Agnes Sirima

Agnes Sirima
Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) | sua · Department of Tourism and Recreation

PhD

About

25
Publications
24,020
Reads
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258
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - April 2015
Clemson University
Position
  • Research Assistant
July 2008 - present
Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA)
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
August 2011 - May 2015
Clemson University
Field of study
  • Parks and Conservation Area Management
August 2008 - July 2010
Wageningen University & Research
Field of study
  • Leisure, Tourism and Environment
August 2003 - July 2006
Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA)
Field of study
  • Wildlife Management

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all economies and life support systems world-wide. Owing to the pandemic's unpredictable nature, experts and policymakers struggle to find a headway to slow infections and further economic deterioration. The purpose of this study is to assess East African Community (EAC) states’ early responses and the pandemic’s...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all economies and life support systems worldwide. Owing to the pandemic's unpredictable nature, experts and policymakers struggle to find a headway to slow infections and further economic deterioration. The purpose of this study is to assess East African Community (EAC) states' early responses and the pandemic's i...
Article
There is unclear understanding of tourism development beyond the borders of Sub Saharan African countries’ protected areas, thus, uncertain about its potentials and sustainability. This study contributes to the body of knowledge by applying the Tourism Area Life Cycle (TALC) model to evaluate tourism development-path for 36 years in three tourism g...
Article
Full-text available
Increasingly, tourism is negatively impacted by climate change and needs to advance adaptive strategies. This study assessed climate change adaptation measures and barriers to implementation in Dana Biosphere Reserve (DBR), the most important ecotourism destination in Jordan using semi-structured interviews with key informants. It was found that DB...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Bamboo is an important non-timber forest product and a major wood substitute. It can be processed and fabricated into different products as a substitute for wood products at an industrial scale. However, the available information on bamboo resources availability, its properties and potential for contribution towards Sustainable Development Goals is...
Article
The dramatic loss of open space in the USA over the last 50 years has led to increased conservation efforts by public, private, and non-profit entities. Amongst private landowners, conservation easements, or conditions written into a property’s title that permanently limit how it may be used, are a popular form of land protection. Private land prot...
Article
Full-text available
Promotion of local seafood and related culture has become an important strategy for enhancing economic sustainability of struggling commercial fishing businesses in coastal tourism destinations. Theme-based tourism trails can be catalysts for identifying, recognizing, and sustaining important aspects of culture, heritage, and industry in rural regi...
Article
Full-text available
There are polarized evidences of the impact of agricultural land fragmentation on land productivity. On the one hand there viewpoints which consider land fragmentation to harm agricultural productivity. On the other hand there are counter thoughts which view land fragmentation as a positive situation which allows farmers to cultivate many environme...
Article
Full-text available
There are polarized evidences of the impact of agricultural land fragmentation on land productivity. On the one hand there viewpoints which consider land fragmentation to harm agricultural productivity. On the other hand there are counter thoughts which view land fragmentation as a positive situation which allows farmers to cultivate many environme...
Article
Displacement of people to allow expansion of protected areas involves removing people from their ancestral land or excluding people from undertaking livelihood activities in their usual areas. The approach perpetuates the human-nature dichotomy, where protected areas are regarded as pristine lands that need to be separated from human activities. Be...
Article
In the recent past, the concept of ecotourism has been promoted in Tanzania as an alternative, low-impact form of tourism that supports conservation of natural resources, preserves local culture, and provides economic benefits to the communities. Existing evidence shows that Tanzania has not utilised most of its ecotourism potential. The actual amo...
Article
Full-text available
Cultural tourism programmes (CTPs) provide opportunities for rural communities to supplement their income. While these programmes are intended to empower local people and reduce poverty, the mechanisms used for choosing the targeted ‘communities' remain largely unexamined. This paper analyses the planning, structure and implementation of CTPs as a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This project examined stakeholder interest and capacity for development of a SC seafood trail. The project focused on seafood related businesses on the SC coast (in three major regions of the coast – Myrtle Beach, Charleston and Beaufort/Hilton). The study included an inventory that identified 106 businesses with potential interest in a seafood tra...
Article
Land-use-change conflicts have shaped the conservation and tourism activities and human livelihood debate in the Usangu Plains over the last 10 years. This has led Ruaha National Park to become the largest national park in Tanzania and the second largest in Africa. The need to understand the rationale behind the expansion of Ruaha National Park and...
Article
Full-text available
One of the core elements of tourism development is to encourage local communities' participation as it is central to the sustainability of tourism industry. While the literature suggests a number of roles local communities could take in tourism development, little emphasis has so far been given as to how local communities themselves feel about this...
Article
Full-text available
Local communities’ participation in tourism benefit-sharing is central to tourism development. While there is a well-established literature on benefit-sharing from the perspective of wildlife protected areas and adjacent local communities, there is little emphasis on how other tourism businesses do this. Using a case study of Barabarani village, Ta...
Article
Full-text available
Water scarcity is globally getting worse in the light of increase in demand for water use. Human and ecosystem health and economic development are affected by problems of water scarcity and water pollution. This paper assessed the net benefit of water resource in crop production around the Kilombero Valley Ramsar Site in Tanzania. Specifically, the...
Data
Full-text available
Water scarcity is globally getting worse in the light of increase in demand for water use. Human and ecosystem health and economic development are affected by problems of water scarcity and water pollution. This paper assessed the net benefit of water resource in crop production around the Kilombero Valley Ramsar Site in Tanzania. Specifically, the...
Article
Full-text available
The Marine Farming Association of New Zealand developed and published a tourist trail brochure in 2005 with the purpose of upholding the positive image of aquaculture among residents and tourists on the Top of the South Island. Another objective was to strengthen the collaboration between tourism and fisheries stakeholders in promoting the region a...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project was designed to meet SC Sea Grant 2012-2014 priorities under Strategic Area II, Goal 1, Objective 1.1: “Research and outreach to assist the state’s natural resource-dependent businesses in developing and implementing innovative product lines, technologies, and services that foster a healthy local economy and sustainable resource base” and Strategic Area III, Goal 2, Objective 2.2: “Develop new products and innovative marketing approaches to increase seafood availability and profitability.” The ultimate goal was to explore potential for the development of a South Carolina Seafood Trail, targeting tourists and others on the coast, as a means to highlight and promote the availability of local seafood products and to tell the story of seafood harvest on the coast. The goal was not to facilitate the creation of a seafood trail, but to determine if there was interest among stakeholders and collaborative capacity for development. The project had three objectives: • Objective 1: Identify all potential business participants and tourism planning partners relevant to a seafood related tourism trail on the South Carolina coast. • Objective 2: Gather input from potential trail stakeholders (businesses, tourism planners) on strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to formation of a seafood trail. • Objective 3: Facilitate information sharing and collaborative thinking among potential business partners and tourism management organizations regarding development of an SC Seafood Trail.
Project
Biodiversity is an inherently international agenda mainstreamed as a serious global concern given attention locally, nationally, and internationally. This concern is based on the critical role biodiversity plays in providing essentials for our survival and wellbeing and so the fact that much of human well-being depends on biodiversity (Collins, 2013; Homewood et al., 2012). Throughout the world biodiversity conservation has become an important agenda, with recognition and support of the governments, international organizations, experts, and other key players across a range of sectors (Hoban & Vernesi, 2012). Biodiversity conservation remains one of the important human endeavors on the planet, given the need to maintain biodiversity and provision of ecosystem goods and services, which make up the foundation for human well-being (Chape et al., 2008). Biodiversity conservation continues to be an important stream in local, national, and international discussions as the international community strives to accelerate its efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (http://www.cbd.int/idb/). There are, however, several challenges facing biodiversity conservation. These include the mounting problems of: conflicts with various social actors - often reflected in tension with conservation management officials; human population increase - reflected in the increasing harvest of natural resources; development expansion – reflected in the expansion of extractive industries which create growing demand on natural resources; climate change - reflected in biodiversity loss and changes in ecosystem services; emerging wildlife diseases such as bird flu; and other human and environmental factors often reflected in pollution and land degradation (Hoban & Vernesi, 2012; http://www.wcs.org/conservation-challenges.aspx; Neumann, 2002; Warner, 2000). Other challenges facing biodiversity conservation include the daunting task of working in areas of low income, education, and/or political and community stability, and where exploitation of resources and land is desired by local and international players. Furthermore, conservation actions or interventions (such as the establishment of PAs, biodiversity restoration or rehabilitation) are affected by, address and sometimes contribute to conflicts through clashing with local interests (Hoban & Vernesi, 2012). This has created resentment and mistrust by various actors including local communities (Hoban & Vernesi, 2012; Hammill & Brown, 2006). These challenges together complicate the conservation of biodiversity since they put greater pressure on biodiversity that shrinks the resource base and create conservation conflicts with various social actors thereby hindering the attainment of both biodiversity conservation and human development (Warner, 2000; http://www.wcs.org/conservation-challenges.aspx). One approach of addressing such challenges is through stakeholders’ involvement and participation in biodiversity conservation (Niezgoda & Czernek, 2008; Lewis, 1996; Walpole & Goodwin, 2001). The inclusion of local communities is crucial for the sustainability of biodiversity conservation (Sanoff, 2000). However, to be able to conserve biodiversity one needs to understand it. A lack of awareness means less public support in biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, poor participation in conservation, and eventually little readiness in addressing the different sides of the biodiversity question (Collins, 2013; Sanoff, 2000). This research is an attempt to find out what people know about biodiversity (what biodiversity mean to them, the importance of biodiversity, threats of biodiversity, the various ways of biodiversity conservation, how they would like to participate in biodiversity conservation etc.). Understanding local communities’ awareness of biodiversity is useful in guiding policy interventions and best practices toward achieving effective biodiversity conservation while resolving and avoiding conflicts with adjacent communities. More specifically, the research intends to assess local communities’ awareness of biodiversity within and around Wazo Hill Quarry in Tanzania. This mining company was chosen because of its commitment to biodiversity conservation demonstrated by its high value biodiversity resources within and around this area, rehabilitation efforts going-on in the area, and its efforts to promote biodiversity conservation through research. The research is guided by the following objectives. General objective To assess local communities’ awareness of biodiversity within and around Wazo Hill Quarry Specific objectives 1. To assess local communities’ knowledge of biodiversity within and around the Wazo Hill quarry 2. To assess local communities attitude toward the effects of mining activities on biodiversity at Wazo Hill quarry 3. To assess community attitude toward biodiversity restoration project at Wazo Hill quarry