Agnes Kandracs

Agnes Kandracs
Research Centre for Natural Sciences

PhD

About

6
Publications
625
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64
Citations
Introduction
Agnes Kandracs currently works at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Agnes does research in Digital Signal Processing, Computational Neuroscience and Electrophysiology. Their most recent publication is 'Hyperexcitability of the network contributes to synchronization processes in the human epileptic neocortex.'
Additional affiliations
November 2020 - November 2020
Research Centre for Natural Sciences
Position
  • Research Associate
February 2019 - July 2020
Roska Tamás Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Supervising bachelor students.
July 2017 - October 2020
Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Fellow
Education
September 2014 - August 2020
Roska Tamás Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University
Field of study
  • Neuroscience, IT
February 2012 - January 2014
Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University
Field of study
  • Info-bionics Engineering
September 2008 - January 2012
Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University
Field of study
  • Molecular Bionics

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge about the activity of single neurons is essential in understanding the mechanisms of synchrony generation, and particularly interesting if related to pathological conditions. The generation of interictal spikes—the hypersynchronous events between seizures—is linked to hyperexcitability and to bursting behaviour of neurons in animal models...
Article
Full-text available
Inhibitory neurons innervating the perisomatic region of cortical excitatory principal cells are known to control the emergence of several physiological and pathological synchronous events, including epileptic interictal spikes. In humans, little is known about their role in synchrony generation, although their changes in epilepsy have been thoroug...
Article
Full-text available
The use of SU-8 material in the production of neural sensors has grown recently. Despite its widespread application, a detailed systematic quantitative analysis concerning its biocompatibility in the central nervous system is lacking. In this immunohistochemical study, we quantified the neuronal preservation and the severity of astrogliosis around...
Article
Key points: Initiation of pathological synchronous events such as epileptic spikes and seizures is linked to the hyperexcitability of the neuronal network both in humans and animals. Here we show that epileptiform interictal-like spikes and seizures emerged in human neocortical slices by blocking GABAA receptors, following the disappearance of the...
Article
Key points: Hyperexcitability and hypersynchrony of neuronal networks are thought to be linked to the generation of epileptic activity in both humans and animal models. Here we show that human epileptic postoperative neocortical tissue is able to generate two different types of synchronies in vitro. Epileptiform bursts occurred only in slices deri...
Article
Full-text available
Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathin...

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