Agustin Goenaga

Agustin Goenaga
Lund University | LU · Department of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
981
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Introduction
Agustín Goenaga currently works at the Department of Political Science, Lund University. Agustín does research in Comparative Politics, Political Economy and Democratic Theory. He is currently involved in two projects: "State-Making and the Origins of Global Order in the Long Nineteenth Century and Beyond (STANCE)", funded by Riksbanken Jubileumsfund, and "The Deliberative Capacity of Democratic Systems", funded by Kungl. Vitterhetsakademien.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Previous research shows that wars contributed to the expansion of state revenues in the Early Modern period and in the twentieth century. There are, however, few cross-national studies on the long nineteenth century. Using new unbalanced panel data on wars and public revenues from 1816 to 1913 for 27 American and European countries, this article pr...
Article
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Research on democratic attitudes has recently turned to examine citizens’ views about the performance of specific democratic institutions in their country. Drawing on data from the European Social Survey (ESS6) and the Bright Line Watch Project (BLW) in the United States, this article argues that such evaluative questions carry high levels of cogni...
Article
Full-text available
This article offers the first empirical and cross‐national analysis of citizens’ views about the democratic importance of the public sphere. We first identify three normative functions that public spheres are expected to perform in representative democracies: they provide voice to alternative perspectives; they empower citizens to criticize politic...
Article
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Using the 2012 European Social Survey (ESS), this article provides the first comparative analysis of how conceptions of democracy differ between men and women in 29 countries, and how this relates to their overall satisfaction with and support for democracy. Women tend to consider less important those aspects of democracy that privilege male resour...
Article
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Through a discourse analysis of French and Swedish legislative debates from 1968 to 2017, this article examines how actors challenge and reinforce dominant ideas about the link between nationality and political rights. We argue that the broader political culture influences which discursive strategies – or ‘frames’ – are more likely to structure par...
Article
This article presents new evidence on the efforts of states to collect and process information about themselves, their territories, and their populations. We compile data on five institutions and policies: the regular implementation of a reliable census, the regular release of statistical yearbooks, the introduction of civil and population register...
Article
How should liberal societies select prospective members? A conventional reading of immigration history posits that whereas ascriptive characteristics drove immigration policy in the past, contemporary policy is based on the principle of nondiscrimination. Yet a closer look at the characteristics of those admitted reveals systematic group biases tha...
Chapter
For decades, Latin America’s troubled experience with democracy has served as a testing ground for theories on democratization and political regimes. Today, most countries in the region have established democratic institutions, and a return to full-fledged authoritarianism is unlikely. However, these regimes are often at odds with the electoral, co...
Thesis
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States are expected to raise revenue through taxation, provide security, enforce rights, deliver public services, and build infrastructure. However, contemporary states vary in their ability to perform these tasks. In order to explain variation, I conceptualize state capacity as the ability of the state to coordinate large-scale collective action....
Article
This project has two objectives: 1) interrogating the idea that the upsurge in violence in Mexico is purely the result of a competition over material interests; and 2) arguing that the proliferation of social conflicts that blur the distinctions between political resistance and criminality (i.e., transnational gangs, drug-cartels) might be the resu...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Several measurement instruments (e.g., Polity, Freedom House, V-Dem) are available today that attempt to evaluate the quality of democracy according to the performance of political institutions in the aggregation of individual preferences and in the formulation of policies that are responsive to those preferences. We do not have, however, good empirical tools to evaluate how democracies form collective preferences, which is a major part of what democratic institutions are expected to achieve. This project, funded by the Swedish Royal Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities (Kungl. Vitterhetsakademien), seeks, among other things, to develop a measurement strategy to evaluate processes of collective preference formation in contemporary democracies. The data generated by such measurement strategy should allow us to empirically examine the characteristics of large-scale deliberative systems, offering insights about, for example: how the sites of collective preference formation vary across polities with different institutional designs; how the same institutional innovations are integrated (or not) into broader deliberative ecologies; and how changes in particular sites of collective preference formation have ripple effects that strengthen or undermine the overall performance of the deliberative system.
Project
At STANCE, Agustín is currently working on two main projects: (1) a monograph on the evolution of state capacity and economic development among late industrializers in Western Europe and Latin America; and (2) a series of articles on the factors that shape different dimensions of state capacity (e.g., taxation, information gathering, public goods provision, coordination of collective action, and territorial reach).