Alex Spice

Alex Spice
Imperial College London | Imperial · Department of Chemical Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy
Field Application Scientist at Fluidic Analytics

About

4
Publications
576
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38
Citations
Introduction
Alex Spice currently works in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London and is a member of the Imperial College Centre for Synthetic Biology. My research focuses on producing virus-like particles using cell-free protein synthesis systems.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - present
Imperial College London
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Towards the production of virus-like particles using cell-free systems.
October 2016 - September 2017
University of Bath
Position
  • MRes Student
Education
September 2017 - March 2021
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Synthetic Biology/ Molecular Biology
September 2016 - September 2017
University of Bath
Field of study
  • Biosciences
September 2012 - July 2015
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Biochemistry

Publications

Publications (4)
Chapter
Pichia pastoris (syn. Komagataella phaffii) is an industrially relevant recombinant protein platform that has been used to produce over 5000 proteins to date. Cell-free protein synthesis can be used as a screening tool before strain development or for the production of proteins that are difficult or toxic to make in vivo. Here we describe the metho...
Article
Full-text available
Cell-free protein synthesis is a powerful tool for engineering biology and has been utilized in many diverse applications, from biosensing and protein prototyping to biomanufacturing and the design of metabolic pathways. By exploiting host cellular machinery decoupled from cellular growth, proteins can be produced in vitro both on demand and rapidl...
Article
Full-text available
A renaissance in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is underway, enabled by the acceleration and adoption of synthetic biology methods. CFPS has emerged as a powerful platform technology for synthetic gene network design, biosensing and on-demand biomanufacturing. Whilst primarily of bacterial origin, cell-free extracts derived from a variety of ho...
Article
Full-text available
Virus-like particles (VLPs) are supramolecular protein assemblies with the potential for unique and exciting applications in synthetic biology and medicine. Despite the attention VLPs have gained thus far, considerable limitations still persist in their production. Poorly scalable manufacturing technologies and inconsistent product architectures co...

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