Alessandro Liuti

Alessandro Liuti
University of Melbourne | MSD · Melbourne School of Design

M.Arch. + M.Eng.

About

9
Publications
11,060
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22
Citations
Introduction
Alessandro Liuti currently works at the Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne. Alessandro does research in Architectural Engineering and lightweight structures. His current project is 'Forming timber gridshells with air - Simulations and technology'.
Additional affiliations
April 2014 - present
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (9)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper overviews the design-to-construction interfaces in bending-active structures, which still show considerable gaps and discontinuities between the increasingly precise computational-based design stages and the often artisanal/empiric manufacturing and construction stages. Such discrepancies can either introduce redundant structural element...
Thesis
The evolution of design and construction methods for lightweight structures historically feature patterns and similarities; elastic gridshells make no exception. Gridshells make efficient use of small sections of material to create large structures. Inspired by the advancements of Frei Otto and Dante Bini, the author develops a safe and economical...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conventional cable-net structures generally feature a tensioned structural net carrying a secondary non-structural layer of cladding panels; this commonly implies that cladding is developed subordinately to the form-found surface – i.e. by either using curved panels, or discretizing the original surface through planar quads or triangles. This paper...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents the construction of Airshell, a small timber gridshell prototype erected by employing a pneumatic formwork. Inspired by the work of Frei Otto and Dante Bini, the technique is based on a pneumatic membrane and an Arduino® board – the former used as dynamic formwork and the latter to monitor both the structure height and the membr...
Conference Paper
Construction has always been a fascinating and challenging aspect of timber gridshells. So far, only three techniques have successfully been used for the erection of such structures: the so-called ‘lift-up’, ‘push-up’ and ‘ease-down’ (Quinn et al. 2015). Inflatable Membrane Technology is here proposed as a new solution and is tested by means of num...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conventional inflatable material systems offer a quick and reversible means of construction, however presenting limitations in terms of adaptability. Conventional, discrete, form-resistant structures feature stability through the complex organisation of discrete elements , however featuring inertias in terms of flexibility and disecon-omies if appl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper describes a new erection technique for post-formed timber gridshells which takes advantage of inflatable membrane technology. Consolidated construction techniques for timber gridshells are based either on “pull-up” / “push-up” (i.e. Mannheim Multihalle) or “ease-down” behavior (i.e. Downland Open Air Museum). However, these techniques sh...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Before the introduction of NURBS-based CAD software and optimisation, the design of form-resistant structures was based on the use of either experimental tools (physical form-finding) or analytical surfaces, and architects were challenged in the articulation of spaces from the intrinsic characteristics/rules of structural forms. An outstanding exam...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper deals with a multi-objective design/optimization grid-shell problem. Structural behavior and light absorption/shading have been selected as fitness functions. Such performance criteria can separately lead to different and divergent optimal solutions but, if they are considered as a whole, they are expected to result in several equivalent...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This research project aims to develop and apply numerical optimisation techniques, such as Genetic Algorithms, for the design and optimisation of free-form and innovative form-resistant structures. In particular, the research group has already obtained results on the following sub-topics: 1. Computational morphogenesis of free-form RC structures. Goal: develop an interface between CAD parametric models and FE solvers to run optimisation procedures during conceptual design; develop a strategy to interpret the results of a GA optimisation procedure, that is supporting the selection of sub-optimal shapes for shell structures. Current results: The Crematorium of Kakamigahara was selected as the first case study to develop an interface between Rhinoceros (where the parametric model of the roof was defined) and Ansys (which was used to perform FE analyses). The optimisation process was run by means of a GA. 2. Computational morphogenesis of acoustic folded-plate structures. Goal: develop a raytracing algorithm for rapid acoustic analyses of architectural spaces; test the raytracing algorithm for the optimisation of a hypothetical folded-plate roof structure for a concert hall. 3. Computational morphogenesis applied to historical case studies. First goal: study the emergence of unexpected topological variations of a parametrically defined composition of hypars. Current results: The Church of Longuelo was selected as the first historical case study to be redesigned starting from concepts rather than from the original spatial configuration of the building. Second goal: study the acoustic performance of Frei Otto’s tensile structures, therefore combining structural form finding with acoustic optimisation. Current results: Redesign of the Dance Pavilion and the five umbrella structures in Kassel (currently under development). 4. Geometry optimisation of free-form gridshells. Goal: rationalise the production and reduce the construction costs of structural and cladding elements. Current results: development of a GA and a VFDM for the optimisation of free-form glass gridshells. 5. Development of E-learning material for the Melbourne School of Design students. Goal: development of video tutorials and GH definition for Master’s students. This e-learning material includes tutorials for: surface discretisation, structural form finding, structural FE analysis, geometry preparation for fabrication.
Project
This PhD research project aims to explore the application of pneumatic membranes to the erection of elastic gridshells.