Aina Puce

Aina Puce
Indiana University Bloomington | IUB · Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

PhD (from the University of Melbourne, Australia)

About

162
Publications
38,123
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19,516
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
4321 Citations
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Introduction
My laboratory focuses on studying the brain basis of non-verbal communication. We use different methods to be able to optimally answer our scientific questions. Our methods include Event-related potential, EEG time-frequency analysis, fMRI, eye tracking, TMS, structural & functional connectivity.

Publications

Publications (162)
Preprint
Full-text available
Neuroimaging data analysis often requires purpose-built software, which can be difficult to install and may produce different results across computing environments. Beyond being a roadblock to neuroscientists, these issues of accessibility and portability can hamper the reproducibility of neuroimaging data analysis pipelines. Here, we introduce the...
Article
Since the second-half of the twentieth century, intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG), including both electrocorticography (ECoG) and stereo-electroencephalography (sEEG), has provided an intimate view into the human brain. At the interface between fundamental research and the clinic, iEEG provides both high temporal resolution and high spatia...
Article
Full-text available
Good Scientific Practice (GSP) refers to both explicit and implicit rules, recommendations, and guidelines that help scientists to produce work that is of the highest quality at any given time, and to efficiently share that work with the community for further scrutiny or utilization. For experimental research using magneto- and electroencephalograp...
Article
Full-text available
Occipitotemporal regions within the face network process perceptual and socioemotional information, but the dynamics and information flow between different nodes of this network are still debated. Here, we analyzed intracerebral EEG from 11 epileptic patients viewing a stimulus sequence beginning with a neutral face with direct gaze. The gaze could...
Article
Full-text available
Statistical power is key for robust, replicable science. Here, we systematically explored how numbers of trials and subjects affect statistical power in MEG sensor-level data. More specifically, we simulated "experiments" using the MEG resting-state dataset of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). We divided the data in two conditions, injected a dip...
Article
Full-text available
Whether the brain operates at a critical “tipping” point is a long standing scientific question, with evidence from both cellular and systems-scale studies suggesting that the brain does sit in, or near, a critical regime. Neuroimaging studies of humans in altered states of consciousness have prompted the suggestion that maintenance of critical dyn...
Article
The Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM) has been active in advocating for the instantiation of best practices in neuroimaging data acquisition, analysis, reporting and sharing of both data and analysis code to deal with issues in science related to reproducibility and replicability. Here we summarize recommendations for such practices in ma...
Preprint
Full-text available
Occipito-temporal regions within the face network process perceptual and socio-emotional information, but the dynamics and interactions between different nodes within this network remain unknown. Here, we analyzed intracerebral EEG from 11 epileptic patients viewing a stimulus sequence beginning with a neutral face with direct gaze. The gaze could...
Preprint
Full-text available
Whether the brain operates at a critical ‘‘tipping” point is a long standing scientific question, with evidence from both cellular and systems-scale studies suggesting that the brain does sit in, or near, a critical regime. Neuroimaging studies of humans in altered states of consciousness have prompted the suggestion that maintenance of critical dy...
Preprint
Full-text available
Statistical power is key for robust, replicable science. Here, we systematically explored how numbers of trials and subjects affect statistical power in MEG sensor-level data. More specifically, we simulated “experiments” using the MEG resting-state dataset of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). We divided the data in two conditions, injected a dip...
Preprint
Neuroimaging methods, including magnetoencephalography and electroencephalo- graphy (MEEG), allow non-invasive collection of neural data in healthy people and in individuals with neurological or psychiatric disorders, with the aim of advancing the understanding of brain function in health and disease. Currently, scientific practice is undergoing a...
Article
Full-text available
Magnetoencephalography (MEG) records weak magnetic fields outside the human head and thereby provides millisecond-accurate information about neuronal currents supporting human brain function. MEG and electroencephalography (EEG) are closely related complementary methods and should be interpreted together whenever possible. This manuscript covers th...
Article
Full-text available
Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are non-invasive electrophysiological methods, which record electric potentials and magnetic fields due to electric currents in synchronously-active neurons. With MEG being more sensitive to neural activity from tangential currents and EEG being able to detect both radial and tangential...
Article
Theory and research indicate considerable influence of socio-emotionally significant experiences on children's functioning and adaptation. In the current study, we examined neurophysiological correlates of children's allocation of information processing resources to socio-emotionally significant events, specifically, simulated marital interactions....
Article
Background: The brain may reorganize to optimize stroke recovery. Yet relatively little is known about neural correlates of training-facilitated recovery, particularly after loss of body sensations. Objective: Our aim was to characterize changes in brain activation following clinically effective touch discrimination training in stroke patients w...
Data
Full-text available
Considerable ambiguity exists about the generators of the scalp recorded P300, despite a vast body of research employing a diverse range of methodologies. Previous investigations employing source localization techniques have been limited largely to equivalent current dipole models, with most studies identifying medial temporal and/or hippocampal so...
Article
Full-text available
Human and non-human primates rely on information gathered from faces during social interaction. Two channels of information are gathered from the face—the identity of the individual (conveyed by featural and configural aspects of the face), as well as their mental state and potential intentions (conveyed by the dynamic face). With respect to identi...
Article
Full-text available
Biological motion stimuli represent the essence of locomotor behavior and activate two major brain systems. One system is active in mentalizing, where an individual ascribes goals and mental states to another's actions, and consists mainly of the superior temporal sulcus, medial prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. A second system, consisting of the an...
Chapter
Full-text available
It has been 50 years since the term social attention was coined to refer to a special form of social awareness signaled by physical proximity, head and body orientation to conspecifics, and dynamic gaze. Since then the research in social attention has undergone substantial changes in direction, largely driven by developments in technology and scien...
Chapter
Full-text available
The chapters in this volume comprise a small sample of a broad multidisciplinary effort to understand how humans navigate their labyrinthine social world. Social attention is fundamental to this endeavor because it determines what information is processed by the individual. In this final chapter we begin by summarizing some of the major findings fr...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter we focus on the neural processes that occur in the mature healthy human brain in response to evaluating another’s social attention. We first examine the brain’s sensitivity to gaze direction of others, social attention (as typically indicated by gaze contact), and joint attention. Brain regions such as the superior temporal sulcus (...
Article
A disturbance in the integration of information during mental processing has been implicated in schizophrenia, possibly due to faulty communication within and between brain regions. Graph theoretic measures allow quantification of functional brain networks. Functional networks are derived from correlations between time courses of brain regions. Gro...
Article
Full-text available
This study builds on the literature on child exposure to marital conflict by testing whether mother-reported marital conflict exposure predicts a child's P3 event-related potential (ERP) components generated in response to viewing quasi-marital conflict photos. We collected ERP data from 23 children (9-11 years of age) while presenting photos of ac...
Article
Full-text available
Gaze direction, a cue of both social and spatial attention, is known to modulate early neural responses to faces e.g. N170. However, findings in the literature have been inconsistent, likely reflecting differences in stimulus characteristics and task requirements. Here, we investigated the effect of task on neural responses to dynamic gaze changes:...
Article
Full-text available
The extent of visual cortex reorganization following injury remains controversial. We report serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a patient with sequential posterior circulation strokes occurring three weeks apart, compared with data from an age-matched healthy control subject. At 8 days following a left occipital stroke, c...
Article
Full-text available
Our brains readily decode facial movements and changes in social attention, reflected in earlier and larger N170 event-related potentials (ERPs) to viewing gaze aversions vs. direct gaze in real faces (Puce et al., 2000). In contrast, gaze aversions in line-drawn faces do not produce these N170 differences (Rossi et al., 2014), suggesting that phys...
Chapter
Face recognition can be defined as the ability to identify an individual from gazing only at their face, or an image of their face. This ability remains largely unaffected even with extreme changes in lighting level, viewing angle, and distance as experienced in daily life. In cases of brain injury, individuals may develop an inability to recognize...
Article
Full-text available
White matter abnormalities in schizophrenia have been revealed by many imaging techniques and analysis methods. One of the findings by diffusion tensor imaging is a decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA), which is an indicator of white matter integrity. On the other hand, elevation of metabolic rate in white matter was observed from positron emissi...
Book
Full-text available
In this chapter we focus on the neural processes that occur in the mature healthy human brain in response to evaluating another’s social attention. We first examine the brain’s sensitivity to gaze direction of others, social attention (as typically indicated by gaze contact), and joint attention. Brain regions such as the superior temporal sulcus (...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies of schizophrenia have revealed cognitive and memory deficits that are accompanied by disruptions of neuronal connectivity in cortical and subcortical brain regions. More recently, alterations of topological organization of structural networks in schizophrenia are also being identified using graph theoretical analysis. However, the ro...
Article
Full-text available
How do our brains respond when we are being watched by a group of people?Despite the large volume of literature devoted to face processing, this question has received very little attention. Here we measured the effects on the face-sensitive N170 and other ERPs to viewing displays of one, two and three faces in two experiments. In Experiment 1, over...
Chapter
On meeting another individual for the first time during the course of a conversation we learn a lot unique and idiosyncratic facts about that person. If that meeting is socially or professionally significant, in the future, on crossing paths with that individual again, we can easily remember their details and the circumstances of the meeting. The p...
Article
Full-text available
To understand social interactions we must decode dynamic social cues from seen faces. Here we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the neural responses underlying the perception of emotional expressions and gaze direction changes as depicted in an interaction between two agents. Subjects viewed displays of paired faces that first established...
Article
This resource explores the potential to shape and maximize neural plastic changes in the brain after stroke from a multimodal perspective. Active skill-based learning is identified as a central element of a restorative approach to rehabilitation. The evidence behind core learning principles as well as specific learning strategies that have been app...
Article
In recent years, it has become evident that neural responses previously considered to be unisensory can be modulated by sensory input from other modalities. In this regard, visual neural activity elicited to viewing a face is strongly influenced by concurrent incoming auditory information, particularly speech. Here, we applied an additive-factors p...
Article
Full-text available
Endocannabinoid receptors modulate synaptic plasticity in the brain and may therefore impact cortical connectivity not only during development but also in response to substance abuse in later life. Such alterations may not be evident in volumetric measures utilized in brain imaging, but could affect the local and global organization of brain networ...
Article
Full-text available
Facial movements have the potential to be powerful social signals. Previous studies have shown that eye gaze changes and simple mouth movements can elicit robust neural responses, which can be altered as a function of potential social significance. Eye blinks are frequent events and are usually not deliberately communicative, yet blink rate is know...
Article
In contrast to visual object processing, relatively little is known about how the human brain processes everyday real-world sounds, transforming highly complex acoustic signals into representations of meaningful events or auditory objects. We recently reported a fourfold cortical dissociation for representing action (nonvocalization) sounds correct...
Chapter
Neuropsychology relates specific impairments in an individual’s behaviour to putative sites of injury or disease in their brain. Traditionally, this structure-function coupling has been one of ‘guilt by association’: correlating the lesion site (as determined either at autopsy or in structural neuroimaging studies) with overt behaviour (as studied...
Article
The neural basis underlying somatosensory impairment and recovery poststroke is virtually unexplored. To investigate the relationship between touch discrimination impairment and task-related brain activation in stroke survivors with somatosensory impairment following subcortical or cortical lesions. A total of 19 stroke survivors with touch impairm...
Chapter
Somatosensory function is the ability to interpret bodily sensation. Sensation takes a number of forms, including touch, pressure, vibration, temperature, itch, tickle, and pain. The somatosensory system allows us to interpret sensory messages received from our body and consists of sensory receptors located in the skin, tissues, and joints; the ner...
Article
With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more...
Article
Full-text available
In an everyday social interaction we automatically integrate another’s facial movements and vocalizations, be they linguistic or otherwise. This requires audiovisual integration of a continual barrage of sensory input—a phenomenon previously well-studied with human audiovisual speech, but not with non-verbal vocalizations. Using both fMRI and ERPs,...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the effect of musical expertise on sensitivity to asynchrony for drumming point-light displays, which varied in their physical characteristics (Experiment 1) or in their degree of audiovisual congruency (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, 21 repetitions of three tempos x three accents x nine audiovisual delays were presented to four ja...
Article
In healthy elderly participants, there has been little correlation found between measures of global brain atrophy and functional magnetic resonance imaging activated voxel counts and mean percent magnetic resonance signal change. We used a validated passive viewing task to calculate the fMRI activated voxel counts and mean percent MR signal change...
Article
Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of intractable epilepsy. The metabolic defect has proven utility in the lateralization of temporal lobe epilepsy. However, the role of FDG-PET imaging in the localization of a seizure focus within the temporal lobe is uncertain. We evaluat...
Article
Visual cortical reorganization following injury remains poorly understood. The authors performed serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on patients with visual cortex infarction to evaluate early and late striate, ventral, and dorsal extrastriate cortical activation. Patients were studied with fMRI within 10 days and at 6 months. The a...
Conference Paper
This workshop will provide an overview of current research into how humans use faces, body postures and motion to recognize human activity and its social content. Additionally, we will focus on cutting edge research in brain imaging that reveals the brain processes underlying the recognition of face and gesture. These talks will highlight issues fu...
Article
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterised by disturbances in concentration and memory, symptoms which are a source of further distress for patients. Related to this, abnormalities in underlying working memory (WM) systems have been identified [Clark, C.R., McFarlane, A.C., Morris, P., Weber, D.L., Sonkkilla, C., Shaw, M.E., Marcina, J....
Article
Full-text available
The detection of threat is a role that the amygdala plays well, evidenced by its increased response to fearful faces in human neuroimaging studies. A critical element of the fearful face is an increase in eye white area (EWA), hypothesized to be a significant cue in activating the amygdala. However, another important social signal that can increase...
Article
The pli de passage moyen (PPM) is an omega-shaped cortical landmark bulging into the central sulcus. There has been considerable interest in the PPM given that hand motor and sensory tasks have been found on functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging to activate the structure. Note, however, that the cortical function subserved by the PPM is not c...
Article
It is widely recognized that viewing a speaker's face enhances vocal communication, although the neural substrates of this phenomenon remain unknown. We propose that the enhancement effect uses the ongoing oscillatory activity of local neuronal ensembles in the primary auditory cortex. Neuronal oscillations reflect rhythmic shifting of neuronal ens...
Article
Cognitive reserve (CR) is a theoretical concept used to explain and study individual differences in cognitive symptom expression in neurological disease. In the absence of neurologic injury or demands on processing, compensatory and protective factors may be considered to represent cognitive capacity (CC), rather than cognitive reserve, per se. We...
Article
The superior temporal sulcus (STS) and surrounding lateral temporal and inferior parietal cortices are an important part of a network involved in the processing of biological movement. It is unclear whether the STS responds to the movement of different body parts uniformly, or if the response depends on the body part that is moving. Here we examine...
Article
Diaschisis may play a critical role in motor recovery, but in other cortical networks its role is unclear. Some visual system regions, such as the fusiform gyri, depend on intact striate regulation for their function. We evaluated visual cortical diaschisis by serial functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using a high-level visual activation task,...
Article
Gaze direction signals another's focus of social attention. Here, we recorded event-related potentials to a multiface display where a gaze aversion created three different social scenarios involving social attention, mutual gaze exchange, and gaze avoidance. N170 was unaffected by social scenario. P350 latency was the shortest in social attention a...
Article
During social interactions our brains continuously integrate incoming auditory and visual input from the movements and vocalizations of others. Yet, the dynamics of the neural events elicited to these multisensory stimuli remain largely uncharacterized. Here we recorded audiovisual scalp event-related potentials (ERPs) to dynamic human faces with a...
Article
04-01 Abnormal recruitment of brain networks during trauma-neutral verbal working memory processing in PTSD - Volume 18 Issue 6 - KA Moores, CR Clark, AC McFarlane, GC Brown, A Puce, DJ Taylor
Article
The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate human MT/V5 activity when observing changes in eye gaze. Subjects viewed a face in which the eyes changed to look either directly at (BACK) or away from (AWAY) the subject in a series of apparent motion conditions. BACK involved 2 directions, from left to center (LC) and from right...