Albert George Orr

Albert George Orr
Griffith University · Environmental Futures Research Institute

Doctor of Philosophy

About

120
Publications
68,223
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1,914
Citations
Citations since 2017
36 Research Items
792 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (120)
Article
Full-text available
A checklist of the dragonflies and damselflies occurring in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India (including Andaman and Nicobar Islands), Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka is presented. In total 588 (including 559 full species) taxa are known to occur in the region of which 251 taxa (species & subspecies) are single country endemics. Recent taxonomic changes rele...
Article
In certain butterfly species males attach a large external mating plug termed a sphragis to the female abdomen during mating. This is derived from male accessory secretions and covers the female ostium bursae and surrounding areas, thus preventing or delaying remating. Specimens of the poorly studied parnassiines, Hypermnestra helios, Archon apolli...
Article
The final instar larva of the genus Archineura Kirby, 1894 is described for the first time, based on a specimen of the Chinese endemic species Archineura incarnata (Karsch, 1892) collected from Mt. Nankunshan, Guangdong Province, China. The larva is distinguished by several characters, including its moderately slender build combined with the distin...
Article
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We describe the larva of Matronoides cyaneipennis Förster, 1897, based on an incomplete , dried F0 specimen collected at Mt Kinabalu, Sabah, in 1964, and held at the Natural History Museum, London. Since its collection nearly 60 years ago no other specimen has come to light despite considerable searching of its habitat. Identification is by supposi...
Article
For most natural organisms, the physical, chemical and biological aspects of fluorescence emission are poorly understood. For example, to the best of our knowledge, fluorescence from the transparent wings of any of the 3000 known species of cicadas has never been reported in the literature. These wings are known to exhibit anti-reflective propertie...
Article
Full-text available
The tropical and subtropical rainforests of eastern Australia are a major component of the Forests of East Australia global hotspot. Australian rainforests are maintained orographically and are embedded within vast tracts of pyrogenic open forest and woodland. Australian tropical and subtropical forests stretch over 24° of latitude from Cape York,...
Article
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An account of a personal meeting with Wilhelm Stüber, in Hollandia, which casts light upon his character and relationship with his employers.
Article
The final stadium larvae of Huosoma latiloba (Yu, Yang & Bu, 2008) and Huosoma tinctipenne (McLachlan, 1894) from Yunnan Province, China are described and illustrated for the first time, with diagnostic differences between the two species identified. While no morphological characters separating the adults of this genus, and the closely related west...
Preprint
Full-text available
In spite of the crucial role it is believed to play in nature, fluorescence in natural organisms remains under-investigated from optical, chemical and biological perspectives. One example is the transparent wings of insects from the order Hemiptera: fluorescence emission has so far not been reported in any of the 3,000 described species of the supe...
Article
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This article discusses the publication history of the classic 'Butterflies of the Malay Peninsula' and reviews the latest fifth edition revised by George and Nancy van der Poorten.
Article
The genus Tyriobapta Kirby, 1889, includes three species, all originally described from Borneo. The genotype, T. torrida is common in much of Sundaland where it inhabits a variety of standing and slowly flowing freshwater habitats in forest. The two other species, T. kuekenthali (Karsch, 1900) and T. laidlawi Ris, 1919, are much less often encounte...
Article
The larvae of Caliphaea angka Hämäläinen, 2003 and Mnais gregoryi Fraser, 1924 are described and illustrated for the first time from Erhai lake Basin, Yunnan Province, China. Notes on their habitat are provided. This paper represents the first verified description of the larva of Caliphaea Hagen in Selys, 1859.
Book
Dragonflies and damselflies are conspicuous insects: many are large and brightly coloured. They are also valuable indicators of environmental wellbeing. A detailed knowledge of the dragonfly fauna is therefore an important basis for decisions about environmental protection and management. This comprehensive guide to the Australian dragonfly fauna c...
Article
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Insects are reportedly experiencing widespread declines, but we generally have sparse data on their abundance. Correcting this shortfall will take more effort than professional entomologists alone can manage. Volunteer nature enthusiasts can greatly help to monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata), iconic freshwater sentinels...
Article
Full-text available
agorr@bigpond.com] In the recent Covid-19 special issue of Agrion, I described my garden pond in subtropical Queensland, Australia and its dragonfly fauna (Orr 2020), indicating my intention to study this microcosm while in 'lockdown'. Since writing that article, I continued detailed daily 1-2 hour long observations, weather permitting, from 20/3/2...
Article
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The species of Dicranomyia (Idioglochina) known from Australia are reviewed in detail and a new species, Dicranomyia (Idioglochina) caloundrae sp. n., is described. This new species from the littoral zone of a marine rocky shore at Caloundra, Queensland, is illustrated and compared with the two species previously known from Australia, and a key to...
Article
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An intensive, two-season survey of moths along an elevational transect from 200 to 1200 m above sea level was an integral part of the recent Eungella biodiversity survey. The overall results have been published elsewhere. In this paper we examine in finer detail the patterns of distribution and faunistics of one of the dominant taxa from that datas...
Article
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Explores ways of reconciling Covid-19 lockdown restrictions with fieldwork and the benefits of localised observations, especially on Odonata.
Article
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In the calopterygid damselfly Echo margarita Selys, 1853, both the generic name Echo and the specific name margarita, are demonstrated to be eponyms given in memorium to Selys' lost daughter Marguerite (1848-1852), who died in early childhood. The binomial name signifies 'memory' of Marguerite. Previously the name Echo was thought to refer to a myt...
Conference Paper
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This presentation explores the form and frequency of the sphargis in three poorly studied genera of Parnassiinae, Archon (2 spp), Hypermnestra and Sericinus. This is considered in the context of the male and female genital morphology. A sphragis is present in all four species but mostly at relatively low frequency. Reasons for this are discussed.
Article
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A new species of damselfly, Rhyacocnemis gassmanni sp. n. from Papua New Guinea, is described and illustrated from both sexes with notes on its habitat and habits. It represents the fourth species of an enigmatic genus, known from only a handful of specimens. The placement of the new species is problematical and is discussed. Introduction The zygop...
Article
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Greater than 80% of species on Earth are awaiting formal description, and simultaneously, many of these species unknown to science are becoming extinct. Here we highlight the importance and benefits of collaborating and working in interdisciplinary research groups, to improve quality and efficiency of both ecological and taxonomic research. The aim...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Australian Rainbowbird, Merops ornatus, feeds on a wide variety of insect prey, including the introduced European Honeybee, Apis mellifera. They nest in deep horizontal tunnels, favouring sandy banks as nest sites. Both sexes participate in nest construction, brooding and provisioning and often one or more other birds assist with nest provision...
Article
In some butterfly species males attach a large external mating plug termed a sphragis to the female abdomen during mating. This is derived from male accessory secretions and covers the female ostium bursae and surrounding areas, thus preventing or delaying remating. Specimens of all 12 species of the genera Zerynthia, Allancastria and Bhutanitis (L...
Article
Full-text available
To ensure that the name Papuargia stueberi luciedecknerae, described (2017) in Odonatologica 41: 283-291, is available, the type repository, inadequately presented in the original description, is stated along with a diagnosis of the subspecies.
Article
Oligoaeschna sirindhornae sp. nov. is described from a male from Sakaerat Silvicultural Research Station, Nakhon Ratchasima Province in Thailand. It is the only known Oligoaeschna species recorded from Thailand since Oligoaeschna pramoti (Yeh, 2000) and Oligoaeschna minuta (Hämäläinen & Pinratana, 1999) were transferred to the genus Sarasaeschna.
Article
Full-text available
Males of many butterfly species secrete long-lasting mating plugs to prevent their mates from copulating with other males, thus ensuring their sperm will fertilize all future eggs laid. Certain species have further developed a greatly enlarged, often spectacular, externalized plug, termed a sphragis. This distinctive structure results from complex...
Data
Table S1. Sphragis-bearing butterfly species and morphological characteristics of their sphragides
Book
Full-text available
This publication, “Common dragonflies and damselflies of Bhutan” builds on the past studies on dragonflies of the country and provides a national baseline data on this group. It provides an updated checklist of the known species along with photographs of common species of dragonflies and damselflies found in Bhutan. Currently, 110 species have been...
Article
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The Hainanese endemic damselfly, Pseudolestes mirabilis, is unique among the Odonata in having brilliant silvery-white reflective areas on the underside of the hind wings in mature males. The light reflected is easily seen to be several times brighter than that from normal white pruinescence. The hind wing upsides have a striking coppery appearance...
Article
A second species of the hitherto monotypic New Guinean genus Papuargia Lief- tinck, 1938 and a new subspecies of P. stueberi Lieftinck, 1938 are described from Papua New Guinea. These are P. brevistigma sp. nov. and P. stueberi luciedecknerae ssp. nov. The char- acters which define the genus are discussed with special reference to the labium and pe...
Article
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The damselfly Pseudolestes mirabilis reflects brilliant white on the ventral side of its hindwings and a copper-gold colour on the dorsal side. Unlike many previous investigations of odonate wings, in which colour appearances arise either from multilayer interference or from wing-membrane pigmentation, the whiteness on the wings of P. mirabilis res...
Article
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Megalestes gyalsey spec. nov. is described from a single male from Trongsa District in Bhutan. The species was discovered during field work conducted in 2015 for the Bhutan invertebrate biodiversity project. The species is named in honour of His Royal Highness Crown Prince Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, the Gyalsey of Bhutan, on the occasion of his first...
Article
Two new species of Papuagrion Ris, 1913 are described from Papua Province, Indonesia. These are P. marirobi sp .nov. from Japen Island and P. stellimontanum sp .nov., from the Star Mountains. The new species are, respectively, most close- ly allied to P. degeneratum Lieftinck and P. digitiferum Lieftinck. They bring the number of Papuagrion species...
Article
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A review of The Butterfly Fauna of Sri Lanka 2016 by George and Nancy van der Poorten
Article
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The larva of Papuagrion is described and illustrated for the first time based on two specimens collected near Goroka, Papua New Guinea. The larvae were identified by matching the mitochondrial marker COI with that of an adult specimen collected at the same locality. The larvae were found in the leaf axils of Pandanus trees which agrees with earlier...
Article
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An account of the life of Wilhelm Stüber 1877-1942, particularly with reference to his role in collecting over 100 new species of Odonata in New Guinea and his collaboration with M.A. Lieftinck. A short history of collecting in New Guinea pre 1930 is also given.
Article
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The final stadium (F) larva of Coeliccia flavostriata Laidlaw, 1918, is described and illustrated based on a mature male specimen, collected at Gunung Serapi, Sarawak, East Malaysia. The larva of Coeliccia campioni Laidlaw, 1918, is described from an immature (F-?2) female specimen from Gunung Mulu, Sarawak, East Malaysia. Larvae were identified by...
Article
Three distinctive new species of Papuagrion Ris, 1913 are described from a high altitude area (1,770–1,820 m a.s.l.) at the base of the Hindenburg Wall, Western Province, Papua New Guinea. These are P. chrysosoma sp. nov., P marijanma- toki sp. nov. and P. tydecksjuerging sp. nov.; all type material is deposited in the South Australian Museum (SAMA...
Article
The final stadium larva of Onychargia atrocyana Selys, 1865, is described and illustrated based on two female specimens collected at Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, East Malaysia. The larvae were identified by matching the mitochon- drial marker COI with that of known adult specimens from Gunung Mulu, Bintulu and Kuching in Sarawak and from Pa-...
Article
The final stadium larva of Drepanosticta ?attala Lieftinck, is described and illustrated based on a single male specimen collected at Kuala Belalong Field Studies Centre, Brunei. The larva was identified by matching the mitochondrial marker COI with that of known adult specimens. The larva presented a good match with both D. attala and D. barbatula...
Article
Full-text available
Heliocypha perforata (sensu lato) is a common stream-dwelling damselfly widespread in mainland tropical Asia. Recently a report has been published suggesting possible ovo-viviparity in this species, based on the interpretation of evidence from a short video sequence. This video is re-evaluated. The internal and external anatomy of the H. perforata...
Article
Nannophlebia leoboppi sp. nov. is described and figured based on a male specimen collected in the Star Mountains of Central New Guinea. This relatively large representative of its genus is compared with its probable nearest relative, N. antiacantha Lieftinck, 1963, which is also partially figured. The new species brings the total number of Nannophl...
Article
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This note lists butterfly prey taken during 2013 and 2014 by Rainbowbirds breeding beside Currimundi Lake, southern Queensland, as previously documented for 2012 (Orr 2013).
Article
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The dorsal surfaces of the hindwings of the dragonfly Rhyothemis resplendens (Odonata: Libellulidae) reflect a deep blue from the multilayer structure in its wing membrane. The layers within this structure are not flat, but distinctly ‘wrinkled’, with a thickness of several hundred nanometres and interwrinkle crest distances of 5 µm and greater. A...
Article
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A new species of damselfly, Palaiargia traunae sp. n. from Trauna Gap near the Baiyer River Sanctuary in Western Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea, is described and its relationships discussed. It represents the 25th species of the genus, which is confined to the island of New Guinea, the Moluccas and some intervening islands.
Article
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The small libellulid genus Rhodothemis is restricted to Asia and Australia. Two of the four included species were described relatively recently by Lohmann (1984) but much previously documented material was never re-identified and the distribution of the species in the Indo-Australian Archipelago remained poorly known. All material avail- able in th...
Article
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Moses Harris was arguably the most gifted English entomological illustrator of the 18th century. He is particularly noted for his depictions of butterflies in more or less natural positions. He also depicted Odonata and other insects and devised a colour wheel of significance in the development of colour theory. His Odonata images are typically als...
Article
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Four new species of Palaiargia from New Guinea, P. benkeni, P. clarillii, P. quandti and P. tydecksjuerging, are described and figured. Maps are provided of the known distributions of all species of the genus which occurs in the Moluccas and on the main island of New Guinea. Previous unpublished records are provided for P. carnifex, P. c. ceyx, P....
Article
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Pericnemis triangularis Laidlaw was described on the basis of a single / from Bettotan in NE Borneo. Specimens from Brunei and neighbouring Sarawak previously referred to this sp. are reappraised with reference to the type and described as Pericnemis dowi sp. n. P. kiautarum sp. n. from Sabah, N. Borneo is described and figured based on a single ?...
Article
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The final instar larva of Heliaeschna idae Brauer is described and figured for the first time based on the exuvia from an advanced female larva collected in Sarawak, Borneo (East Malaysia). It is compared with the known larvae of the genus and is concluded to be most closely allied to Heliaeschna simplicia Karsch, with which it shares a unique stru...
Article
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The diet of a family of Rainbowbirds (Merops ornatus Latham) nesting in the Currimundi Environmental Park, southern Queensland, was investigated over approximately four months. Three birds were involved, a breeding pair and a helper male. Insect prey was monitored photographically with 836 items being recorded. The recorded diet of the adults befor...
Article
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An updated classification and numbers of described genera and species (until 2010) are provided up to family level. We argue for conserving the family-group names Chlorocyphidae, Euphaeidae and Dicteriadidae, as well as retaining Epiophlebiidae in the suborder Anisozygoptera. Pseudostigmatidae and New World Protoneuridae are sunk in Coenagrionidae...
Conference Paper
Optimised multilayer structures and efficient coating designs have been found in several species of damselfly. We discuss these structures and the associated mechanisms responsible for the bright optical effects which they exhibit.
Article
Full-text available
The / larva is figured and described for the first time, based on exuviae from a reared specimen and an F larva collected from runnels in peat swamp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia. The larva is compared with those of Heliaeschna filostyla Martin, 1906 and H. uninervulata Martin, 1909, the only other spp. of the genus so far described, as well as certa...
Article
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The hind wings of males of the damselfly Matronoides cyaneipennis exhibit iridescence that is blue dorsally and green ventrally. These structures are used semiotically in agonistic and courtship display. Transmission electron microscopy reveals these colours are due to two near-identical 5-layer distributed Bragg reflectors, one placed either side...
Article
To ensure that the name D. simuni, described (2012) in Odonatologica 41: 283-291, is available, the type repository, omitted from the original description, is stated along with a diagnosis of the species
Article
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Recent studies show a remarkable scarcity of faunal exchange events between Australia and New Guinea in the Pleistocene despite the presence of a broad land connection for long periods. This is attributed to unfavourable conditions in the connecting area associated with the long established northern Australian Monsoon Climate. This would be expecte...
Article
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The genus Paramecocnemis Lieftinck, previously known from two species from northern New Guinea, is redefined on the basis of new material recently collected in the Sepik Basin and Western Province of Papua New Guinea. Three new species are described: P. spinosus sp. n. and P. similis sp. n. are quite close to the generic type species, P. erythrosti...
Article
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The new sp. is described from Gunung Mulu National Park in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo and compared with its closest congeners, Drepanosticta barbatula Lieftinck and D. drusilla Lieftinck, which are also refigured. New distribution records for the latter 2 spp. are documented.
Article
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Telosticta new genus is described from Borneo and Palawan, with genotype Protosticta feronia Lieftinck. Other previously named species transferred to Telosticta are Drepanosticta dupophila Lieftinck, Protosticta paruatia van Tol, and P. tubau Dow. Eleven new species are described: T. belalongensis, T. berawan, T. bidayuh, T. janeus, T. dayak, T. ga...
Article
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For the last 15 years, publications on Australian butterflies have most often used species-group names with their original spelling, regardless of generic placement, sometimes violating the requirements of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Recently, two new checklists of Australian butterflies have been published in which gender ag...
Article
Full-text available
The larva of Heliaeschna uninervulata is described and figured for the first time. Its characters mostly fall within the limits of variation of Gynacantha spp. Comparison of the larval characters of H. filostyla, the only other member of the genus for which the larva is known, suggests that it is not congeneric with H. uninervulata.
Article
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A new species of damselfly, Arrhenocnemis parvibullis (Odonata: Platycnemididae), from the Muller Range of Papua New Guinea is described and its habits and habitat discussed. It represents the third species of this distinctive genus, known from just 16 specimens. The recently discovered female of A. amphidactylis is described for the frst time.
Book
Full-text available
ABSTRACT: The world over people love butterflies but few understand much more about them than their physical beauty. Butterflies of Australia offers a unique guide to help identify the nearly 400 species to which our continent plays host but with its focus on living butterflies, it is much more than an identification guide. Within its pages is a co...
Article
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The F stadium larva of both sexes of Tetracanthagyna plagiata is described and figured based on exuviae from which confirmed adult specimens had been reared. Larvae were originally collected in small, slow forest streams in Singapore, and in captivity were fed on local shrimp and small fish species. The known larvae of Tetracanthagyna species, T. d...
Article
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In April 2010, unusually large proportions of small individuals were recorded in the following butterfly species: Papilio aegeus, Tirumala hamata and Hypolimnas bolina. This trend was not evident in Euploea core. Starvation following earlier population surges may explain this trend. No Yes
Article
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A list of genera presently included in Megapodagrionidae and Pseudolestidae is provided, together with information on species for which the larva has been described. Based on the shape of the gills, the genera for which the larva is known can be arranged into four groups: (1) species with inflated sack-like gills with a terminal filament; (2) speci...
Article
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The larva of the south-east Asian megapodagrionid, Podolestes orientalis, is described and figured. Specimens were collected from shallow forest pools lined with large dead leaves in secondary lowland forest. Final and earlier stadium larvae were found concentrated around the edges of pools in very shallow water. Larvae sometimes perched in exposed...
Article
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The reproductive behaviour of Libcllago semiopaca was studied on a swift-flowing shallow forest stream in Brunei. Females oviposited just below the water-line, commonly in groups, only on large, firm-textured, semi-submerged logs, usually guarded by males. Both sexes were very sedentary. Suitable sites, with good illumination and deep deposits of f...