A.J.A.M. Temme

A.J.A.M. Temme
Kansas State University | KSU · Department of Geography

PhD

About

127
Publications
27,788
Reads
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2,383
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - October 2013
University of Colorado Boulder
Position
  • Researcher
December 2009 - January 2016
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (127)
Article
Landscape position co-determines soil formation, and hence soil properties are related to landscape position. In many landscapes, the importance of landscape position is large, and thus relations between soil properties and landscape position are strong. This is particularly true for agricultural landscapes, where tillage has smoothed over local va...
Presentation
Full-text available
Discusses opportunities for disaggregation of legacy soil maps, especially the US SSURGO map
Poster
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I ask here how far we are from quantifying soil carbon storage rates for proglacial areas at the global scale using the rate of carbon stock increase from soil chronosequences. This requires relating estimates of rates from many locations to globally available datasets reflecting climate, lithology and topography Towards a global assessment of carb...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Peatlands are sensitive ecosystems that store carbon and water and support biodiversity. Currently, European peatlands are threatened by climate change and exploitation. In this study, we show that many landscape settings may support both wetland ecosystems on thick peat soils and forest ecosystems on thin organic soils. Both ecosystem...
Article
The weathering mechanisms that cause fragmentation of particles in the transition from bedrock to saprolite and regolith are little known. Yet, their quantification is an important missing link in the development of critical zones. To provide observational underpinning of mechanistic inference, we sampled and analysed the vertically changing partic...
Chapter
Soils and landslides are intimately related, particularly for shallow landslides that occur in soil or weathered bedrock. Although landslides can occur in practically all soil types, maps of soil types and soil properties are often and successfully used as copredictors in statistically based landslide susceptibility modeling. This chapter explores...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews quantitative modeling of landscape evolution. Quantitative modeling is contrasted with conceptual or physical modeling, and four categories of model studies are presented. Procedural studies focus on model experimentation. Descriptive studies use models to learn about landscapes in general. Postdictive and predictive try to cor...
Article
Full-text available
There is limited knowledge about preservation of aggradation phases in Quaternary fluvial records. Previous numerical modelling of erosion and deposition in Late Quaternary Allier river (France), generated the prediction that this river has reach‐specific fluvial dynamics related to climate‐driven tributary sediment‐flux dynamics. To test this pred...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have substantially altered soil and landscape patterns and properties due to agricultural use, with severe impacts on biodiversity, carbon sequestration and food security. These impacts are difficult to quantify , because we lack data on long-term changes in soils in natural and agricultural settings and available simulation methods are not...
Article
Full-text available
Landslides often happen where they have already occurred in the past. The potential of landslides to reduce or enhance conditions for further landsliding has long been recognized and has often been reported, but the mechanisms and spatial and temporal scales of these processes have previously received little specific attention. Despite a prepondera...
Article
In theory, two separate regions with the same soil-forming factors should develop similar soil conditions. This theoretical finding has been used in digital soil mapping (DSM) to extrapolate a model from one area to another, which usually does not work out well. One reason for failure could be that most of these studies used empirical methods. Stru...
Article
Full-text available
This contribution tests the added value of including landslide path dependency in statistically-based landslide susceptibility modelling. A conventional pixel-based landslide susceptibility model was compared with a model that includes landslide path dependency, and with a purely path dependent landslide susceptibility model. To quantify path depen...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Bedrock rivers erode horizontally to create wide bedrock valleys, and wider valleys are created by bigger rivers and in softer rocks. Bedrock valleys made of soft rock widen through a different process than valleys in hard rock, but so far there has been little research on how these distinct processes impact the development o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. Humans have substantially altered soil and landscape patterns and properties due to agricultural use, with severe impacts on biodiversity, carbon sequestration and food security. These impacts are difficult to quantify, because we lack data on long-term changes in soils in natural and agricultural settings and available simulation methods...
Article
Full-text available
This contribution tests the added value of including landslide path dependency in statistically-based landslide susceptibility modelling. A conventional pixel-based landslide susceptibility model was compared with a model that includes landslide path dependency, and with a purely path dependent landslide susceptibility model. To quantify path depen...
Article
Full-text available
Humans triggered or accelerated erosion processes since prehistoric times through agricultural practices. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) is widely used to quantify phases and rates of the corresponding landscape change, by measuring the last moment of daylight exposure of sediments. However, natural and anthropogenic mixing processes, such...
Article
Two principal groups of processes shape mass fluxes from and into a soil: vertical profile development and lateral soil redistribution. Periods having predominantly progressive soil forming processes (soil profile development) alternate with periods having predominantly regressive processes (erosion). As a result, short-term soil redistribution — y...
Article
Full-text available
Prediction of ecosystem responses to global environmental change is a pressing scientific challenge of major societal relevance. Many ecosystems display nonlinear responses to environmental change, and may even undergo practically irreversible ‘regime shifts’ that initiate ecosystem collapse. Recently, early warning signals based on spatiotemporal...
Chapter
Glaciers in the Alps and other mountain regions are widely retreating. This contribution focusses on the soils that are forming in the proglacial areas. These soils are important because of the hydrological and ecological effect they will have in future glacierless valleys. A geographical approach is taken that attempts to explain differences in ra...
Article
In this study, we use before and after flood observations of bed sediment lithology to determine how the lithological composition of bed sediment changes in response to an extreme flood event and use the post-flood measurements and observations to estimate values of critical shear stresses needed to erode shale bedrock and protective bank vegetatio...
Article
The ability of water to transport and transform soil materials is one of the main drivers of soil and landscape development. In turn, soil and landscape properties determine how water is distributed in soil landscapes. Understanding the complex dynamics of this co-evolution of soils, landscapes and the hydrological system is fundamental in adapting...
Article
Full-text available
Land use change is an important determinant of hydrological processes and is known to affect hydrological parameters such as runoff volume, flood frequency, base flow, and the partitioning into surface flow and subsurface flow. The main objective of this research was to assess the magnitude of the effect of land use changes on runoff parameters, us...
Article
Full-text available
Landslide susceptibility modelling — a crucial step towards the assessment of landslide hazard and risk — has hitherto not included the local, transient effects of previous landslides on susceptibility. In this contribution, we implement such transient effects, which we term "landslide path dependency', for the first time. Two landslide path depend...
Article
Full-text available
Semi‐arid ecosystems are often spatially self‐organized in typical patterns of vegetation bands with high plant cover interspersed with bare soil areas, also known as ‘tiger bush’. In modelling studies, most often, straight planar slopes were used to analyse vegetation patterning. The effect of slope steepness has been investigated widely, and some...
Article
Erosion processes, aggravated by human activity, have a large impact on the spatial variation of soil and topographic properties. Knowledge of the topography prior to human-induced erosion (paleotopography) in naturally stable landscapes is valuable for identifying vulnerable landscape positions and is required as starting point for erosion modelli...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Landslide susceptibility map (LSM) is a key element in hazard mitigation, risk management and regional planning. In mountainous area, hazard prediction, disaster prevention, mitigation strategies, crisis and risk management , and proper land use planning need reliable and accurate landslide susceptibility mapping. We got inspired when we looked at...
Article
Landscape evolution models (LEMs) are an increasingly popular resource for geomorphologists as they can operate as virtual laboratories where the implications of hypotheses about processes over human to geological timescales can be visualized at spatial scales from catchments to mountain ranges. Hypothetical studies for idealised landscapes have do...
Article
Landslides cause major environmental damage, economic losses and casualties. Although susceptibility to landsliding is usually considered an exclusively location-specific phenomenon, indications exist that landslide history co-determines susceptibility to future landslides. In this contribution, we quantified the role of landslide path dependency (...
Article
Full-text available
Soil erosion from agricultural areas is a large problem, because of off-site effects like the rapid filling of reservoirs. To mitigate the problem of sediments from agricultural areas reaching the channel, reservoirs and other surface waters, it is important to understand hillslope-channel connectivity and catchment connectivity. To determine the f...
Article
The food security-climate change nexus rapidly gains momentum. Soil degradation plays an important role in this context while dealing with e.g., the productive capacity of our soil resources or carbon sequestration for climate change mitigation. However little has been done to assess the pristine soil conditions despite the fact that these provide...
Article
Full-text available
p>Soil erosion from agricultural areas is a large problem, because of off-site effects like the rapid filling of reservoirs. To mitigate the problem of sediments from agricultural areas reaching the channel, reservoirs and other surface waters, it is important to understand hillslope-channel connectivity and catchment connectivity. To determine the...
Article
Climate change over the last century, expressed as temperature increase, is substantially stronger in the European Alps than the average for the northern Hemisphere. This leads to fast glacial retreat and permafrost degradation, and hence to increased rates and risks of mass wasting, more extreme floods in spring and lower base flow in summer. We d...
Article
The research community increasingly analyses global environmental problems like climate change and desertification with models. These global environmental modelling studies require global, high resolution, spatially exhaustive, and quantitative data describing the soil profile. This study aimed to develop a pedological approach that takes stock of...
Article
The development and application of numerical models to investigate fluvial sedimentary archives has increased during the last decades resulting in a sustained growth in the number of scientific publications with keywords, ‘fluvial models’, ‘fluvial process models’ and ‘fluvial numerical models’. In this context we compile and review the current con...
Article
Hydrological connectivity describes the physical coupling (linkages) of different elements within a landscape regarding (sub-) surface flows. A firm understanding of hydrological connectivity is important for catchment management applications, for e.g. habitat and species protection, and for flood resistance and resilience improvement. Thinking abo...
Article
Full-text available
Landslides are a major category of natural disasters, causing loss of lives, livelihoods and property. The critical roles played by triggering (such as extreme rainfall and earthquakes), and intrinsic factors (such as slope steepness, soil properties and lithology) have previously successfully been recognized and quantified using a variety of quali...
Article
Full-text available
Soils in Arctic regions currently enjoy attention because of their sensitivity to climate change. It is therefore important to understand the natural processes and rates of development of these soils. Specifically, there is a need to quantify the rates and interactions between various landscape- and soil-forming processes. Soil chronosequences are...
Article
Full-text available
Combining field reconstruction and landscape evolution modelling can be useful to investigate the relative role of different drivers on catchment response. The Geren Catchment (~45 km²) in western Turkey is suitable for such a study, as it has been influenced by uplift, climate change and lava damming. Four Middle Pleistocene lava flows (⁴⁰Ar/³⁹Ar-...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Landslide susceptibility maps are typically obtained by quantifying relations between landslides and conditioning attributes. Here, we take a fundamentally different starting point: path dependency and self-organization, i.e. the effect of landslides on landslides. We test two hypotheses: first, that landslides do preferentially follow landslides,...
Article
Knowledge about connectivity and what affects it, through space and time is needed for taking appropriate action at the right place and/or time by stakeholders. Various conceptual frameworks for hydrological and sediment connectivity have been developed in recent years. For most of these frameworks, the objective was to conceptualise connectivity,...
Conference Paper
Soils that have not yet fully adapted to their climatic, geomorphic and lithological condition, can be used as markers of time. I will first briefly review various properties of such non-equilibrium soils that can be used for this purpose, and indicate the typical timescales over which they can be used. I will then use two case studies, one from th...
Chapter
Slope instability results from the interplay between tectonic uplift, climatecontrolled weathering, and slope form (relief). Sediments accumulate as colluvium on footslopes when under the influence of gravity, fluvial processes and mass movements, and may be affected by pedogenesis, ecosystem change and human activity. This chapter shows that collu...
Article
Full-text available
High-mountain geomorphic processes enjoy increasing scientific and societal interest. This is because these processes are perceived to be changing more than elsewhere and because their effects on infrastructure and tourism are significant. Rock fall is among the processes that receive most attention due to its presumed intimate relation with permaf...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We review two recent and two unpublished papers from the landscape evolution modelling community that have the potential to add significantly to the standard modelling toolbox. Specifically, we have selected advances that may broaden the applicability of models for those that want to use them to help answer landscape reconstruction questions. The f...
Conference Paper
The research community increasingly uses models to analyze global environmental problems. On soil degradation, these studies require high resolution, spatially exhaustive, quantitative data on soil properties. This study aimed to develop a methodology that takes stock of available legacy data to create a suitable global soil database to support int...
Article
Channel bed sediment is composed of a combination of upstream and local hillslope sources. Factors that influence downstream changes in size, sorting, and lithological characteristics of bed material are complex. In order to better understand this complexity, we measured grain sizes and channel geometry on five streams draining the Colorado Front R...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Novel single-grain luminescence measurements of quartz and feldspar grains offer exciting ways forward to characterize rates and mechanisms of soil bioturbation. However, to fulfil this potential, the attribution problem must be solved – we must know which bioturbation mechanisms can lead to the observed outcome. Inverse modelling is a well-known s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Soil formation depends on bedrock, climate, relief, vegetation and time. Bioturbation and colluvial soil re-location are important and significant processes that affect the mechanisms and rate of bedrock weathering. The estimation of the relative fraction of bedrock grains which has been mixed in the soil and transported either vertically or latera...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The coasts of Spitsbergen are covered with raised marine beaches, developed under the isostatic rebound after the Last Glacial Maximum. This chronosequence of beaches provides a unique chance to study the speed of soil forming processes in cold and dry Arctic regions. Fieldwork was performed on gravelly marine beaches in the Ebba valley, central Sp...
Article
Complexity has long been recognized and is increasingly becoming mainstream in geomorphology. However, the relative novelty of various concepts and techniques associated to it means that ambiguity continues to surround complexity. In this commentary, we present and discuss a variety of recent contributions that have the potential to help clarify is...
Article
Full-text available
Land use classification is often the first step in land use studies and thus forms the basis for many earth science studies. In this paper, we focus on low-cost techniques for combining Landsat images with geographic information system approaches to create a land use map. In the Golestan region of Iran, we show that traditional supervised and unsup...
Article
Landscapes respond in complex ways to external drivers such as base level change due to damming events. In this study, landscape evolution modelling was used to understand and analyse long-term catchment response to lava damming events. PalaeoDEM reconstruction of a small Turkish catchment (45 km2) which endured multiple lava damming events in the...
Article
Sediment flux dynamics in fluvial systems have often been related to changes in external drivers of topography, climate or land cover. It is well known that these dynamics are nonlinear. Recently, model simulations of fluvial activity and landscape evolution have suggested that self-organization in landscapes can also cause internal complexity in t...
Article
Purpose Three previously published datasets of high-mountain soil variation in proglacial valleys in the Swiss Alps (80 soils) and a new dataset of high-mountain soil variation in a formerly glaciated valley in the Colorado Rocky Mountains (9 soils) are used to test the validity of the chronosequence approach and to study divergence and convergence...
Article
Natural damming of upland river systems, such as landslide or lava damming, occurs worldwide. Many dams fail shortly after their creation, while other dams are long-lived and therefore have a long-term impact on fluvial and landscape evolution. This long-term impact is still poorly understood and Landscape Evolution Modelling (LEM) can increase our...
Article
Soils in proglacial areas are often approached from a chronosequence viewpoint. In the chronosequence approach, the objective is to derive rates of soil formation from differences in properties between soils of different age. For this reason, in chronosequence studies, soils are sampled in locations that are assumed geomorphically stable and that h...
Poster
Full-text available
Overview of possibilties of landscape evolution model LAPSUS
Poster
Modelling experiment to investigate effects of time step change using LEM LAPSUS
Article
In Europe agricultural areas are of great importance to biodiversity conservation. One of the aims of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) after 2013 is to avoid additional loss of agriculture-related biodiversity. Farmland biodiversity is a public good that provides ecosystem services necessary for the sustainability of agriculture itself as well...
Article
Full-text available
Connectivity relates to the coupling of landforms (e.g. hillslopes and channels) and the transfer of water and sediment between them. The degree to which parts of a catchment are connected depends largely on the morphological complexity of the catchment's landscape. Landscapes can have very different and distinct morphologies, such as terraces, V-s...