Alberto Canarini

Alberto Canarini
Kyoto University | Kyodai · Center for Ecological Research

PhD

About

30
Publications
10,346
Reads
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847
Citations
Introduction
I currently work at the Center for Ecological Research at Kyoto University. Previously I worked at the Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science, at the University of Vienna. I do research in Soil Science and Ecology, and I am particularly interested in the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems. My current project focuses on the plant-microbe interactions in regulating C and N cycling.
Additional affiliations
March 2017 - present
University of Vienna
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2010 - April 2011
Queen Mary, University of London
Position
  • internship
March 2009 - April 2009
United States Department of Agriculture
Position
  • internship
Education
March 2013 - February 2017
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Biogeochemistry
October 2009 - December 2011
University of Ferrara
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
September 2006 - October 2009
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Long-term soil warming and nitrogen (N) availability have been shown to affect microbial biomass and community composition. Altered assimilation patterns of recent plant-derived C and changes in soil C stocks following warming as well as increased N availability are critical in mediating the direction and magnitude of these community shifts. A ¹³C...
Article
Depolymerization of high-molecular weight organic nitrogen (N) represents the major bottleneck of soil N cycling and yet is poorly understood compared to the subsequent inorganic N processes. Given the importance of organic N cycling and the rise of global change, we investigated the responses of soil protein depolymerization and microbial amino ac...
Article
Tundra ecosystems hold large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM), likely due to low temperatures limiting rates of microbial SOM decomposition more than those of SOM accumulation from plant primary productivity and microbial necromass inputs. Here we test the hypotheses that distinct tundra vegetation types and their carbon supply to characteristic...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is altering the frequency and severity of drought events. Recent evidence indicates that drought may produce legacy effects on soil microbial communities. However, it is unclear whether precedent drought events lead to ecological memory formation, i.e., the capacity of past events to influence current ecosystem response trajectories....
Article
Full-text available
Microbial community analysis via marker gene amplicon sequencing has become a routine method in the field of soil research. In this perspective, we discuss technical challenges and limitations of amplicon sequencing and present statistical and experimental approaches that can help addressing the spatio-temporal complexity of soil and the high diver...
Article
Full-text available
Photosynthesis and soil respiration represent the two largest fluxes of CO2 in terrestrial ecosystems and are tightly linked through belowground carbon (C) allocation. Drought has been suggested to impact the allocation of recently assimilated C to soil respiration, however, it is largely unknown how drought effects are altered by a future warmer c...
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Microbial growth and carbon use efficiency (CUE) are central to the global carbon cycle, as microbial remains form soil organic matter. We investigated how future global changes may affect soil microbial growth, respiration, and CUE. We aimed to elucidate the soil microbial response to multiple climate change drivers across the growing season and w...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrification is a fundamental process in terrestrial nitrogen cycling. However, detailed information on how climate change affects the structure of nitrifier communities is lacking, specifically from experiments in which multiple climate change factors are manipulated simultaneously. Consequently, our ability to predict how soil nitrogen (N) cycli...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Paddy soil as a major component of cropland, plays an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle and favors carbon sequestration especially in southern China. Soil microorganisms are central to the conversion of organic matter into SOC, yet the mechanisms underlying the paddy management at long time scales remain largely unknown, including micro...
Article
Full-text available
Soil microbial physiology controls the large fluxes of C to the atmosphere, thus, improving our ability to accurately quantify microbial physiology in soil is essential. However, current methods to determine microbial C metabolism require liquid water addition, which makes it practically impossible to measure microbial physiology in dry soil sample...
Article
Full-text available
Root exudation is an important process determining plant interactions with the soil environment. Many studies have linked this process to soil nutrient mobilization. Yet, it remains unresolved how exudation is controlled and how exactly and under what circumstances plants benefit from exudation. The majority of root exudates including primary metab...
Data
Here is the video podcast explaining the findings of the paper. You can download the video below and also have a look at the post on the Journal of Ecology Blog: https://jecologyblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/15/harper-prize-highly-commended-papers-2017-plant-soil-interactions-part-2
Article
Full-text available
Drought is predicted to increase in many areas of the world with consequences for soil carbon (C) dynamics. Plant litter, root exudates and microbial biomass can be used as C substrates to form organo-mineral complexes. Drought effects on plants and microbes could potentially compromise these relative stable soil C pools, by reducing plant C inputs...
Article
Drought is one of the most important climate change factors, but its effects on ecosystems are little understood. While known to influence soil carbon (C) cycling, it remains unresolved if altered rainfall patterns induced by climate change will stimulate positive feedbacks of CO2 into the atmosphere. Using a meta-analysis frame-work including 1495...
Article
1. Drought induces changes in the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycle but most plant species have limited flexibility to take up nutrients under such variable or unbalanced N and P availability. Both the degree of flexibility in plant N:P ratio and of root symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi might control plant resistance to drought-...
Article
It is becoming increasingly clear that plant roots can impact the decomposition of existing soil C in the rhizosphere. Studies under controlled conditions suggest this impact may be plant-species dependent, but whether this is the case in natural conditions or what factors underlie this variation is mostly unknown. 2.With a novel field-based isotop...
Article
Drought is predicted to increase in many areas of the world, which can greatly influence soil microbial community structure and C stabilization. Increasing soil carbon (C) stabilization is an important strategy to mitigate climate change effects, but the underlying processes promoting C stabilization are still unclear. Microbes are an important con...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aims The commonly observed trade-off between plant water use efficiency (WUE) and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) has been attributed to physiological constraints in the leaf. We examined if a similar trade-off can occur between WUE and phosphorus use efficiency (PUE) and if changes in NUE and PUE in response to water and nutrient supp...
Presentation
Drought periods are expected to increase over the next decades putting the sustainability of forage production at stake. Beside direct water stress effects on plant survival and growth, soil moisture reduction also affects plant mineral nutrition by reducing N and P uptake and mobility. These drought induced-changes in soil nutrient availability gr...
Article
Numerous compounds are exuded by roots that play a central role in microbial decomposition and stabilization of soil carbon. The release of root exudates is sensitive to drought, but it is unclear how compound-specific exudates are related to drought-induced changes in plant metabolism. We investigated drought effects on root exudate quality and qu...
Presentation
Stoichiometric homeostasis represents the ability of an organism to maintain constant chemical elements despite variations in the environment and is a powerful mechanism involved in the maintenance of ecosystem functioning, especially under climate change. For example, drought directly increases soil N:P ratio, and consequently influences plant N:P...
Article
Full-text available
The stems and roots of the semiarid shrub guayule, Parthenium argentatum, contain a significant amount of natural rubber. Rubber accumulates in guayule when plants are vegetatively and reproductively dormant, complicating the relationship between growth/reproduction and product synthesis. To evaluate the factors regulating the partitioning of carbo...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Does anyone know a way to include an experimental design with 3 time replicates and 2 soil depth all in the same Path Analysis? I'm using Mplus, and it gives you the option of nesting. So I nested time into individuals to correct for dependency between time reps. But I also have two soil depth. As I would like to include both depth, I need to find a way to correct for the dependency between them. I excluded to do multigroup analysis as the two groups are dependent. Any suggestion?

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Goal: We would like to invite you to contribute to the session ‘ Responses of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to environmental stress and climate change’ (https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU21/session/38726) at the EGU General Assembly 2021 (vEGU: Gather Online 19-30 April 2021). Terrestrial ecosystems are being exposed to warming and to more frequent and intense drought and rainfall events as a result of climate change. Such changes can have strong implications for biogeochemical cycling and the functioning of soils. Understanding the mechanisms that control the responses to environmental stress is critical for improving predictions on the resistance and resilience of terrestrial ecosystems on a changing world. The aim of this session is to bridge the knowledge of different disciplines to elucidate the processes and feedbacks underpinning the biogeochemical response to climate change, with emphasis on warming, drought, and drying-rewetting events. This session will give a broad overview of empirical and modelling studies across different scales, considering how climate change affects terrestrial biogeochemistry and the interactions between soil microorganisms, plants and fauna. We will focus on the resilience and the associated recovery dynamics of soil biota to environmental disturbances, as well as on their resistance or adaptation mechanisms to climate change. We will bring together researchers from different environments and create a discussion platform to review the current state-of-the-art, identify knowledge gaps, share ideas, and tackle new challenges in the field. Date: 19 - 30 April 2020 Please submit your abstract before January 13, 2021. Do not hesitate to contact us in case of any questions. We are looking forward to meeting you in Vienna. Albert, Alberto, Lucia, Lettice and Ainara
Project
We would like to invite you to contribute to the session ‘Resistance and resilience of soil biogeochemical cycles to climate and land use change perturbations’ (https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2020/session/35047) at the EGU General Assembly 2020 (03-08 May, Vienna, Austria). Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in biogeochemical carbon (C) and nutrient cycling. Yet, microbial responses, either direct or indirect, to changing environmental conditions can affect ecosystem functioning and stability. This session will present advances on the role of soil microorganisms on ecosystem resistance/resilience to environmental disturbances. We will focus on the effects of climate and land use changes, including continuous changes (e.g., rise in atmospheric CO2 or temperatures) or pulse events (e.g., drought and fire), on soil microbial cycling of carbon and nutrients. Topics presented will include, but are not limited to, effects of warming, elevated atmospheric CO2, nutrient deposition, drought, flooding, fire and extreme heatwaves on microbial nutrient cycling. Attention will be given to the resistance or adaptation mechanisms of soil microorganisms during single or repeated disturbances, as well as to their resilience and associated temporal recovery dynamics of C and nutrient cycles after the end of a disturbance. In particular, studies that focus on nutrient balances and stoichiometric relationships will be highlighted. Overall, this session will give a broad overview about the effects of climate change and human impact on the functioning of the soil system as an important integrated component of all terrestrial ecosystems. Date: 3 May 2020 - 8 May 2020 Invited speaker: Ashish Malik (University of Aberdeen) Please submit your abstract before January 15, 2020. Financial support for traveling can be granted until December 1, 2019. Do not hesitate to contact us in case of any questions. We are looking forward to meeting you in Vienna. Alberto, Lucia and Feike
Archived project
The global climate is changing dramatically due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In South-Australia, a trend of prolonged periods without rain, alternated with increasing rainfall intensity, has already emerged during the last 50 years and is likely to continue during this century. More extreme rainfall patterns affect plant growth, which can lead to an increase in fire frequency and intensity. Drought and fire impact on the relative supply of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to plants and microbes with contrasting effects depending on soils types. Because plants and microbes have limited flexibility to take up N and P under conditions of unbalanced supply, drought and fire affecting N:P stoichiometry can have large impacts on primary productivity, plant community structure and carbon sequestration. However, nothing is really known about the impacts of drought and fire on plant and microbes competition for nutrients in grasslands. By using field and glasshouse experiments, this project aim at assessing limitation of soil N and P for plant growth and microbes under climate change (drought and fire), depending on rainfall variability and soil properties in Australian grasslands. Isotopes tracers (15N, 32P) will be used to determine the uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus by plants and microbes under drought and fire. Moreover, several ecosystem functions will be measured, such as litter decomposition, soil respiration and plant productivity, in order to related changes in soil N:P stoichiometry, plant and microbes uptakes and grassland functioning and sustainability. Collected data will be then integrated into a model to determine how independent fluxes of N and P affect the relationships between soil available, plant and microbial N:P ratios under conditions of drought and fire. Because climate change can dramatically alter the relative availability of N and P, incorporating stoichiometric constraints into models is critical in predicting ecosystem responses to climate change, specifically to drought and fire that have perhaps some of the largest impacts on reshaping the Australian landscape. This project will identify important mechanisms and provide tools to improve predictions about drought and fire impacts on plant productivity but also on soil nutrient availability, that will have important implications for grassland management.