Aldrin Lee

Aldrin Lee
University of the Philippines | UPD · Department of Linguistics

PhD in Korean Linguistics (문학박사; 전공: 국어학)

About

16
Publications
4,811
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24
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
21 Citations
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Publications

Publications (16)
Article
This study tackles the development of writing Filipino dictionaries by presenting critical review analyses of the three of the most current Filipino monolingual dictionaries published by the two most authoritative institutions of Filipino language: the Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino [KWF] (formerly the Institute of National Language, then became the L...
Article
A more holistic approach towards disaster risk reduction and management takes into account a “multicausal understanding of disasters” (Berg 2017). This holistic paradigm led to an increased involvement of the social sciences as well as the humanities in documenting and analyzing social and cultural factors that contribute to our general understandi...
Thesis
Full-text available
The non-canonical occurrences of –ul/lul have been organized into three: (1) the one that occurs in intransitive constructions; (2) the one that occurs in the long form of negation (LFN) and (3) the one that occurs in what we referred to as NP-split constructions (including whole-part, inalienable possession and quantifier constructions). These thr...
Conference Paper
This study explores the feasibility of Island Linguistics as a research area in the Philippines by providing case studies of what could potentially be considered as “island languages” in the archipelago. By using “Island Linguistics”, I attempt to advance the views put forward by Nash et al. (2020) and Nash, Markússon, & Bakker (2022) on the need t...
Article
This work examined three typologically distinct languages —Hindi, Khmer, and Tagalog— from a contrastive point of view. The three languages have SOV, SVO, and VSO types respectively, word order patterns that are commonly observed in world languages. This paper analyzed what type of error occurs when Korean is translated into these three languages t...
Research
Full-text available
This is a vignette about the Cuyonon word “Napuro” published online by the Living-Language-Land, a British Council-funded “platform to minority and endangered language-holders to share a word and story that reflects a relationship to land and nature.” Napuro is one of the twenty-six (26) words selected to be featured in the project. The short piece...
Preprint
Full-text available
This preprint is a slightly revised version of a manuscript submitted as a class requirement during my Doctoral studies at the Academy of Korean Studies. I am making this publicly available for people who wish to learn about the history, development, and basic features of the Korean Alphabet in one article.
Data
This foreword is written using both English and Tagalog in a more cohesive, less autonomous manner. This might of be of interest to those who are looking for brief sample data on translanguaging/translingual practices in formal writing.
Presentation
Full-text available
Maintaining a balance between hot and cold is essential to the wellbeing of the Cuyonon people. Any tension between these two may cause several maladies, all encompassed by the general term pasma. Tan (1987) noted that the term pasma is recorded for all Christian groups, as well as for acculturated Muslim and tribal groups in the Philippines. Its u...
Article
Full-text available
This is a brief essay about the Korean word for “bittersweet”. This is not a research article. It has been published under the “Travel Narratives” category in the journal "Asian Studies: Critical Perspectives on Asia”: https://www.asj.upd.edu.ph/index.php/archive/147-asian-studies-journal-critical-perspectives-asia53-2-2017
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Language is one important medium utilized to render biases against women in human society. This paper examines how pejorative naming is used to abase contemporary Korean women, focusing on the newly-coined words (sinjo-eo) that are generated to ridicule them. This paper shows that pejorative naming serves as Korean men’s rhetoric against a Korean w...
Thesis
Full-text available
This study is both an attempt to understand the nature of Cuyonon’s non-verbal constructions, and an exploration of the applicability of Minimalist Program in describing the grammar of Cuyonon’s non-verbal constructions. Cuyonon, the language under study, is a former lingua franca of Palawan. Linguistic studies on the Cuyonon language have been sca...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This is a parallel corpus translation project aimed to train AI language translation system from Korean into foreign languages.
Project
This project explores the feasibility of Island Linguistics as a research area in the Philippines. It investigates cases of what could potentially be considered as “island languages” in the archipelago. By using “Island Linguistics”, I attempt to advance the views put forward by Nash et al. (2020) and Nash, Markússon, & Bakker (2021) on the need to disentangle the study of linguistic forms and processes shaped in an island environment from the more established area of Island Studies and draw more attention towards investigations of topography-driven properties of Philippine languages. Building upon the initial criteria for an island language proposed by Nash et al. (2020), I developed a questionnaire that focuses on domains where the interplay between the language and the island is expected to be more pronounced. I examined five island-spoken Philippine languages that come from different microgroups—selected largely in consideration of their “island” features. These languages are Agutaynen (AGN), Bolinao (SMK), Cuyonon (CYO), Kagayanen (CGC), and Porohanon (PRH). The data from these languages, first presented at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (May 18-20, 2022) suggest a robust relationship between “islandness” and language, as shown by the former being deeply entrenched in the languages’ semantic system, frames of spatial reference, and social practices related to language use. My findings support the existence of unique island language features in the Philippine context making this study a viable baseline inquiry for a more extensive documentation of island languages in the archipelago.