Alex Panicacci

Alex Panicacci
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Psychology

PhD in Applied Linguistics at Birkbeck, University of London
Seeking for UK/US collaborations to conduct research on diversity to enhance inclusion, belonging, and social justice.

About

23
Publications
6,723
Reads
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73
Citations
Introduction
I am a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow working at a new project entitled ‘Is a multilingual and multicultural identity an obstacle to integration?’ This research investigates identity practices in multicultural and fast-changing societies. Understanding how people reconcile different languages and cultures within their sense of self while still feeling part of a community can help us design righteous inclusive efforts to build an equal, just society.
Additional affiliations
December 2019 - present
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Visiting British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow working on a project entitled: 'is a multilingual and multicultural identity an obstacle to integration?'. Main institution: Queen Mary, University of London.
September 2019 - present
Queen Mary, University of London
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I am currently working at a new project entitled ‘Is a multilingual and multicultural identity an obstacle to integration?’ This research involves visits at the University of Washington, Seattle, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
July 2019 - September 2019
Ministero degli Affari Esteri
Position
  • Consular Officer
Education
October 2011 - October 2017
Birkbeck, University of London
Field of study
  • Applied Lnguistics
September 2007 - June 2008
King's College London
Field of study
  • Humanities - Philosophy

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
This study focuses on migrants' sense of belonging to the heritage and the host culture and adopts an innovative approach to the topic by placing biographical and linguistic factors side by side. Statistical results from 468 migrants, supported by 5 follow-up interviews, revealed that the age of migration, the length of stay and the status in the h...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that emotional patterns are modified by linguistic and cultural influence. The present paper adopts a different perspective on the topic, investigating whether expressing emotions in the local language (LX) could predict migrants’ acculturation attitudes towards the heritage (L1) and the host (LX) cultures. Quantitative...
Article
Full-text available
A majority of multilinguals report feeling different when switching languages (Dewaele, 2016; Panicacci & Dewaele, 2017). The present study focuses on feelings of difference when switching languages with specific categories of interlocutors (strangers, colleagues, friends, family, partner) and when discussing specific types of topics (neutral, pers...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of multilinguals immersed in different cultures report feeling different when switching languages. Although the influence of personality on self-perceptions has been investigated, little attention has been paid to acculturation aspects. The present study is based on a mixed-method approach combining questionnaire and interview data. Pa...
Article
Full-text available
When COVID-19 was declared a pandemic, the education sector soon faced the unprecedented challenge of moving courses online within no time. The rapid implementation of emergency remote teaching (ERT) led to students and teachers alike being thrown into an emotional terra incognita. This paper sets out to explore if foreign language (LX) grit, learn...
Article
Full-text available
Despite being regarded by some as the most humanistic of the social sciences, linguistics has been criticized for its undertheorized application of the notions of race and ethnicity. This white paper is written for practicing linguists. We provide definitions of these terms and develop attendant issues that contribute to their complexity, such as t...
Book
This book explores the ways in which migrants’ experience in today’s multilingual and multicultural society informs language use and processing, behavioural patterns, and perceptions of self-identity. Drawing on survey data from hundreds of Italian migrants living in English- speaking countries, in conjunction with more focused interviews, this vo...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that emotional patterns are modified by linguistic and cultural influence. The present paper adopts a different perspective on the topic, investigating whether expressing emotions in the local language (LX) could predict migrants’ acculturation attitudes towards the heritage (L1) and the host (LX) cultures. Quantitative...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Multiple selves perception, cultural orientation and personality traits in migrants’ experience. “This language is beginning to invent another me” (Hoffman 1989:121). The majority of multilinguals immersed in different cultures report feeling different when switching languages despite their proficiency level (Dewaele 2016), leading toward the idea...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
URL: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events-calendar/bloomsbury-round-table-on-communication-cognition-and-culture-multilingualism-multiculturalism-and-emotion “This language is beginning to invent another me” (Hoffman 1989:121). The majority of multilinguals immersed in different cultures report feeling different when switching languages despite their profi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
URL: https://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/events/research-student-conference/ Culture plays a crucial role in shaping individuals' identity and personality. Migrating from one culture to another implies crossing not only geographical borders but also cultural and linguistic ones. These borders are less tangible and people seem to take longer to adap...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that emotional patterns are modified by linguistic and cultural influence. The present paper adopts a different perspective on the topic, investigating whether expressing emotions in the local language (LX) could predict migrants’ acculturation attitudes towards the heritage (L1) and the host (LX) cultures. Quantitative...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Across the globe, universities and businesses have pledged to implement diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Very little of the discussion of DEI includes language in spite of research demonstrating for some time that salient linguistic features play a role in discrimination (involving variables such as race, class, gender, ability, sexuality, geography, etc). Some linguistic discrimination in the working environment arises in the realm of speakers of languages other than English but also speakers of non-mainstream dialects. This project aims to raise awareness about language bias in different work environments.
Project
Linguistics has been criticised for its undertheorised application of the notions of race and ethnicity and limited attention is given to race and ethnicity in training researchers. This project aims to provide definitions of these terms and develop attendant issues that contribute to their complexity, such as the multiplicity and fluidity of racial identification. We consider issues pertinent to collecting information about self-identification in a range of study types, from quantitative, experimental, computational or intuitional approaches to qualitative and mixed methods designs. We consider the advantages and disadvantages of eliciting demographic data using multiple-choice, free-response and interview formats, and offer recommendations drawing on best practices from within linguistics and its sister fields. Ethical concerns are raised, including using locally constructed labels, respecting communities, analyst positionality, recognising the potential for harm. The main goal is to provide researchers with tools to reflect on their own study design, reflect on their own responsibility to participants and communities, and design study prompts that allow more nuanced representation of race or ethnicity.
Project
Present-day societies are rapidly changing and becoming increasingly characterised by linguistic and cultural diversity. Constant migration flows and the rise of new opportunities for intercultural exchange have meant that individuals embody a greater multilingualism and multiculturalism. Understanding the dynamics of modern multicultural societies is crucial to help government and social departments develop adequate policies on both national and local levels within the socio-economic and legal circumstances affecting members of the population. In this context, the present project wants to focus on identity and acculturation practices. Traditional acculturation models, exclusively based on the distinction of heritage and mainstream culture dimensions, are not able to realistically capture the features of multilingual and multicultural societies. Individuals clearly require more flexibility and awareness in acknowledging their diversity. For instance, the pure ethnic look might not necessarily be carrier of foreignness, while a regional accent could be a stronger identity marker than a passport. Who is more diverse than whom? Who is more transnational? Who is more integrated? The need for investigating these processes more systematically has never been more vital. In fact, understanding how individuals appreciate linguistic and cultural hybridity within themselves is the first step towards a better understanding of what factors can foster good integration practices, so to establish a diverse, yet enriched society, which is a stable ground for economical growth.