Aimee Maxwell

Aimee Maxwell
Deakin University · School of Education

MPsych (Ed & Dev)/PhD

About

26
Publications
8,256
Reads
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810
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
761 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - November 2016
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Teaching half of the Psychological Assessment unit EDF5514 (part of the Master of Professional Psychology) - Adult Psychopathology - Personality - Positive Psychology - Neuropsychological assessment - Delivering Assessment Feedback
January 2016 - December 2016
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Fellow
January 2011 - February 2017
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Aimee passed her doctorate with no corrections. She investigated the outcomes and correlates of emotional labour in Australian school principals, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Background Patients with a permanent impairment may be unable to reach full health. Consequently health services which cure illnesses which are unrelated to the impairment may increase health less than services for patients with no impairment. While it has been argued that this should not lead to discrimination against impaired patients there is li...
Data
Adjustment of the first mobility sample. (DOCX)
Data
Deleted cases by criteria. (DOCX)
Data
Comparison of edited and deleted values for Service A, severity level 4. (DOCX)
Data
Frequency distribution of RS-WTP values (V) for severity level 4, task 1. (DOCX)
Data
Mapping health states causes by impairments into 3 MAUI instruments. (DOCX)
Article
Background Cost-utility analysis prioritizes services using cost, life-years, and the health state utility of the life-years. Nevertheless, a significant body of evidence suggests that the public would prefer more variables to be considered in decision making and at least some sharing of the budget with services for severe conditions that are not c...
Article
Objectives To test the hypothesis that the “severity effect”—the preference for more than utility-maximizing expenditure on severe health states—may be the result of, or exacerbated by, the uncertainty associated with the chance of contracting the illness that causes the severe health state. Methods Survey respondents were asked to imagine that th...
Article
Full-text available
It has been proposed that equity may be included in the economic evaluation of health services using the ‘proportional shortfall’ (PS)—the proportion of a person’s QALY expectation that they would lose because of an illness. The present paper reports the results of a population survey designed to test whether PS helped to explain people’s preferenc...
Article
Full-text available
IntroductionThis paper suggests and tests a reason why the public might support the funding of services for rare diseases (SRDs) when the services are effective but not cost effective, i.e. when more health could be produced by allocating funds to other services. It is postulated that the fairness of funding a service is influenced by a comparison...
Article
PurposeEconomic evaluation of health services commonly requires information regarding health-state utilities. Sometimes this information is not available but non-utility measures of quality of life may have been collected from which the required utilities can be estimated. This paper examines the possibility of mapping a non-utility-based outcome,...
Article
Full-text available
The ‘severity hypothesis’ is that a health service which increases a patient’s utility by a fixed amount will be valued more highly when the initial health state is more severe. Supporting studies have employed a limited range of analytical techniques and the objective of the present paper is to test the hypothesis using a new methodology, the Rela...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A longitudinal model of emotional labor and job-related psychosocial health: controlling for emotional demands is vital. We investigated emotional labor and occupational psychosocial health outcomes (including job satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life) among Australian school principals (N=1300) in a three-wave longitudinal study. Structural e...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: (i) to demonstrate a method which ameliorates the problem of self-selection in the estimation of population norms from web-based data and (ii) to use the method to calculate population norms for two multi-attribute utility (MAU) instruments, the AQoL-6D and AQoL-8D, and population norms for the sub-scales from which they are constructe...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of a patient's age on the social valuation of health services remains controversial, with empirical results varying in magnitude and implying a different age-value profile. This article employs a new methodology to re-examine these questions. Data were obtained from 2 independent Web-based surveys that administered the Relative Social Wi...
Article
Full-text available
Most research into emotional labour is focussed on front-line service staff and health professionals, in short-term interactions. Little exists exploring the emotional labour involved in repeated on-going interactions by educational leaders with key stakeholders. This study explored the relationships between emotional demands, three emotional labou...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Health services which affect the quality of life (QoL) are increasingly evaluated using cost utility analyses (CUA). These commonly employ one of a small number of multi attribute utility instruments (MAUI) to assess the effects of the health service upon utility. However the MAUI differ significantly and the choice of instrument may al...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Cost utility analysis permits the comparison of disparate health services by measuring outcomes in comparable units, namely, quality-adjusted life-years, which equal life-years times the utility of the health state. However, comparability is compromised when different utility instruments predict different utilities for the same health...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper was to report tests of the validity and reliability of a new instrument, the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL)-8D, which was constructed to improve the evaluation of health services that have an impact upon the psychosocial aspects of the quality of life. Australian and US data from a large multi-instrument comparison s...
Article
Empirical evidence indicates that people consider sharing health resources to be important even in the absence of the attributes usually associated with equity (age, social class, ethnicity, disease severity or geographic location). If government is to take account of these preferences then survey methods are needed which allow their measurement. T...

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Project (1)