Akira Nagamori

Akira Nagamori
Salk Institute for Biological Studies · Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory

Doctor of Philosophy

About

6
Publications
1,348
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52
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
52 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Variability in muscle force is a hallmark of healthy and pathological human behavior. Predominant theories of sensorimotor control assume ‘motor noise’ leads to force variability and its ‘signal dependence’ (variability in muscle force whose amplitude increases with intensity of neural drive). Here, we demonstrate that the two proposed mechanisms f...
Article
Full-text available
Involuntary force variability below 15 Hz arises from, and is influenced by, many factors including descending neural drive, proprioceptive feedback, and mechanical properties of muscles and tendons. However, their potential interactions that give rise to the well-structured spectrum of involuntary force variability are not well understood due to a...
Article
Full-text available
Key points: In tonic, isometric, plantarflexion contractions, physiological tremor increases as the ankle joint becomes plantarflexed. Modulation of physiological tremor as a function of muscle stretch differs from that of the stretch reflex amplitude. Amplitude of physiological tremor may be altered as a function of reflex pathway gains. Healthy...
Article
Full-text available
Eccentric contractions can affect musculotendon mechanical properties and disrupt muscle proprioception, but their behavioral consequences are poorly understood. We tested whether repeated eccentric contractions of plantarflexor muscles of one leg affected the dexterity of either leg. Twenty healthy male subjects (27.3 ± 4.0 yrs) compressed a compl...
Article
Full-text available
Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force...

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