Alan Goodman

Alan Goodman
Hampshire College · School of Natural Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

192
Publications
57,075
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
7,051
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 1985 - present
Hampshire College
Position
  • Professor (former Dean of Faculty)

Publications

Publications (192)
Article
Full-text available
Building a New Biocultural Synthesis: Political Economic Perspectives in Human Biology called for an integration of political economy with ecological and adaptability perspectives in biocultural anthropology. A major goal of this volume was to explore the utility of including political‐economic and sociocultural processes in analyses of human biolo...
Chapter
Biocultural anthropology is a broad and holistic approach to the study of Human biology within social and cultural contexts. A critical Biocultural approach furthers these considerations by paying particular attention to how historical and political economic forces help shape social contexts and biological variation, as well as the research process...
Chapter
Health disparities by ‘race’ are large, consistent, and persistent. These disparities are attributed to two divergent causal pathways, either (1) genetic differences in disease susceptibility among races or (2) variation among groups socially defined as ‘races,’ deriving from lived experiences of discrimination, including both subtle and more overt...
Research
Watch online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oa0lS0ZMxxU While it is typically understood that identities are multiple and fluid, the same instability and fluidity applies to human biology. The instability of biology makes the use of “racial categories” particularly problematic and shows that the notion of closed and isolated groups is typically...
Article
This article provides a critical historical overview of the stress concept in bioarcheological research and critically evaluates the term "health" in reference to skeletal samples. Stress has a considerable history in 20th century physiological research, and the term has reached a critical capacity of meaning. Stress was operationalized around a se...
Article
In the recent past, human biology in anthropology was typically theorized as separate from—even in tension with—culture. In contrast, by further theorizing the social, political, and ecological processes through which what I call “cultural–biologicals” dialectically come into being, I foreground the restlessness and site specificity of human biolog...
Article
Distributional analysis of trace metals in biological tissue provides important archived toxicological and nutritional information. In this study, lead, strontium, zinc, and lithium concentrations were measured in dental tissue using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Teeth from two populations were sampled: an...
Article
Featuring new and engaging essays by noted anthropologists and illustrated with full color photos, RACE: Are We So Different? is an accessible and fascinating look at the idea of race, demonstrating how current scientific understanding is often inconsistent with popular notions of race. Taken from the popular national public education project and m...
Article
Full-text available
Because the dental hard tissues commence development in the 13th week in utero and once formed are essentially inert, they may provide unique windows onto environmental and physiological changes during pregnancy and early life. We review the general potential of teeth as biomonitors and then the development of laser ablation-inductively coupled-pla...
Chapter
Full-text available
IntroductionEmergence of a Critical Biocultural ApproachCritical Biocultural Approaches in Studies of Human HealthNew DirectionsConclusions References
Article
Over the past 40 years, tourism-based economic development has transformed social and economic conditions in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We address how these changes have influenced anthropometric indicators of growth and nutritional status in Yalcoba, a Mayan farming community involved in the circular migration of labor in the tourist economy....
Book
Anthropology, with its dual emphasis on biology and culture, is--or should be--the discipline most suited to the study of the complex interactions between these aspects of our lives. Unfortunately, since the early decades of this century, biological and cultural anthropology have grown distinct, and a holistic vision of anthropology has suffered. T...
Article
Despite attempts to use zinc (Zn) concentrations in hard tissues to comment upon the degree of carnivory in past populations, zinc has yielded inconsistent trophic level effects. The question of what, if anything, zinc in human enamel reveals regarding past diets is the focus of this research. We test whether the zinc content of deciduous tooth ena...
Article
The Barker hypothesis asserts that stressful events early in the life history of an individual have negative health consequences later in adulthood. The hypothesis initially focused on prenatal stressors as indicated by birth weight and related outcomes. This initial concern with the fetal phase of development led to its description as the “fetal p...
Article
: Joseph Jones is contributing editor for the AAA's RACE Project column in Anthropology News.
Chapter
Alan H Goodman was the President of the American Anthropological Association (2005–2007) and Professor of Biological Anthropology at Hampshire College, Amherst, Massachusetts, where he is the former Dean of Natural Sciences. He is also an Associate Director of the New York African Burial Ground project and a recipient of the Anti-Defamation League'...
Article
Full-text available
Article
The Archaeology of Disease, 2nd. ed. Charlotte Roberts and Keith Manchester. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1995 (cloth), x + 243 pp.Palaeopathology of Aboriginal Australians: Health and Disease across a Hunter-Gatherer Continent. Stephen Webb. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995 (cloth), xii + 324 pp.
Article
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Microspatial analyses of the trace element composition of dental enamel are made possible using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Fine spatial resolution, multielement capabilities, and minimal sample destruction make this technique particularly well-suited for documenting the distribution of elements in seque...
Article
Human dental enamel is composed of sequentially calcifying growth layers that can provide an archival record of temporal changes such as past pollution events and changes in elemental nutrition. Human teeth and bones alike are mainly made out of calcium and a phosphorous rich crystalline building block called hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]. Dival...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past three decades, tourism-based economic development has transformed social and economic conditions in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Mayan communities have become directly involved in the changing economy as the main source of inexpensive labor for construction and service jobs at tourism centers, and as sites of ecotourism and archeoto...
Article
Full-text available
To examine maternal intake of a mildly alcoholic beverage (pulque) during pregnancy and lactation, and its potential effect on postpartum child growth and attained size. A prospective cohort study that followed mothers (during pregnancy and lactation) and their offspring (from birth to approximately 57 months of age). Six villages in rural, central...
Article
Full-text available
Human tooth enamel provides a nearly permanent and chronological record of an individual's nutritional status and anthropogenic trace metal exposure during development; it might thus provide an excellent bio archive. We investigated the micro-spatial distribution of trace metals (Cu, Fe, Mg, Sr, Pb, and Zn) in 196 x 339 microm2 raster pattern areas...
Book
The so-called science wars pit science against culture, and nowhere is the struggle more contentious-or more fraught with paradox-than in the burgeoning realm of genetics. A constructive response, and a welcome intervention, this volume brings together biological and cultural anthropologists to conduct an interdisciplinary dialogue that provokes an...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
There is a paradoxical relationship between "race" and genetics. Whereas genetic data were first used to prove the validity of race, since the early 1970s they have been used to illustrate the invalidity of biological races. Indeed, race does not account for human genetic variation, which is continuous, complexly structured, constantly changing, an...
Article
HAPPENINGS AND HEARSAY: EXPERIENCES OF A BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGIST. By Gabriel W. Lasker. Detroit: Savoyard Books, Wayne State University Press. 1999. ISBN 0-8143-2840-7. $30.00 (cloth).

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)