Alex Rushforth

Alex Rushforth
Leiden University | LEI

About

26
Publications
17,268
Reads
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1,220
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
1198 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
The range and types of performance metrics has recently proliferated in academic settings, with bibliometric indicators being particularly visible examples. One field that has traditionally been hospitable towards such indicators is biomedicine. Here the relative merits of bibliometrics are widely discussed, with debates often portraying them as he...
Article
Full-text available
This review of the international literature on evaluation systems, evaluation practices, and metrics (mis)uses was written as part of a larger review commissioned by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to inform their independent assessment of the role of metrics in research evaluation (2014–5). The literature on evaluation sys...
Article
Full-text available
Policy Points • For complex reasons, the promise of “precision medicine” based on molecular pathways remains unrealized for many conditions. • Clinical practice guidelines (theoretically, at least) can act as “trailblazers” to introduce tests and treatments that reflect precision medicine discoveries. • We describe a detailed case study from the U...
Article
Full-text available
Callard and Perego depict long Covid as the first illness to be defined by patients who came together on social media. Responding to their call to address why patients were so effective in making long Covid visible and igniting action to improve its care, we use narrative inquiry – a field of research that investigates the place and power of storie...
Article
Full-text available
Persistent symptoms lasting longer than 3 weeks are thought to affect 10-20% of patients following SARS-CoV-2 infection. No formal guidelines exist in the UK for treating patients with long COVID and services are sporadic and variable, although additional funding is promised for their development.In this study, narrative interviews and focus groups...
Article
Full-text available
Background Approximately 10% of patients with Covid-19 experience symptoms beyond 3–4 weeks. Patients call this “long Covid”. We sought to document such patients’ lived experience, including accessing and receiving healthcare and ideas for improving services. Methods We held 55 individual interviews and 8 focus groups (n = 59) with people recruite...
Preprint
Full-text available
Persistent symptoms lasting longer than 3 weeks are thought to affect 10-20% of patients following Covid 19 infection. No formal guidelines exist in the United Kingdom for treating ‘long Covid’ patients and services are sporadic and variable, although additional funding is promised for their development. In this study narrative interviews and focus...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Approximately 10% of patients with Covid-19 experience symptoms beyond 3-4 weeks. Patients call this “long Covid”. We sought to document the lived experience of such patients, their accounts of accessing and receiving healthcare, and their ideas for improving services. Method We held 55 individual interviews and 8 focus groups (n = 59)...
Article
Full-text available
This paper builds on emerging concerns with how temporality and spatiality unfold in, and order, academic evaluation practices. We unpack how the notion of ‘trajectory’ – a simultaneously prospective and retrospective narrative device permeating contemporary academic evaluation discourses – is mobilized within a particular evaluation site. Material...
Article
Full-text available
How are “interesting” research problems identified and made durable by academic researchers, particularly in situations defined by multiple evaluation principles? Building on two case studies of research groups working on rare diseases in academic biomedicine, we explore how group leaders arrange their groups to encompass research problems that lat...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country's international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients,...
Article
Full-text available
A researcher's number of publications has been a fundamental merit in the competition for academic positions since the late 18th century. Today, the simple counting of publications has been supplemented with a whole range of bibliometric indicators, which supposedly not only measures the volume of research but also its impact. In this study, we inv...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Combining results from bibliometric analyses, a global sample of researcher opinions and case-study interviews, a new report reveals that although the benefits of open research data are well known, in practice, confusion remains within the researcher community around when and how to share research data. The report, Open Data: The Researcher Perspe...
Article
Full-text available
While the efficacy of peer review for allocating institutional funding and benchmarking is often studied, not much is known about issues faced in peer review for organizational learning and advisory purposes. We build on this concern by analyzing the largely formative evaluation by external committees of new large, ‘translational’ research programs...
Article
Full-text available
Translational science is currently proving a highly influential term in framing how biomedical research is promoted and evaluated in a great number of countries. Although there has been a steady trickle of scholarly literature on the topic, the performative uses of the term in practices of academic researchers has been under-researched. Drawing on...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction. Our study critically engages with techniques of self-quantification in contemporary academia, by demonstrating how social networking services enact research and scholarly communication as a 'game'. Method. The empirical part of the study involves an analysis of two leading platforms: Impactstory and ResearchGate. Observed qualities of...
Article
Full-text available
Pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) are today an increasingly prominent means of measuring the 'effectiveness' of healthcare interventions in 'real world' clinical settings, in order to produce evidence on which to base regulatory and clinical decision-making. Although several sociological studies have shown persuasively how PCTs are co-constructed wi...
Article
Recent high-profile statements, criticisms, and boycotts organized against certain quantitative indicators (e.g., the DORA declaration) have brought misuses of performance metrics to the center of attention. A key concern captured in these movements is that the metrics appear to carry authority even where established agents of quality control have...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
There is a lot of debate about mechanisms at the moment, especially in US sociology. Not all students of mechanisms seem to share the same intellectual lineage e.g. methodological individualism (Hedstrom and Swedberg), pragmatism (Neil Gross, 2009), and cultural sociology (Lyn Spiller, 2013) have all staked claims, showing there is far from consensus. My question is, which, if any, of these mechanisms approaches provides the most appropriate bed-fellow in respect to the middle-range theory you propose here? Does it have to be an either-or choice? More generally do you find potential inconsistencies between theoretical perspectives a problem or might they be useful with regards synthesis? Alex Rushforth, CWTS, Leiden.

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