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Agnes-Katharina Kreiling

Agnes-Katharina Kreiling
Tjóðsavnið - Faroe Islands National Museum · Terrestrial Zoology

PhD | Diplom

About

12
Publications
3,020
Reads
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40
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in species distributions and diversity on islands and insular ecosystems such as springs and ponds. Hereby, I am focusing on Chironomidae (both larvae and pupal exuviae) and terrestrial Coleoptera (Carabidae, Staphylinidae, Silphidae, Curculionidae).
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - October 2020
Marine and Freshwater Research Institute
Position
  • Researcher
January 2018 - April 2020
University of Iceland
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Invertebrate Zoology
January 2018 - April 2019
University of Iceland
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • practical part of the course Insect Zoology
Education
July 2014 - October 2020
Hólar University and University of Iceland
Field of study
  • Freshwater ecology
October 2007 - June 2013
University of Freiburg
Field of study
  • Biology (Evolutionary Biology and Animal Ecology)

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
In many respects, freshwater springs can be considered as unique ecosystems on the fringe of aquatic habitats. This integrates their uniqueness in terms of stability of environmental metrics. The main objective of our study was to evaluate how environmental variables may shape invertebrate diversity and community composition in different freshwater...
Article
Full-text available
Many life-history events in aquatic invertebrates are triggered by seasonal changes in water temperature, but other ecological factors may be important as well. To rule out the confounding effects of changing water temperature, we studied the seasonal dynamics of an aquatic invertebrate community and their effect on a top fish predator in a thermal...
Chapter
Springs are ecosystems influenced by the exposure of groundwater at the Earth's surface. Springs are abundant and have played important, highly interactive ecological, cultural, and socio-economic roles in arid, mesic, and subaqueous environments throughout human evolution and history. However, springs also are widely regarded as being highly threa...
Article
Cold groundwater springs at the edges of lava fields along the volcanic active zone in Iceland are an interesting habitat, presenting an ecotone between groundwater, surface water and the terrestrial ecosystems. They are categorized as fennoscandian mineral-rich springs according to the European Nature Information System (EUNIS) classification (C2....
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to characterize the Trichoptera fauna of freshwater springs in Iceland and to relate distribution of caddis larvae to environmental properties of the springs. Out of a total of 48 springs sampled, Trichoptera larvae were found in only eleven. Larval densities were low, as was species diversity. Only three of the 12 species...
Article
Aquatic fungi are a largely unexplored group of organisms with a still unknown diversity of ecological niches. Groundwater biomes comprise vast but poorly explored habitats. In this study, we sampled the Icelandic groundwater, a unique system that has been separated and isolated into distinct basins for millions of years due to volcanic activity. T...
Article
Full-text available
DNA barcoding is an invaluable tool to identify clitellates, regardless of life stage or cryptic morphology. However, as COI (the standard barcode for animals) is relatively long (658 bp), sequencing it requires DNA of high quality. When DNA is fragmented due to degradation, alternative barcodes of shorter length present an option to obtain genetic...
Article
Full-text available
Crangonyx islandicus is a groundwater amphipod endemic to Iceland, considered to have survived the Ice Ages in subglacial refugia. Currently the species is found in spring sources in lava fields along the tectonic plate boundary of the country. The discovery of a groundwater species in this inaccessible habitat indicates a hidden ecosystem possibly...
Article
Full-text available
Ostracods in Icelandic freshwaters have seldom been researched, with the most comprehensive record from the 1930s. There is a need to update our knowledge of the distribution of ostracods in Iceland as they are an important link in these ecosystems as well as good candidates for biomonitoring. We analysed 25,005 ostracods from 44 lakes, 14 springs,...
Article
Full-text available
In 1937, S. L. Tuxen studied the animal community of hot springs in Iceland, and classified springs according to their relative temperature into cold, tepid, and hot. Eighty years after Tuxen’s study, we revisited some of the hot springs in Skagafjörður, Northern Iceland. Our aim was to compare the invertebrate community of 1937 and today, and to a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In 1937, the Danish biologist S. L. Tuxen visited Iceland and dedicated a couple of months to the study of the hot spring fauna of the country. His description of hot spring communities set a cornerstone for crenobiology and is still cited nowadays. He classified springs according to their relative temperature into cold, tepid, and hot springs, and...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am looking for a key for Thienemanniella (Orthocladiinae) of the Holarctic region, based on larval characters. Can anyone provide me with one? Or point out relevant literature I might have missed? Thanks!

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The world is undergoing major biodiversity changes, which emphasizes the need to understand the processes that create, maintain and alter biological diversity. In many ways, Icelandic freshwater systems constitute a natural laboratory which offers unique opportunities to research which factors may be important for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. This is especially true for the biota of groundwater and springs of Iceland, which are poorly known but potentially of high scientific interest. In the proposed study we will map biological diversity of groundwater and its ecotone zones, with surface water, in springs and rivers. We will especially focus on food web structure in groundwater habitats and how they connect to surface water. We predict that we will manage to connect observed diversity to ecological characters, especially temperature and nutrient availability. The results of the study will give important information on how we should use and protect our groundwater resource, in addition to having high scientific value.