demographic behaviour. In order to bring about the conditions for the female autonomy that characterized the European marriage pattern (in which women had a say in the decision about when and whom they marry), women needed to earn a decent wa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Estimates of capital formation and the stock of capital in Britain are provided for the period 1270-1870 and used to analyse economic growth. (1) We chart the growing importance of fixed relative to working capital, the declining importance of land and the growth of net overseas assets. (2) Kaldor's stylised facts of a rising capital-labour ratio a...
Article
Does higher female autonomy increase human capital formation? To find out, we employ novel data on numeracy as a proxy for human capital and the demographic indicator female age at marriage as a measure for female autonomy for 27 countries and 153 regions in Europe between 1500 and 1900. Our empirical analysis shows that countries and regions with...
Article
Nederland moet de gewone vermogensbelasting weer invoeren, zodat de 'haves' weer naar vermogen gaan bijdragen aan dit land, aldus de economisch historici Jan Luiten van Zanden en Sandra de Pleijt.
Article
Vrouwen zijn nog altijd minder vaak economisch zelfstandig dan mannen. Ruim drie op de vijf vrouwen zijn economisch zelfstandig, tegenover vier op de vijf mannen. In dit artikel wordt de Enquête Beroepsbevolking gebruikt om te onderzoeken welke factoren er aan dit verschil bijdragen.
Article
This paper charts the growth trajectory of grammar schools in England at the county level between 1270 and 1700 to shed new light on the long-term development of the economy in the centuries before the Industrial Revolution. The evidence on schooling shows that there were two “educational revolutions”. The first occurred in the period between the B...
Chapter
This chapter develops an interrelated set of hypotheses about the links between gender relations, family systems and economic development in Eurasia. First, we briefly discuss a number of ideas from the recent literature about the links between gender relations and economic development. Second, we suggest a measure of historic gender relations via...
Research
Full-text available
Many countries did not accumulate sufficient human capital to be successful, because they did not make use of the potential of the female half of their population. Other countries did the opposite and became “superstars” and pioneers in long-term economic development. This view is supported by studying female autonomy and numeracy indicators of 27...
Research
Full-text available
It is generally acknowledged that the degree to which women participate in labour markets and how they are remunerated are important determinants of female autonomy that may also affect their demographic behaviour. Such links have been discussed in the literature about the "European Marriage Pattern" (EMP). In order to bring about the conditions fo...
Research
Full-text available
We examine the effect of technical change on human capital formation during England’s Industrial Revolution. Using the number of steam engines installed by 1800 as a synthetic indicator of technological change, and occupational statistics to measure working skills (using HISCLASS), we establish a positive correlation between the use of steam engine...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, I quantify average years of education present in the English population between 1307 and 1900. The estimates are based on extensive source material on literacy rates, number of primary and secondary schools and enrolment figures. An additional distinction is made on the basis of gender and of level of schooling. The trends in the dat...
Chapter
The British Industrial Revolution is probably the most important event of the last 10,000 years. This chapter reviews some of the more recent literature on this topic. The focus is primarily on the timing and location of the Industrial Revolution. Contributing factors discussed include institutions, culture and human capital, factor prices, consume...
Article
Full-text available
We use HISCLASS to code the occupational titles of over 30,000 English male workers according to the skill content of their work. We then track the evolution of the sampled working skills across three centuries of English history, from 1550 to 1850. We observe a modest rise in the share of ‘high-quality workmen’ deemed necessary by Mokyr and others...
Article
Full-text available
We review different interpretations of the European Marriage Pattern (EMP) and explore how they relate to the discussion of the link between the EMP and economic growth. Recently Dennison and Ogilvie have argued that the EMP did not contribute to growth in Early Modern Europe. We argue that the link between the EMP and economic growth is incorrectl...
Article
Full-text available
Macroeconomic growth models underline the importance of human capital in the process of economic development. This analysis introduces a new proxy for human capital, which is educational attainment, and examines cohesion between education levels and growth for England between 1307 and 1900. The empirical evidence suggests no significant result betw...

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