Alex Gibson

Alex Gibson
The University of York · Department of Archaeology

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42
Publications
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308
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
145 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230510152025
20172018201920202021202220230510152025
20172018201920202021202220230510152025

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Survey and sampling at the classic single-entranced henge monument at Castle Dykes, in North Yorkshire, has revealed traces of circular timber structures, interpreted as later prehistoric roundhouses, in the immediate vicinity and within the henge. Coring of the waterlogged silts of the internal ditch has produced considerable environmental data: p...
Article
Full-text available
The paper discusses the Garboldisham macehead: an unusual decorated macehead carved from red deer antler. The macehead was found in the 1960s deposited in a tributary of the river Little Ouse, Norfolk and is decorated with three spirals, making it especially significant. This paper reports on the analysis of the decoration using digital imaging, di...
Article
Large scale geophysical survey has identified two classic henges in the Wharfe Valley and excavation at the henge at Yarnbury has proved its Bronze Age date, reuniting it with antiquarian finds hitherto lacking secure provenance. These henges are placed in their archaeological context suggesting that Wharfedale may have been an important route in c...
Article
Landscape geophysical survey around the small upland ‘henge’ at Yarnbury, Grassington, North Yorkshire revealed few anthropogenic features around the enclosure but did identify a small rectangular structure in the same field. Sample trenching of this feature, radiocarbon and archaeomagnetic dating proved it to be an earlier Neolithic post and wattl...
Article
Full-text available
The appearance of the distinctive ‘Beaker package’ marks an important horizon in British prehistory, but was it associated with immigrants to Britain or with indigenous converts? Analysis of the skeletal remains of 264 individuals from the British Chalcolithic–Early Bronze Age is revealing new information about the diet, migration and mobility of t...
Article
Bradley Richard . The good stones: a new investigation of the Clava cairns (Society of Antiquaries of Scotland Monograph 17). xviii+245 pages, 185 figures, 39 tables. 2000. Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland: 0-903903-17-2 (ISSN 0263-3191) paperback £36. - Volume 75 Issue 290 - Alex Gibson
Article
Fieldwork east of Oakham, Rutland has located evidence of prehistoric settlement, land use patterns, and ceremonial monuments. Part of this included the excavation of a cropmark site which has revealed an unusual sequence of Neolithic/Early Bronze Age pit circles and a burial area. This is complemented by a fieldwalking survey of the surrounding ar...
Article
Excavations between November 1990 and February 1992 have produced important information on the date and development of the Sarn-y-bryn-caled cursus complex between 3000–2000 BC. In particular a timber circle of 2000 BC, two penannular ring-ditches and a section across the cursus monument were excavated. A radiocarbon sequence has been obtained. The...
Article
Late in November 1981, Mr M. Wright of the Danywenallt Centre, Talybont, noticed fragments of prehistoric pottery and an associated cremation burial in an area eroded by walkers in the pathway on Fan y Big (SO 03712057; fig. 1). The site lies at a height of 655 m on one of the denuded spurs of the northern escarpment of the Beacons (pl. 12). The fi...
Article
An Examination of Prehistoric Stone Bracers from Britain, by AnnWoodward & JohnHunter, with DavidBukach, FionaRoe, PeterWebb, RobIxer, JohnWatson and PhilPotts, 2011. Oxford: Oxbow Books; ISBN 978-1-84217-438-8 hardback £45 & US$90; 186 pp., 52 figs., 30 tables, CD - Volume 22 Issue 3 - Alex Gibson
Article
Topographical and geophysical survey was undertaken at the Neolithic long barrows of Esh's Barrow and Denby House as part of an assessment of the Neolithic barrows of the upper Gypsey Race (Great Wold) Valley. Denby House proved to still survive as an earthwork and geophysical survey revealed the lay-out of the barrow features. The survey of Esh's...
Article
The Neolithic round barrow at Duggleby Howe comprises a substantial mound surrounded by a large causewayed ditch. The mound covers a rich Middle Neolithic burial sequence, as revealed by Mortimer's nineteenth-century excavations, and occupies a position on the northern valley side of the Gypsey Race, near to the stream's source. Following the recen...
Article
The timber circle and other sites within the Sarn-y-bryn-caled ritual complex were excavated in advance of the construction of the Welshpool bypass and published in this journal in 1994 (Gibson 1994). The radiocarbon dating undertaken at the time relied totally on charcoal and, in the case of site 1 (the timber circle) and site 2 (a small panannula...
Article
The henge monument and round barrow at Dyffryn Lane, near Welshpool, Powys, represent a rare instance of earthwork survival amongst the Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments of the upper Severn Valley. Antiquarian excavation in response to agricultural degradation suggested that the monument represented a round barrow covering a stone circle. Whether...
Article
Full-text available
Excavated by John Mortimer at the end of the nineteenth century, Duggleby Howe, near the source of the Gypsey Race in the Yorkshire Wolds, is one of the most iconic round barrow sites of the British Neolithic, not least because of Mortimer's detailed description, his schematic section and the range of prestige goods associated with the burials. Des...
Article
No Excavation at a cropmark enclosure in the Upper Severn Valley was undertaken to try and obtain material from which to provide relative and absolute dating for the site. Lying within an area rich in Neolithic and Bronze Age archaeology and in close proximity to a proven long barrow, the conventional later prehistoric date postulated for the enclo...
Book
Full-text available
The technical study of a Bronze Age sewn-plank boat discovered in Dover in 1992, dated to 1575-1520 cal BC (95% probability).
Article
Trevisker pottery is a common Bronze Age type in Cornwall and the southwest of England. It is often well-made and with a distinct petrology. It was, however, traded in prehistory with some petrologically similar vessels being found in Brittany and northern France. Recently, a Cornish-style vessel made from Cornish clays has been located in eastern...
Article
Radiocarbon dates are presented for distinctive types of British Late Neolithic pottery, identifying questions which cannot yet be resolved.
Article
The complete excavation of one and the partial excavation of a second bronze age structured cairn are described. The excavations provided important evidence for the construction sequence of the cairns and Welsh bronze age funerary practices. A series of radiocarbon dates was obtained for the collared urns associated with the cairns
Article
This paper re‐examines the pit circles at Dorchester on Thames in the light of the recently excavated timber circle at Sarn‐y‐bryn‐caled. It is suggested that the Dorchester sites were originally timber circles whose posts were later dug out prior to their secondary use as cremation cemeteries. Pits in the base of the segmented ditches, interpreted...
Article
A circle of pits from the Welsh borders is another addition to the curious catalogue of British ceremonial monuments of the Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age, and provides – as often before – intriguing clues as to how it was structured and used.
Article
The beginning of the Bronze Age in the British Isles has traditionally been marked by the appearance, in the archaeological record, of Beaker assemblages, mainly characterized by the Beaker pottery form itself. Ceramic typologies based on this style, which is undoubtedly continental in origin, have been used both for relative dating and as evidence...
Article
No This volume represents the publication of a highly successful conference held in 2003 to celebrate the contribution to Neolithic and Early Bronze Age studies of one of archaeology's finest synthesisers, Professor Stuart Piggott. The title is a reference to his famous work, Ancient Europe from the beginnings of agriculture to Classical Antiquity,...

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