Alessandra Griffa

Alessandra Griffa
University of Geneva | UNIGE · Department of Clinical Neuroscience

PhD

About

123
Publications
23,672
Reads
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3,672
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - present
University Medical Center Utrecht
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2015 - March 2016
Lausanne University Hospital
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2011 - July 2015
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (123)
Article
Connectome Mapper 3 (CMP3) is an open-source processing pipeline software, written in Python 3, for multi-scale multi-modal connectome mapping of the human brain. It provides researchers with a unique workflow, implemented in accordance with the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) App framework, that leverages a number of widely adopted software to...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To assess whether gait, neuropsychological, and multimodal MRI parameters predict short-term symptom reversal after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Methods Thirty patients (79.3 ± 5.9 years, 12 women) with a diagnosis of probable iNPH and 46 healthy controls (74.7 ± 5.4 years, 35 wom...
Article
Full-text available
Lack of awareness of cognitive impairment (i.e., anosognosia) could be a key factor for distinguishing between neuropsychological post-COVID-19 condition phenotypes. In this context, the twofold aim of the present study was to i) establish the prevalence of anosognosia for memory impairment, according to the severity of the infection in the acute p...
Article
Brain signatures of functional activity have shown promising results in both decoding brain states, meaning distinguishing between different tasks, and fingerprinting, that is identifying individuals within a large group. Importantly, these brain signatures do not account for the underlying brain anatomy on which brain function takes place. Structu...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to examine if patterns of resting-state brain activity and functional connectivity in cortical and subcortical regions in patients with early symptomatic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) resemble those of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). In a cross-sectional design, eyes-closed resting-state ma...
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Encephalopathy is a neurological complication of COVID-19. The objective of this exploratory study is to investigate the link between systemic inflammation and brain microstructural changes (measured by diffusion-weighted imaging) in patients with COVID-19 encephalopathy. 20 patients with COVID-19 encephalopathy (age: 67.3 $$\pm$$ ± 10.0 years; 90%...
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Although shared behavioral and neural mechanisms between working memory (WM) and motor sequence learning (MSL) have been suggested, the additive and interactive effects of training have not been studied. This study aimed at investigating changes in brain functional connectivity (FC) induced by sequential (WM + MSL and MSL + WM) and combined (WM × M...
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The oldest-old subjects represent the fastest growing segment of society and are at high risk for dementia with a prevalence of up to 40%. Lifestyle factors, such as lifelong participation in cognitive and leisure activities, may contribute to individual cognitive reserve and reduce the risk for cognitive impairments. However, the neural bases unde...
Article
Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology impacts the response to treatment in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH), possibly through changes in resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC). Objective: To explore the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of AD and the default mode network (DMN)/hippoc...
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Individual characterization of subjects based on their functional connectome (FC), termed “FC fingerprinting”, has become a highly sought-after goal in contemporary neuroscience research. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated unique characterization and accurate identification of individuals as an accomplishe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Brain signatures of functional activity have shown promising results in both decoding brain states, meaning distinguishing between different tasks, and fingerprinting , that is identifying individuals within a large group. Importantly, these brain signatures do not account for the underlying brain anatomy on which brain function takes place. Struct...
Article
Full-text available
Psychosis, characterized by hallucinations and delusions, is a common feature of psychiatric disease, especially schizophrenia. One prominent theory posits that psychosis is driven by abnormal sensorimotor predictions leading to the misattribution of self-related events. This misattribution has been linked to passivity experiences (PE), such as los...
Article
COVER ILLUSTRATION Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (iNPH), the leading cause of reversible dementia in ageing, is currently underdiagnosed and poorly understood. Using functional brain imaging and molecular data, Griffa et al. demonstrate an alteration of Default Mode Network resting‐state dynamics in iNPH patients compared to healthy cont...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individual characterization of subjects based on their functional connectome (FC), termed 'FC fingerprinting', has become a highly sought-after goal in contemporary neuroscience research. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated unique characterization and accurate identification of individuals as an accomplishe...
Article
Full-text available
Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (iNPH)-the leading cause of reversible dementia in aging-is characterized by ventriculomegaly and gait, cognitive and urinary impairments. Despite its high prevalence estimated at 6% among the elderlies, iNPH remains underdiagnosed and undertreated due to the lack of iNPH-specific diagnostic markers and limi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) presents typical radiological signs that have been summarised in a semi-quantitative scale named the iNPH Radscale. However, the iNPH Radscale's predictive value for response to cerebrospinal uid (CSF) tap test has never been studied. This study aims to investigate if the iNPH Radscale can...
Article
Dysfunction of sensorimotor predictive processing is thought to underlie abnormalities in self-monitoring producing passivity symptoms in psychosis. Experimentally induced sensorimotor conflict can produce a failure in bodily self-monitoring (presence hallucination [PH]), yet it is unclear how this is related to auditory self-monitoring and psychos...
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Full-text available
Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a prevalent reversible neurological disorder characterized by impaired locomotion, cognition and urinary control with ventriculomegaly. Symptoms can be relieved with cerebrospinal fluid drainage, which makes iNPH the leading cause of reversible dementia. Because of a limited understanding of pathop...
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Full-text available
Late human development is characterized by the maturation of high-level functional processes, which rely on reshaping of white matter connections, as well as synaptic density. However, the relationship between the whole-brain dynamics and the underlying white matter networks in neurodevelopment is largely unknown. In this study, we focused on how t...
Article
Background: The timed up and go (TUG) is a test used to assess mobility in older adults and patients with neurological conditions. This study aims to compare brain gray matter (GM) correlates and structural covariance networks associated with the TUG time in cognitively healthy individuals (CHI) and in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)...
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Clinical network neuroscience, the study of brain network topology in neurological and psychiatric diseases, has become a mainstay field within clinical neuroscience. Being a multidisciplinary group of clinical network neuroscience experts based in The Netherlands, we often discuss the current state of the art and possible avenues for future invest...
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Background: There is increasing evidence that redox dysregulation, which can lead to oxidative stress and eventually to impairment of oligodendrocytes and parvalbumin interneurons, may underlie brain connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. Accordingly, we previously reported that levels of brain antioxidant glutathione in the medial prefrontal...
Article
Fluctuations in functional interactions between brain regions typically occur at the millisecond time scale. Conventional connectivity metrics are not adequately time-resolved to detect such fast fluctuations in functional connectivity. At the same time, attempts to use conventional metrics in a time-resolved manner usually come with the selection...
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Background Psychosis is often depicted as a disruption of the self-model. Patients suffering from psychosis report many symptoms relating to deficiencies in the minimal self, including loss of the sense of control over their actions (Sense of Agency) as well as numerous disturbances of body representation (e.g. Body Ownership). Positive symptoms of...
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Emerging evidence indicates that a disruption in brain network organization may play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The neuroimaging fingerprint reflecting the pathophysiology of first-episode schizophrenia remains to be identified. Here, we aimed at characterizing the connectome organization of first-episode medication-...
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Early in the course of psychosis, alterations in brain connectivity accompany the emergence of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairments, including processing speed. The clinical-staging model is a refined form of diagnosis that places the patient along a continuum of illness conditions, which allows stage-specific interventions with the poten...
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Full-text available
Large-scale structural brain networks encode white matter connectivity patterns among distributed brain areas. These connection patterns are believed to support cognitive processes and, when compromised, can lead to neurocognitive deficits and maladaptive behavior. A powerful approach for studying the organizing principles of brain networks is to c...
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Full-text available
Background The oldest-old (subjects aged 90 years and older) population represents the fastest growing segment of society and shows a high dementia prevalence rate of up to 40%. Only a few studies have investigated protective factors for cognitive impairment in the oldest-old. The EMIF-AD 90+ Study aims to identify factors associated with resilienc...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to childhood trauma (CT) increases the risk for psychosis and affects the development of brain structures, possibly through oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also linked to psychosis, it may interact with CT, leading to a more severe clinical phenotype. In 133 patients with early psychosis (EPP), we explored the relationships betwee...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanism-based treatments for schizophrenia are needed, and increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress may be a target. Previous research has shown that N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and glutathione (GSH) precursor almost devoid of side effects, improved negative symptoms, decreased the side effects of antipsychotics, and improved...
Preprint
Full-text available
Large-scale structural brain networks encode white-matter connectivity patterns among distributed brain areas. These connection patterns are believed to support cognitive processes and, when compromised, can lead to neurocognitive deficits and maladaptive behavior. A powerful approach for studying the organizing principles of brain networks is to c...
Conference Paper
The thalamus has a central role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Formed by several nuclei, it is mainly constituted by partial volume (PV) of grey and white matter. We hypothesize that a PV segmentation will be better in measuring subtle changes in schizophrenia than total thalamus volume or local measurements that do not consider PV. We co...
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Full-text available
Connectomics generates comprehensive maps of brain networks, represented as nodes and their pairwise connections. The functional roles of nodes are defined by their direct and indirect connectivity with the rest of the network. However, the network context is not directly accessible at the level of individual nodes. Similar problems in language pro...
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Full-text available
Over the past decades, network neuroscience has played a fundamental role in the understanding of large-scale brain connectivity architecture. Brains, and more generally nervous systems, can be modeled as sets of elements (neurons, assemblies, or cortical chunks) that dynamically interact through a highly structured and adaptive neurocircuitry. An...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decades, network neuroscience has played a fundamental role in the understanding of large-scale brain connectivity architecture. Brains, and more generally nervous systems, can be modeled as sets of elements (neurons, assemblies, or cortical chunks) that dynamically interact through a highly structured and adaptive neurocircuitry. An...
Article
Aim Impulsive behaviours, which are frequent in young people suffering from psychosis have been linked to risky and violent behaviours and participate to the burden of psychotic illness. Given that morphological brain correlates of impulsivity in schizophrenia have been poorly investigated especially in young adults, the aim of this study was to in...
Article
Full-text available
Converging evidence from activation, connectivity, and stimulation studies suggests that auditory brain networks are lateralized. Here we show that these findings can be at least partly explained by the asymmetric network embedding of the primary auditory cortices. Using diffusion-weighted imaging in 3 independent datasets, we investigate the prope...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Exposure to childhood trauma (CT) is a global major public-health and social-welfare problem worldwide. CT increases the vulnerability to major psychiatric conditions including psychosis and is associated with poorer clinical outcome. CT affects the development of brain structures such as hippocampus, possibly through oxidative stress an...
Article
Full-text available
Background Beneficial effects of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on negative symptoms in chronic schizophrenia have been reported in two studies. A recent study in early psychosis from our group, did not report significant improvement in negative symptoms (potentially linked to the modest baseline levels) but showed improvement in cognition (i.e. processin...
Article
Full-text available
Background In schizophrenic patients, increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved on the disease pathophysiology. Estimation of the level of glutathione (GSH), main actor of the brain redox dysregulation, has revealed a decreased GSH levels in early psychosis patients (EPP). N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant and precursor...
Article
Full-text available
Background Widespread (Klauser et al., 2016) and progressive (Cropley et al., 2017) cerebral anomalies of white matter diffusion properties (i.e. fractional anisotropy, FA) have been observed in the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank (ASRB), one of the largest samples of patients with schizophrenia. From a topological perspective, widespread al...
Preprint
Full-text available
Converging evidence from activation, connectivity and stimulation studies suggests that auditory brain networks are lateralized. Here we show that these findings can be at least partly explained by the asymmetric network embedding of the primary auditory cortices. Using diffusion-weighted imaging in three independent datasets, we investigate the pr...
Article
Full-text available
Here we test the hypothesis that the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson's disease (PD) moves stereotypically along neural networks, possibly reflecting the spread of toxic alpha-synuclein molecules. PD patients (n = 105) and matched controls (n = 57) underwent T1-MRI at entry and 1 year later as part of the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and cognitive deficits. The neurodegenerative process is thought to move stereotypically from the brainstem up to the cerebral cortex, possibly reflecting the spread of toxic alpha-synuclein molecules. Using a large, longitudinal, multi-center database of de...
Article
Full-text available
Stochastic resonance is a phenomenon in which noise enhances the response of a system to an input signal. The brain is an example of a system that has to detect and transmit signals in a noisy environment, suggesting that it is a good candidate to take advantage of stochastic resonance. In this work, we aim to identify the optimal levels of noise t...