Alexa Fredston

Alexa Fredston
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey | Rutgers · Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
4,020
Reads
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191
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Education
August 2008 - June 2012
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Model predicts a mass extinction event in the oceans if climate change is uncurbed
Article
Full-text available
Coastal environments globally are experiencing an increase in the influence and impact of human activities. Assessing the amount of modification that anthropogenic impacts cause to coastal ecosystems is imperative for characterizing and predicting habitat loss and degradation, and prioritizing conservation measures. However, as the spatial scale an...
Article
Understanding the dynamics of species range edges in the modern era is key to addressing fundamental biogeographic questions about abiotic and biotic drivers of species distributions. Range edges are where colonization and extirpation processes unfold, and so these dynamics are also important to understand for effective natural resource management...
Article
Full-text available
Topical application of extracellular calreticulin (eCRT), an ER chaperone protein, in animal models enhances wound healing and induces tissue regeneration evidenced by epidermal appendage neogenesis and lack of scarring. In addition to chemoattraction of cells critical to the wound healing process, eCRT induces abundant neo‐dermal extracellular mat...
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Full-text available
Ocean acidification is a global issue with particular regional significance in the California Current System, where social, economic, and ecological impacts are already occurring. Although ocean acidification is a concern that unifies the entire West Coast region, managing for this phenomenon at a regional scale is complex and further complicated b...
Article
Species around the world are shifting their ranges in response to climate change. To make robust predictions about climate‐related colonizations and extinctions, it is vital to understand the dynamics of range edges. This study is among the first to examine annual dynamics of cold and warm range edges, as most global change studies average observat...
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Full-text available
Many anthropogenic stressors broadly inflict mortality or reduce fecundity, including habitat destruction, pollution, climate change, invasive species, and multispecies harvesting. Here, we show-in four analytical models of interspecies competition-that broadly inflicted stressors disproportionately cause competitive exclusions within groups of eco...
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1.Pollution from land‐based run‐off threatens coastal ecosystems and the services they provide, detrimentally affecting the livelihoods of millions people on the world's coasts. Planning for linkages among terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems can help managers mitigate the impacts of land‐use change on water quality and coastal ecosystem s...
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The siting of protected areas to achieve management and conservation objectives draws heavily on biogeographic concepts of the spatial distribution and connectivity of species. However, the marine protected area (MPA) literature rarely acknowledges how biogeographic theories underpin MPA and MPA network design. We review which theories from biogeog...
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Economic incentives to harvest a species usually diminish as its abundance declines, because harvest costs increase. This prevents harvesting to extinction. A known exception can occur if consumer demand causes a declining species' harvest price to rise faster than costs. This threat may affect rare and valuable species, such as large land mammals,...
Article
Excess sediment and nutrient runoff from land-based human activities are considered serious threats to coastal and marine ecosystems by most conservation practitioners, resource managers, fishers, and other "downstream" resource users. Deleterious consequences of coastal runoff, including eutrophication and hypoxia, have been observed worldwide. Li...
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Full-text available
Caribbean coastal ecosystems have undergone severe degradation both historically and recently, primarily caused by the synergistic effects of overfishing, eutrophication, sedimentation, disease, and other factors associated with humans. Baseline conditions from pristine Caribbean reefs and seagrass beds are required to understand and quantify degra...

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Project