Alecia Marie Magnifico

Alecia Marie Magnifico
University of New Hampshire | UNH · Department of English

Doctor of Philosophy

About

24
Publications
6,004
Reads
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526
Citations
Introduction
I am an associate professor in the English department at the University of New Hampshire, where I direct the English Teaching program. I teach courses on English teaching methods, digital literacies, and research methods. Much of my work describes and theorizes adolescents’ writing and literacies in the many spaces and contexts to which they contribute (e.g. school, extracurricular, online, social). Across these contexts, I am especially interested in how people work together to create, maintain, and contribute to learning spaces. Increasingly, lately, I’ve been working with secondary and college teachers to learn about and design for teaching writing in and through digital technologies.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - July 2019
University of New Hampshire
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2012 - November 2015
University of New Hampshire
Position
  • Assistant Professor of English Teaching
August 2010 - August 2013
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
As literacy researchers trace how people make meaning across multiple contexts and online environments, ethical complexities arise that require researchers to be culturally attuned, flexible, innovative, and reflexive. This article draws on a transliteracies perspective to argue that ethical issues related to accessibility, positionality, relationa...
Article
Several recent studies examine social aspects of online peer review writing environments, but little of this work focuses on how resulting social interactions affect student writing over time. Seeking to trace explicit and covert dialogic influences across middle school writers’ work, we analyze classroom texts created online to show how teachers’...
Article
Scholars of media literacy have described a range of ways adolescents use digital tools across spaces to conceptualize, produce, and share creative works. Research often focuses on the identities and experiences of young expert creators, even though activities like archiving, lurking, reading, liking, reviewing, and sharing original and transformat...
Conference Paper
College readiness, particularly with regard to academic writing, has become central to education policy. While this transition seems a natural point where college professors and secondary teachers might build the mutual understandings that "readiness" suggests, little contact occurs. This tendency is unfortunate, because both groups contribute expe...
Article
Full-text available
Building communicative competence in textual and multimodal literacies has become a linchpin of learning, of engagement with the world, and of participation in online and blended spaces. Young creators now compose online and with digital tools, often in what we call “user-generated content affinity spaces” – interest-based spaces that focus on crea...
Chapter
Writers, their practices, and their tools are mediated by the contexts in which they work. In online spaces and classroom environments, today's writers have increased access to collaborators, readers, and reviewers. Drawing on our experiences as English teacher educators and as researchers of digital literacies and online affinity spaces, this chap...
Article
Full-text available
Once writers complete a first draft, they are often encouraged to evaluate their writing and prioritize what to revise. Yet, this process can be both daunting and difficult. This study looks at how students used a semantic concept mapping tool to re-present the content and organization of their initial draft of an informational text. We examine the...
Article
Full-text available
Young fanfiction writers use the Internet to build networks of reading, writing and editing – literacy practices that are highly valued in schools, universities and workplaces. While prior research shows that online spaces frame multiple kinds of participation as legitimate, much of this work focuses on the extensive contributions of exceptional yo...
Article
Research suggests that young adults are motivated in school contexts when they believe in their own self-efficacy, have intrinsic motivation, set goals, experience agency, and demonstrate interest. To highlight how online spaces foster motivation, we focus specifically on two project-based DIY sites, Figment.com and Scratch.mit.edu. From reading an...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores how writers respond to interactions with readers and audience members in two technology-mediated writing contexts: a Hunger Games fan’s use of FanFiction.net and a classroom using Scholar to write original narrative texts. The authors look across the two spaces to analyze similarities in how the technology is used to foster in...
Article
Full-text available
Young peoples' creative production combines such activities as analysis of existing forms and genres; participation in processes including drafting, journaling, and modeling; sustained work on a particular idea; and mentor critique. In our work with a variety of settings, we have found that young artists' progress depends on their engagement in all...
Article
In this article the authors examine motivational constructs through the lens of new media-supported educational efforts. By examining a range of online, new-media-based learning communities and instructional technologies, they analyze the ways in which motivation is positioned within the field of education, how ecologies of motivation embedded with...
Article
Rubrics have become popular tools for assessing student writing both in classroom and standardized testing environments. Rubric construction and efficacy, however, is a topic that has been largely sidestepped in the literature and in teacher professional development. Composing an effective rubric — particularly for instructional or formative contex...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we further articulate connective ethnography and consider how it may add to qualitative studies of collaborative learning in naturalistic, computer-mediated settings. Despite their physical separation, members of online affinity spaces work and learn together—they construct and review artifacts and share their work across sites. To t...
Article
In order to understand the culture of the physical, virtual, and blended spheres that adolescents inhabit, we build on Gee's concept of affinity spaces. Drawing on our ethnographic research of adolescent literacies related to The Hunger Games novels, the Neopets online game, and The Sims videogames, this article explores the nature of interest-driv...
Article
In this chapter, the authors present a case study of one writer, Tom, to uncover how his writing was mediated by school-level and individual factors. The online writing environment had three major affordances for Tom in this 8th grade classroom: the online writing environment increased Tom's access to peer response, motivated him write to a higher...
Article
Full-text available
As researchers seek to make sense of young people's online literacy practices and participation, questions of methodology are important to consider. In our work to understand the culture of physical, virtual and blended spheres that adolescents inhabit, we find it necessary to expand Gee's (2004) notion of affinity spaces. In this article, we draw...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Much of the literature that developed rhetorical and cognitive viewpoints on audience suggests that when writers write with an audience in mind, imagined readers affect the writing. This paper investigates these audience effects by examining a creative writing workshop and asking how conversations with readers lead to revisions. Drawn from a case s...
Article
Full-text available
In order to understand and design learning environments that support new literacies, we must develop methods to describe the creative production of literacy artifacts. In this paper, we describe bidirectional artifact analysis, a framework that employs ethnographic observations of participants in situ, interviews over time, and the artifacts they c...
Article
Full-text available
When writers write, how do they decide to whom they are speaking? How does this decision affect writers’ cognition about writing? Their motivation to write? In this article, I review literature on cognitive and social processes of writing, conceptualizations of audience, writing across distinct learning environments, and writers’ motivations. I the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Giving students opportunities to interact with real readers of their work may not only motivate them to write, but also to take on new literacies and see themselves as writers in new ways. I detail two case studies of successful writing communities---a high school classroom and an extracurricular arts program---and describe adolescent writing pract...

Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
As a post-doc, I worked with a large team to develop Scholar, a new kind of academic, social knowledge technology. You can learn more about its latest incarnation here: https://newlearningonline.com/scholar. With several colleagues, I helped to design features, study how students and teachers used this tool, and explore implications for classrooms.
Project
While the transition from high school to college seems a natural point where college professors and secondary teachers might build the mutual understandings that “college readiness” suggests, little contact occurs. This tendency is unfortunate, because both groups contribute expertise and insight about students’ writing needs. In order to build local, grounded knowledge about college writers and transitions, we invited a group of local secondary English teachers and college writing instructors to a series of School-University Dialogues. Papers in this project report on the successes and challenges of this affinity-space-based collaboration.
Archived project
In order to understand and design learning environments that support new literacies, we must develop methods to describe the creative production of literacy artifacts. In this paper, we describe bidirectional artifact analysis, a framework that employs ethnographic observations of participants in situ, interviews over time, and the artifacts they create to trace young peoples’ creative production practices. While typical descriptive analyses move forwards, we move bidirectionally—from final product backwards and from initial idea forwards—to better understand participants’ learning processes and the role of social, collaborative audiences in that learning.