Alexander Jueterbock

Alexander Jueterbock
Nord University | HIBO · Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture

PhD

About

61
Publications
18,949
Reads
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1,721
Citations
Citations since 2017
39 Research Items
1287 Citations
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Introduction
I am a marine ecologist primarily interested in ecological and evolutionary responses of marine species to environmental change. My work focuses on ecologically important non-model species, including macroalgae and seagrass. Currently, I characterize epigenetic variation in clonal seagrass meadows and its functional role. The main question of the project is: Does epigenetic variation allow for rapid evolutionary change and is thus key to evolutionary success without genetic variation?
Additional affiliations
June 2015 - present
Nord University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2009 - March 2010
Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg
Position
  • Diplom student

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture has become the primary supplier of fish for human consumption, with production increasing every year since 1990 (FAO, 2020). At the same time, up to 89% of the world’s capture fisheries are fully exploited, overexploited, or collapsed. While some fisheries may have increased yields due to climate change in the short term, global fisheri...
Article
Abstract Invasive species can successfully and rapidly colonize new niches and expand ranges via founder effects and enhanced tolerance towards environmental stresses. However, the underpinning molecular mechanisms (i.e., gene expression changes) facilitating rapid adaptation to harsh environments are still poorly understood. The red seaweed Gracil...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Fucus dominates the intertidal and shallow subtidal rocky reefs of the North Atlantic and also is commonly found in the intertidal of the North Pacific. It likely diversified 12.2-2.7 mya into two genetically distinct lineages: Lineage 1 with one species in the North Pacific and two in the North Atlantic; and Lineage 2 found only in the N...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming is one of the most important factors in shaping the spatial distribution and genetic biodiversity of marine organisms worldwide. The northwest Pacific has been broadly illustrated as an essential seaweed diversity hotspot. However, few studies have yet investigated in this region on whether and how past and ongoing climate warming imp...
Preprint
Invasive species can successfully and rapidly colonize new niches and expand ranges via founder effects and enhanced tolerance towards environmental stresses. However, the underpinning molecular mechanisms (i.e., gene expression changes) facilitating rapid adaptation to harsh environments are still poorly understood. The red seaweed Gracilaria verm...
Article
Eucheuma is one of the most important commercial red seaweeds in Southeast Asia, and plays an important role in the global seaweed aquaculture. It may likely exhibit great responses to ocean warming. Here, we used maximum entropy species distribution models (SDMs) to estimate the suitable habitat of Eucheuma denticulatum under present conditions, a...
Article
Full-text available
Most kelp species are of high ecological and economic importance worldwide, but are highly susceptible to rising ocean temperatures due to their sessile lifestyle. Due to interference with reproduction, development and growth, natural kelp forests have vanished in multiple regions after extreme summer heat waves. Further, increasing temperatures ar...
Article
Full-text available
Sargassum thunbergii is a brown macroalga endemic to the northwest Pacific. It plays important ecological roles in the structure and maintenance of coastal marine ecosystems. The bioactive compounds extracted from S. thunbergii have been extensively documented for potential use in anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-tumor, anti-oxidant a...
Article
Full-text available
Due to rising global surface temperatures, Arctic habitats are becoming thermally suitable for temperate species. Whether a temperate species can immigrate into an ice-free Arctic depends on its ability to tolerate extreme seasonal fluctuations in daylength. Thus, understanding adaptations to polar light conditions can improve the realism of models...
Article
Full-text available
Due to rising global surface temperatures, Arctic habitats are becoming thermally suitable for temperate species. Whether a temperate species can immigrate into an ice-free Arctic depends on its ability to tolerate extreme seasonal fluctuations in daylength. Thus, understanding adaptations to polar light conditions can improve the realism of models...
Article
Full-text available
Marine spatial planning that addresses ocean climate-driven change (‘climate-smart MSP’) is a global aspiration to support economic growth, food security and ecosystem sustainability. Ocean climate change (‘CC’) modelling may become a key decision-support tool for MSP, but traditional modelling analysis and communication challenges prevent their br...
Preprint
Full-text available
The sex-dependent regulation of gene expression is considered to be the underlying cause of often extensive, sexually dimorphic traits between males and females. Although the nature and degree of sex-biased gene expression has been well-documented in several animal and plant systems, far less is known about the commonality, conservation, recruitmen...
Article
Seagrasses play a vital role in structuring coastal marine ecosystems, but their distributional range and genetic diversity have declined rapidly over the past decades. In order to improve conservation of seagrass species, it is important to predict how climate change may impact their ranges. Such predictions are typically made with correlative spe...
Article
Full-text available
Marine macrophytes, including seagrasses and macroalgae, form the basis of diverse and productive coastal ecosystems that deliver important ecosystem services. Moreover, western countries increasingly recognize macroalgae, traditionally cultivated in Asia, as targets for a new bio-economy that can be both economically profitable and environmentally...
Preprint
Full-text available
Seagrasses play a vital role in structuring coastal marine ecosystems, but their distributional range and genetic diversity have declined rapidly over the past decades. In order to improve conservation of seagrass species, it is important to predict how climate change may impact their ranges. Such predictions are typically made with correlative spe...
Article
Full-text available
Natural hybridization can play a significant role in evolutionary processes and influence the adaptive diversification and speci-ation of brown seaweeds. However, this phenomenon is as yet unknown in Saccharina kelps. Saccharina angustata and two varieties of Saccharina japonica (S. japonica var. japonica and S. japonica var. diabolica) partly over...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary theory predicts that clonal organisms are more susceptible to extinction than sexually reproducing organisms, due to low genetic variation and slow rates of evolution. In agreement, conservation management considers genetic variation as the ultimate measure of a population's ability to survive over time. However, clonal plants are amon...
Article
Full-text available
Kelp are foundation species threatened by ongoing warming trends and increased harvesting pressure. This emphasizes the need to study genetic structure over various spatial scales to resolve demographic and genetic processes underpinning resilience. Here, we investigate the genetic diversity in the kelp, Laminaria digitata, in previously understudi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evolutionary theory predicts that clonal organisms are more susceptible to extinction than sexually reproducing organisms, due to low genetic variation and slow rates of evolution. In agreement, conservation management considers genetic variation as the ultimate measure of a population’s ability to survive over time. However, clonal plants are amon...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of postglacial range shifts could enhance our understanding of seaweed species’ responses to climate change, and hence facilitate the conservation of natural resources. However, the distribution dynamics and phylogeographic diversification of the commercially and ecologically important kelp Saccharina japonica in the Northwest Pacific (NWP)...
Data
Supplementary Material for "Towards population genomics in non-model species with large genomes: a case study of the marine zooplankton Calanus finmarchicus"
Article
Full-text available
Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies and the development of genome-reduced representation protocols have opened the way to genome-wide population studies in non-model species. However, species with large genomes remain challenging, hampering the development of genomic resources for a number of taxa including marine arthropods. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The spatial distribution of genetic diversity and structure has important implications for conservation as it reveals a species’ strong and weak points with regard to stability and evolutionary capacity. Temporal genetic stability is rarely tested in marine species other than commercially important fishes, but is crucial for the utilit...
Article
Full-text available
Marine macrophytes are the foundation of algal forests and seagrass meadows-some of the most productive and diverse coastal marine ecosystems on the planet. These ecosystems provide nursery grounds and food for fish and invertebrates, coastline protection from erosion, carbon sequestration, and nutrient fixation. For marine macrophytes, temperature...
Poster
Full-text available
Evolutionary theory predicts that low genetic variation reduces a population’s ability to cope with environmental variability and to adapt to changing environments. However, the evolutionary success of big old clones of the seagrass Zostera marina challenges the direct relationship between genetic diversity and adaptation potential. We aim to test...
Article
Populations distributed across a broad thermal cline are instrumental in addressing adap-tation to increasing temperatures under global warming. Using a space-for-time substi-tution design, we tested for parallel adaptation to warm-temperatures along two inde-pendent thermal clines in Zostera marina, the most widely distributed seagrass in the temp...
Article
Full-text available
Rising temperatures are predicted to melt all perennial ice cover in the Arctic by the end of this century, thus opening up suitable habitat for temperate and subarctic species. Canopy-forming seaweeds provide an ideal system to predict the potential impact of climate-change on rocky-shore ecosystems, given their direct dependence on temperature an...
Data
Table S1. Occurrence records of Fucus distichus. Table S2. Sources of grids of the 26 environmental variables. Table S3. Variable selection process. Table S4. Suitable coastlengths for F. distichus. Table S5. Niche identities between F. distichus/and three temperate macroalgal species. Table S6. Environmental conditions at distribution edges o...
Data
Figure S1. Background (pseudo‐absence) sites. Figure S2. Performance of niche models measured by AUC.Test values. Figure S3. Performance of niche models measured by AICc values. Figure S4. Response curves of the four environmental variables that were identified as most important range‐limiting factors.
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses colonized the sea1 on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet2. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains...
Article
Full-text available
It is unclear whether intertidal organisms are ‘preadapted’ to cope with the increase of temperature and temperature variability or if they are currently at their thermal tolerance limits. To address the dichotomy, we focused on an important ecosystem engineer of the Arctic intertidal rocky shores, the seaweed Fucus distichus and investigated therm...
Article
Full-text available
Hybrid zones provide an ideal natural experiment to study the selective forces driving evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. If hybrid offspring are less fit than the parental species, pre-zygotic isolating barriers can evolve and strengthen in response to selection against the hybrids (reinforcement). Four contact zones between the in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Article
Seaweed-dominated communities are predicted to disappear south of 45° latitude on North-Atlantic rocky shores by 2200 because of climate change. The extent of predicted habitat loss, however, could be mitigated if the seaweeds' physiology is sufficiently plastic to rapidly acclimatize to the warmer temperatures. The main objectives of this study we...
Article
Atlantic cod displays a range of phenotypic and genotypic variations, which includes the differentiation into coastal stationary and offshore migratory types of cod that co-occur in several parts of its distribution range and are often sympatric on the spawning grounds. Differentiation of these ecotypes may involve both historical separation and ad...
Article
Full-text available
The utility of species distribution models for applications in invasion and global change biology is critically dependent on their transferability between regions or points in time, respectively. We introduce two methods that aim to improve the transferability of presence-only models: density-based occurrence thinning and performance-based predicto...
Data
Full-text available
Model surveying results indicating qualitatively similar results when analyses are carried out with global or regional backgrounds. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
The North-Atlantic has warmed faster than all other ocean basins and climate change scenarios predict sea surface temperature isotherms to shift up to 600 km northwards by the end of the 21st century. The pole-ward shift has already begun for many temperate seaweed species that are important intertidal foundation species. We asked the question: Whe...
Article
Detecting natural selection in wild populations is a central challenge in evolutionary biology and genomic scans are an important means of detecting allele frequencies that deviate from neutral expectations among marker loci. We used nine anonymous and 15 EST-linked microsatellites, 362 AFLP loci, and several neutrality tests, to identify outlier l...
Article
G(ST)-values and its relatives (F(ST)) belong to the most used parameters to define genetic differences between populations. Originally, they were developed for allozymes with very low number of alleles. Using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers it was often puzzling that G(ST)-values were very low but statistically significant. In their pape...

Questions

Questions (5)
Question
DNA methylation represents a covalent bond between a methyl group and a cytosine. To capture the DNA methylation patterns at a certain point in time, is it sufficient to dry the plant tissue or is it necessary to flash-freeze it in liquid nitrogen?
Question
Are there alternative ways than estimations from Chla measurements?
Question
Does anybody know of a source where sea ice thickness grids for 6.000 an 21.000 years ago can be downloaded for modeling? I only find resouces for land ice thickness but not sea ice.
Question
Yeast, Drosophila and Caenorhabditis have extremely low levels of DNA methylation. One of the major roles of DNA methylation are to protect the genome against transposable elements. If this protection is not given, I would expect that genome evolution by the insertion of transposable elements is more likely, particularly under stress. I can't find any study that compares the evolvability of species with DNA methylation and without DNA methylation. Ideas and literature are welcome.
Question
I would like to avoid grinding the tissue with liquid nitrogen and a pestle and mortar. Are there other ways to start RNA extraction from plant tissue stored in RNA later? Can it be freeze-dried when taking it out of RNAlater and then grinded with beads?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Objectives: 1. Connect knowledge providers presenting expertise in macroalgae biology with stakeholders in macroalgae aquaculture from Norway and Portugal to stimulate research and development (R&D) for a future-proof economically successful and environmentally sustainable production of macroalgal biomass in both countries. 2. Identify research gaps and questions that need to be addressed to bring the sustainable development of macroalgae farming beyond the current state of the art with the ultimate goal to develop macroalgae as a socially and environmentally sustainable aquaculture resource in Norway and Portugal. Expected results: 1. A research proposal focusing on the realization of socially and environmentally sustainable macroalgae aquaculture. The proposal can be targeted in slightly varying forms/parts to different funding agencies with suitable calls in the fields of ‘blue growth’, ‘sustainable use of marine resources, ‘biotechnological applications’, but also ‘ecological management and restoration’ (e.g. EEA, Horizon Europe, ERA-BIODIVERSA, BlueBiovalue, EU’s LIFE program calls, and national calls such as from the Norwegian Research council (Havbruk and Marinforsk programmes), and the Foundation for Science and Technology. 2. A peer-reviewed scientific Perspectives/Opinion paper, co-authored by all partners, that highlights research gaps and proposes steps to move beyond the current state of the art in the development of European macroalgae culture to a profitable industry in a socially and environmentally sustainable manner. The paper(s) will be published Open Access in an appropriate journal, such as Algal Research (IF: 4.0), Frontiers in Marine Science (IF 3.7), or Aquaculture reports (IF: 2.3). 3. Public awareness will be raised through different media channels to the ecosystem services of natural kelp forests and the role of macroalgae cultivation in the green shift of the aquaculture industry.
Project
The project will look at the ‘speciation continuum’ in the brown algal genus, Fucus and will identify molecular mechanisms of speciation in two sister species. Hybrid zones between the two species Fucus distichus and Fucus serratus provide a unique situation to examine mechanisms of reinforcement, adaptation and speciation at a molecular level, in a non-model marine algal species. I will use Next-generation sequencing of transcriptome libraries to better understand the molecular basis of speciation in these ecologically important marine macroalgae and by studying speciation in Fucus we can better understand the influence of speciation on both the patterns of biodiversity and species adaptation.
Project
The central aim of this proposal is to understand the role of epigenetic variation in the phenotypic plasticity of Zostera marina, a partially clonal marine plant with an ecological key role, thus filling fundamental knowledge gaps in the role of epigenetic versus genetic diversity as drivers of ecosystem resilience. We focus on DNA methylation, the best studied mechanism in the context of heritable epigenetic variation. More specifically, we aim to: Identify the presence and drivers of epigenetic diversity within Zostera marina clones. Assess the effect of epigenetic variation on heat stress performance of Zostera marina. Estimate the heritability of epigenetic variation within Zostera marina meadows.