Agnès Lacreuse

Agnès Lacreuse
University of Massachusetts Amherst | UMass Amherst · Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

PhD

About

71
Publications
7,397
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,625
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
571 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
My lab investigates neurocognitive aging in nonhuman primates, with current studies conducted in the marmoset. Main lines of research focus on (1) sex differences in cognitive and brain aging; (2) understanding the interactions between estrogen, sleep, temperature and cognition and (3) assessing the effects of a brain-selective estrogen on the brain and behavior.

Publications

Publications (71)
Article
While humans exhibit a significant degree of neuropathological changes associated with deficits in cognitive and memory functions during aging, non-human primates (NHP) present with more variable expressions of pathological alterations among individuals and species. As such, NHP with long life expectancy in captivity offer an opportunity to study b...
Article
Aging across the Primate Order is poorly understood because ages of individuals are often unknown, there is a dearth of aged animals available for study, and because aging is best characterized by longitudinal studies which are difficult in long-lived species. The human population is aging rapidly, and advanced age is a primary risk factor for seve...
Article
Longitudinal studies are essential to understand healthy and pathological neurocognitive aging such as Alzheimer's Disease, but longitudinal designs are rare in both humans and non-human primate models of aging because of the difficulty of tracking cognitive change in long-lived primates. Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are uniquely suited fo...
Article
The investigation of neurobiological and neuropathological changes that affect synaptic integrity and function with aging is key to understanding why the aging brain is vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease. We investigated the cellular characteristics in the cerebral cortex of behaviorally characterized marmosets, based on their trajectories of cognit...
Article
Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are a class of drugs commonly given to patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent breast cancers to reduce estrogenic stimulation. However, AIs like Letrozole are associated with negative side effects such as cognitive deficits, sleep disturbances and hot flashes. We have previously shown that these negative effects c...
Article
Olfactory dysfunction has been identified as an early biomarker for dementia risk but has rarely been assessed in nonhuman primate models of human aging. To better characterize common marmosets as such models, we assessed olfactory discrimination performance in a sample of 10 animals (5 females), aged 2.5-8.9 years old. The monkeys were proficient...
Article
Age-related cognitive decline has been extensively studied in humans, but the majority of research designs are cross-sectional and compare across younger and older adults. Longitudinal studies are necessary to capture variability in cognitive aging trajectories but are difficult to carry out in humans and long-lived nonhuman primates. Marmosets are...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are an essential research model for gaining a comprehensive understanding of the neural mechanisms of neurocognitive aging in our own species. In the present study, we used resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) to investigate the relationship between prefrontal cortical and striatal neural interactions, and...
Article
Full-text available
Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are an essential research model for gaining a comprehensive understanding of the neural mechanisms of neurocognitive aging in our own species. In the present study, we used resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) to investigate the relationship between prefrontal cortical and striatal neural interactions, and cognitive...
Article
Executive function (EF) is a complex construct that reflects multiple higher-order cognitive processes such as planning, updating, inhibiting and set-shifting. Decline in these functions is a hallmark of cognitive ageing in humans, and age differences and changes in EF correlate with age-related differences and changes in association cortices, part...
Article
Population hand preferences are rare in nonhuman primates, but individual hand preferences are consistent over a lifetime and considered to reflect an individual's preference to use a particular hemisphere when engaged in a specific task. Previous findings in marmosets have indicated that left-handed individuals tend to be more fearful than their r...
Article
Full-text available
Sex differences in human cognitive performance are well characterized. However, the neural correlates of these differences remain elusive. This issue may be clarified using nonhuman primates, for which sociocultural influences are minimized. We used the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) to investigate sex differences in two aspects of executive functio...
Article
Breast cancer patients using aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as an adjuvant therapy often report side effects including hot flashes, mood changes, and cognitive impairment. Despite long-term use in humans, little is known about the effects of continuous AI administration on the brain and cognition. We used a primate model of human cognitive aging, the c...
Article
The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is uniquely suited for longitudinal studies of cognitive aging, due to a relatively short lifespan, sophisticated cognitive abilities, and patterns of brain aging that resemble those of humans. We examined cognitive function and fine motor skills in male and female marmosets (mean age ∼5 at study entry) foll...
Article
Full-text available
This study used Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) to identify potential neurometabolitic markers of cognitive performance in male (n =7) and female (n=8) middle-aged (~5 years old) common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Anesthetized marmosets were scanned with a 4.7 T/40cm horizontal magnet equipped with 450 mT/m magnetic field gradients and a...
Article
Loss of ovarian function in women is associated with sleep disturbances and cognitive decline, which suggest a key role for estrogens and/or progestins in modulating these symptoms. The effects of ovarian hormones on sleep and cognitive processes have been studied in separate research fields that seldom intersect. However, sleep has a considerable...
Chapter
The present chapter describes studies in humans, non-human primates and rodents that have examined the effects of ovarian hormones on executive function. The great majority of studies have addressed the effects of estrogens in females, with a paucity of work devoted to progestins. Estrogens appear to improve both the maintenance and updating of wor...
Article
Full-text available
Menopausal women often suffer from hot flashes and sleep disturbances that significantly impact their quality of life. Both human and animal studies suggest that loss of estrogens during menopause contribute to these symptoms. In the female rat, both core body temperature (CBT) and sleep are sensitive to 17β-estradiol (E2) levels, but important...
Article
Inhibitory control is an important component of executive function. An emerging literature in humans suggests that inhibitory control is sexually dimorphic and modulated by sex steroids, but evidence for such a link in nonhuman animals is scarce. In this study, we examined the effects of menstrual cycle and biological sex on response inhibition, as...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined sex differences in executive function in middle-aged gonadectomized marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with or without hormonal replacement. We tested ten castrated male (mean age 5.5 years) marmosets treated with testosterone cypionate (T, n = 5) or vehicle (n = 5) on Reversal Learning, which contributes to cognitive flexibility, a...
Article
This review discusses the unique contribution of nonhuman primate research to our understanding of the neurocognitive effects of estrogens throughout the adult lifespan in females. Mounting evidence indicates that estrogens affect many aspects of hippocampal, prefrontal and cholinergic function in the primate brain and the underlying mechanisms are...
Article
Full-text available
Intermanual transfer refers to an effect, whereby training one hand to perform a motor task improves performance in the opposite untrained hand. We tested the hypothesis that handedness facilitates intermanual transfer in two nonhuman primate species: rhesus monkeys (N = 13) and chimpanzees (N = 52). Subjects were grouped into one of four condition...
Article
Human aging is characterized by declines in cognition and fine motor function as well as improved emotional regulation. In men, declining levels of testosterone (T) with age have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes. However, studies examining the effects of T replacement on cognition, emotion and fine motor function in o...
Article
The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) provides many advantages over traditional rodent and macaque species as a model for human aging and may be very valuable to study the effects of sex steroids on cognitive and brain aging. We present the first study examining the effects of oestrogens on cognitive function in female marmosets. Adult monkeys (...
Article
Full-text available
We examined attentional biases for social and non-social emotional stimuli in young adult men and compared the results to those of male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) previously tested in a similar dot-probe task (King et al. in Psychoneuroendocrinology 37(3):396-409, 2012). Recognition memory for these stimuli was also analyzed in each species, u...
Article
Testosterone (T) has repeatedly been shown to have anxiolytic properties in rodents, but findings in primates are more mixed. To examine the effects of exogenous T on anxiety, we tested pharmacologically-castrated adult male rhesus monkeys in a modified version of the Human Intruder Paradigm, which measured defensive responses to an unfamiliar huma...
Article
The role of testosterone (T) in modulating cognitive function and emotion in men remains unclear. The paucity of animal studies has likely contributed to the slow progress in this area. In particular, studies in nonhuman primates have been lacking. Our laboratory has begun to address this issue by pharmacologically manipulating T levels in intact m...
Article
Studies in monkey models of menopause have greatly advanced our understanding of the effects of estrogens on women's cognitive health. Yet, parallel studies in male monkeys have been critically lacking and it remains unclear whether testosterone (T) replacement is a desirable intervention against age-related cognitive decline in men. In this chapte...
Article
Increasing evidence in humans and other animals suggests that testosterone (T) plays an important role in modulating emotion. We previously reported that T treatment in rhesus monkeys undergoing chemically induced hypogonadism results in increased watching time of videos depicting fights between unfamiliar conspecifics (Lacreuse et al., 2010). In t...
Article
Animal studies indicate that sex hormones have widespread effects on the brain, cognition and emotion, but findings in humans are inconsistent. Well-controlled studies in nonhuman primates are crucial to resolve these discrepancies. In this study, we examined the effects of testosterone (T) on emotion in male rhesus monkeys. Six young adult males w...
Article
The relationships between testosterone (T) and cognitive function remain unclear. In men, associations between endogenous T levels and cognitive performance have not consistently been found and the effects of T treatment on cognition remain ambiguous: several studies have reported beneficial effects of T administration on cognitive function, but re...
Article
Many studies in women and animal models suggest that estrogens affect cognitive function. Yet, the mechanisms by which estrogens may impact cognition remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of different estrogen receptor (ER) ligands on cognitive function in adult ovariectomized female rhesus monkeys. The monkeys wer...
Article
A long postreproductive lifespan may distinguish women from all other female primates. A long-held consensus among reproductive scientists has been that our closest living relative, the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), experiences menstrual cycles until death. However, a recent study of biannual assessments of gonadotropins, but lacking observations o...
Article
Little is known about the effects of the menstrual cycle on brain activity in primates. Here, we use 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to monitor changes in resting brain glucose metabolism across the menstrual cycle in female rhesus monkeys. Results showed greater activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, a region involved...
Article
Full-text available
The solid-state high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) technique was applied in this work to characterize and quantify the neurochemical changes in the rat hippocampus (CA1 or CA3) after local administration of kainic acid (KA). Intact tissue samples obtained from the KA treated and control brain samples were an...
Article
Full-text available
We retrieved ovarian sections taken from necropsies of 19 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) aged 0-47 yr, counted the number of primordial follicles in each, and compared the rate of decline in numbers to declines previously documented in humans. The follicular depletion rate in this sample was indistinguishable from that shown across the same...
Article
Full-text available
Fluctuations of ovarian hormones across the menstrual cycle influence a variety of social and cognitive behaviors in primates. For example, female rhesus monkeys exhibit heightened interest for males and increased agonistic interactions with other females during periods of high estrogen levels. In the present study, we hypothesized that females' pr...
Article
Studies of age-related changes in motor function in nonhuman primates have been based exclusively on unimanual motor tasks. In this study, we examined whether aging affects bimanual motor coordination in the monkey model. In addition, we compared performance of ovariectomized and intact females on the task, to examine whether estrogen deficiency im...
Article
Full-text available
Declines in fine motor skills and cognitive function are well known features of human aging. Yet, the relationship between age-related impairments in motor and cognitive function remains unclear. Rhesus monkeys, like humans, show marked decline in cognitive and fine motor function with age and are excellent models to investigate potential interacti...
Article
Several studies have suggested that estrogen benefits verbal memory and lowers the risk of Alzheimer's disease in women, and improves cognitive function in animal models. However, the negative outcome of the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study has challenged the rationale for using estrogen as a protective agent against age-related cognitive dec...
Article
The nigrostriatal system is critical for fine motor function and its deterioration during aging is thought to underlie the decline in fine manual ability of old persons. Because estrogen has a neuroprotective effect on this system, one might expect women's motor function to be less vulnerable to the detrimental effects of aging than that of men. We...
Article
Full-text available
The authors tested 90 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on a task of spatial memory, the spatial Delayed Recognition Span Test. The results showed that performance declined significantly with age, males had greater scores than females, and the rate of apparent decline with age was greater in males than in females. Both working and reference memory de...
Article
Functions supported by the frontal lobes are particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of aging. Recent studies on postmenopausal women find that estrogen replacement therapy benefits performance on tasks dependent on the frontal lobes. To determine whether estrogen has a similar influence in a rhesus monkey model of menopause, we tested fi...
Article
Estrogen deficiency following ovariectomy or menopause increases the risk of developing diseases such as osteoporosis and may also lead to memory impairment. Although estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) alleviates many symptoms associated with estrogen loss, it is not clear whether it also benefits cognitive function. The effect of estrogens upon co...
Article
Aging is characterized by a progressive deterioration of motor function related to dysfunctions of the nigrostriatal system. Because estrogen has been reported to protect dopaminergic neurons and to improve the motor deficits associated with Parkinson's disease, we hypothesized that it would partially reverse the age-related decline of motor functi...
Article
Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) alleviates many postmenopausal symptoms but whether it also benefits cognitive function remains controversial. Further, since estrogen increases the risk of breast and uterine cancers, a new class of compounds, called selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) is being considered as possible alternative to ERT...
Chapter
Full-text available
Nonhuman primates are indispensable for the study of aging processes. Like other animals, they permit us to observe the effects of age in the absence of the confounds inherent in studies of human beings. Additionally, because they are phylogenetically close to humans and possess certain uniquely primate morphological, endocrine, behavioral, and cog...
Article
Findings are inconsistent regarding whether women's cognitive performance fluctuates across phases of the menstrual cycle, but differences in methodology and the use of reported cycle phase rather than precise hormonal measures may underlie these disparities. Studies in monkeys may help resolve these discrepant findings, since hormonal status can b...
Article
Full-text available
To determine whether ovariectomy exacerbates age-related cognitive decline, the performance of 6 aged monkeys that had been ovariectomized early in life (OVX-Aged) was compared to that of 8 age-matched controls with intact ovaries (INT-Aged) and that of 5 young controls with intact ovaries (INT-Young) in tasks of visual recognition memory, object a...
Article
To determine whether endogenous DHEAS level is related to cognitive performance in the rhesus monkey, we tested 9 young and 14 old monkeys on the acquisition and the 120 s delay condition of the delayed non-matching to sample and on the spatial delayed recognition span test. A single summary measure of cognitive ability, the cognitive performance i...
Article
Twelve young (4-7 years of age) and 14 old (20-27 years of age) male and female rhesus monkeys were tested on seven cognitive tasks. Males and females performed similarly on tasks of object memory and executive function, but young males outperformed young females on a spatial memory task (Delayed Recognition Span Test) that requires the identificat...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the hand preferences of 20 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) for a haptic task requiring individuals to search for grapes in an opaque bucket filled with water. We compared these data to the hand preferences displayed by the same chimpanzees during reaching and bimanual feeding tasks. The chimpanzees displayed no significant hand preference f...
Article
Full-text available
Sixteen capuchins (Cebus apella) participated in four tasks that differed in their exploration demands and availability of visual cues. The two explorative tasks required the monkeys to discover sunflower seeds hidden in crevices in objects of various shapes, with vision (Haptic-Visual task) or without vision (Haptic task). Two other tasks required...
Article
Full-text available
Left-hand preferences in monkeys (capuchins, macaques) for haptic discriminations have been taken to indicate that the right hemisphere is more involved than the left hemisphere in solving these tasks. We confirmed this left-hand bias in a group of 21 capuchins haptically searching for sunflower seeds located in crevices in 12 different objects (La...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the effects of a haptic search task on hand preferences in capuchins(Cebus apella) and compare this situation to a visual by guided reaching task. In the haptic task, 21 monkeys searched for sunflower seeds on the top or side surfaces of 12 objects. A left-hand preference emerged at the group level, suggesting a greater involvement of the...
Article
Two baboons performed 2 types of haptic discrimination of three-dimensional object pairs, by using the right and left hands in the same number of trials. One task focused on the discrimination of the objects’ shape, another on the convexity or concavity of the objects. It was found that the left was better than the right hand to discriminate the sh...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effect of spatial factors and hemispheric lateralization upon hand-scanning strategies in 14 right-handed men tested in a tactual-tactual matching task. The experiment involved comparisons (judgments of same or different) between two objects sequentially touched by the fingertips of the left or right hand. Stimuli were made of smoot...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effect of spatial factors and hemispheric lateralization upon hand-scanning strategies in 14 right-handed men tested in a tactual—tactual matching task. The experiment involved comparisons (judgments of same or different) between two objects sequentially touched by the fingertips of the left or right hand. Stimuli were made of smoot...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on haptic processing show inconsistent results concerning sex and hand differences. We present a novel approach in which manual exploratory strategies were examined. Twenty-four right-handed adults of both sexes had to monohaptically explore unseen meaningless stimuli and then to recognize their visually presented outline drawings among dra...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Can DHED prevent the adverse effects of aromatase inhibition ?
Project
2/3 of AD cases are women. The menopausal transition is a critical endocrine stage that may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Studying how estrogens modulate cognition, sleep and thermoregulation is key to understanding female-specific trajectories of cognitive and brain aging
Project
Characterizing neurocognitive aging in the marmoset with special emphasis on sex differences