Agata S. Nalborczyk

Agata S. Nalborczyk
University of Warsaw | UW · Department for European Islam Studies, Faculty of Oriental Studies

Professor

About

35
Publications
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48
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2003 - present
University of Warsaw
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2003 - present
University of Warsaw
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (35)
Chapter
The memoir is unique in 18th-century Polish travel literature and among works on the Ottoman Empire and Muslims. Since Pilsztynowa had received no formal education in her homeland, she had had no exposure to the biased stereotypes of the Turks and Islam that the educated found in their European reading material, so she describes Islamic religion an...
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The MZR is the oldest Islamic religious organization in Poland – it was established by Polish-Lithuanian Muslim Tatars in 1925. After the introduction of Islamic religious education to public schools in 1919 and reintroduction in 1992, one of the main problems seemed to be the lack of proper, modern textbooks. Even though some new textbooks have be...
Article
The history of the Islamic presence in Poland goes back over 300 years. In the past, Muslim Tatar women played an important role in their communities by preserving and passing on the faith. In the twentieth century their role expanded, with a substantial number of women present at the highest levels of Muslim leadership. The article presents a case...
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Full-text available
Researchers of Islam in the West have noticed that imams working since the 1950s in Western Europe or the United States assume far more responsibilities than their counterparts in traditional Muslim societies. Consequently, further research had to identify and specify the types of imams who perform their service in the West-their most complete typo...
Book
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The researchers focused on various elements and finds, manuscripts by early Arab travellers, to direct travels by Poles and the memoirs they left, their participation in diplomatic relations with the Arab world, and finally to science, literature, and arts. The project also included studying the role of intermediaries of other ethnic origins in the...
Book
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This volume, the third in the series, is entitled The influence of Arab culture on handicraft, architecture, and painting in Poland. The material collected in this publication shows the diffusion of Arab-Muslim elements into Polish culture, which manifested itself in various fields and forms: construction, plastic arts, as well as the presence of h...
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Direct intercultural contact facilitates cultural transfer. Thus, the series includes the monograph by Hieronim Kaczmarek entitled Poles and Egypt until the First World War. Notes, diaries, and memories from travels, which presents the Polish-Arab relations in the context of the Poles’ travels to one of the most important Arabic countries, Egypt.
Chapter
In spite of the multiplicity of Muslim organisations in the country there are in fact two major providers of Islamic religious instruction in Poland. One is Tatar led Muslim Religious Union in the Republic of Poland (in Polish “Muzułmański Związek Religijny w Rzeczpospolitej Polskiej - hereafter MZR) set up yet before the Second World War in 1925 a...
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In Central and Eastern Europe, Muslims have been living for over 600 years and they are not only integrated within the local communities, but they also speak the languages of the countries they live in and feel a part of them. This issue escapes many scholars and experts in Islam, including those doing research on Islam in Europe, and above all, jo...
Book
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In the opening volume of the series, entitled First Polish-Arab contacts, the authors of particular contributions examine the origins of this cultural transfer: the earliest (indirect) contacts between the Arab and Polish cultures which led to written accounts of Poland and Slavs in Arabic, as well as Arab elements in the material heritage of the P...
Chapter
For centuries, Tatars did not have a high-level local religious authority and were subject to external religious leadership. In the first half of the 20th century, however, they created their first Poland-based religious organization and elected a mufti. Since then, Polish Muslims have been independent from external religious authorities, even thou...
Chapter
This chapter presents selected aspects of the cultural and religious life of Polish Muslim Tatars with a special focus on their religious practices. On the one hand, the Polish Muslim Tatars are part of the Muslim religious minority; on the other hand they are a cultural minority without necessary religious connotations, though most of them describ...
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European societies are secularized, religion becomes a private matter, the number of religiously indifferent people increases, so often the religious aspect is omitted in studies on the identity of individuals and societies. In the case of Polish Tatars, however, we do not only deal with an ethnic or cultural minority, but also (and perhaps above a...
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Egzegeza koraniczna z perspektywy kobiecej-sposób na muzułmański feminizm? Do XX w. egzegeza świętych tekstów religijnych była właściwie domeną mężczyzn, dopiero niedawno na tym polu pojawiły się kobiety. Nie jest oczywiście kwestią przypadku, że stało się to w czasie, gdy dla kobiet coraz szerzej dostępna stała się edukacja. Hermeneutyczne podejśc...
Article
Full-text available
The history of Islamic presence in Poland goes back over 300 years. In the past, Muslim Tatar women played an important role in their communities by preserving and passing on the faith. In the 20th century their role expanded, with a high number of women now present at the highest levels of Muslim leadership. Polish Tatar women play a very importan...
Chapter
Polish Tatars constitute a small but quite close-knit religious and ethnic minority. The present structure of the Polish Tatar minority was formed after the First World War, when Poland regained independence after 123 years of partitions. In spite of the 45 years of communist rule after the Second World War, Polish Tatars managed to preserve their...
Chapter
The legal status of Islam and Muslims in Europe is a complicated matter. On the one hand, it is in the domain of denominational law and state-church relations, and on the other, it is a product of history of Muslim presence in a particular country. There is no single pattern among European countries of regulating the relations between the state and...
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Relations between the Austrian state and Islam are quite unique for a European country. They can be divided into two stages marked by two significant events in the development of those relations. The first stage, from 1878 to 1918 was connected with the political events in the Balkans, in which Austria (then Austro-Hungarian Monarchy) was an active...
Chapter
Polish-Lithuanian Muslim Tatars are one of the traditional Polish minorities. They were the first Muslims to settle within the borders of Poland and Lithuania – countries united since 1385 by the ruler i.e. the king. In the fourteenth century, Tatars came to their new homeland from territories ruled by the Golden Horde which had been an Islamic sta...
Chapter
One of the oldest established Muslim minorities in Central Europe is that of the Tatars, whose history dates back to the fourteenth century. They settled in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth mostly as mercenaries brought to fight the enemies of the country. This chapter recounts how, in return for military service, Tatars were granted land togethe...
Chapter
Islam has been present on the territory of the modern-day Poland for over 330 years, which makes it one of the traditional, officially recognized religions, even though the number of Muslims in Poland is not large. At present, the estimated number of Muslims in Poland is 15,000–30,000, which amounts to 0.04-0.08 per cent of the total population (Na...
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Wird Polen im Zusammenhang mit dem Thema Religion er-wähnt, so ergibt sich durch blitzartige Assoziationen, dass alle Polen zweifelsohne römisch-katholisch sind: der polnische Papst, die massenhaften Pilgerfahrten zu seiner Beerdigung und Selig-sprechung, der neue Papst Benedikt XVI., der Polnisch lernt und die Polen jeden Sonntag mit dem Angelusge...
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Full-text available
Relations between the Polish state and Muslims living in its territory have a long history dating back to the fourteenth century, when a Muslim presence was first established in the area. The first Muslims to arrive in Poland were Tatars from the Golden Horde. Their influx continued for a few centuries and they were granted land in exchange for mil...
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There are three purpose built mosques in Poland, with another mosque currently under construction. However, many more buildings of this kind existed in Poland in the past, owing to the traditionally tolerant laws for religious minorities, including the Muslim faith. During the first half of the 20th century, however, there were cases when it was im...
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Full-text available
Eastern Europe is a very interesting region in terms of the presence of Muslims. They have been living there for more than 600 years. This mere fact escapes the attention of many researchers and experts in Islam, including European Islam, and above all it escapes the attention of the journalists from Western Europe. Usually, they write about Islam...
Chapter
Full-text available
Muslims have been living in the territories of present-day Poland and Lithuania for over 600 years. Their history is described in numerous works, which, however, concentrate on Muslim participation in armed fighting and their legal and political situation. It can be concluded, based on the very sparse mentions of Tatar women and their legal, politi...
Article
Until the middle of the twentieth century, Muslims living in European countries were mainly indigenous people, completely assimilated with the rest of the population. Both their religion and their representative organizations enjoyed legal recognition, sometimes centuries long.A significant influx of immigrants of Muslim origin to Europe began in t...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
In order to understand the present day dimensions of mutual perceptions between Christians and Muslims, the history of relations must be recovered and accurately mapped. This work is currently being undertaken in an international project led by David Thomas, Professor Emeritus of the University of Birmingham. Its outcome is the series Christian-Muslim Relations: a Bibliographical History. Each volume contains detailed descriptions and assessments of texts written by the one community about or against the other, together with introductory and contextual essays, and an index, providing an important tool for future research. The first phase, Christian-Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History 1 (CMR1), covers the crucial period 600 to 1500 (volumes 1-5). The second phase (“CMR1900”), which will take the project up to the end of the First World War, is a work in progress. So far 11 volumes of CMR have been published. Christian Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History is published as a sub-series of the History of Christian-Muslim Relations book series (Brill).
Project
The purpose of the Action is to provide a transnational and interdisciplinary approach capable of overcoming the segmentation that currently characterizes the study of relations between Christianity and Islam in late medieval and early modern Europe and the Mediterranean. Over the last thirty years, some separate geographic and academic areas have been defined in this research field: the Iberian Peninsula, Italy, Central Europe and the Balkans, and Greece and the different islands of the Mediterranean. These different geographical areas have been analysed in isolation and have been further disjointed in a scientific context defined by the separation of disciplines and chronologies. The intention of the Action is to mitigate this academic distortion by creating a common space for scientific exchange and reflection. This space will involve institutions from 26 different European and Mediterranean countries as well as 59 senior and junior researchers coming from different disciplines (history, history of art, philology, anthropology, social sciences, history of the science, politics, etc.). The creation of this network will help to provide a comprehensive understanding of past relations between Christianity and Islam in the European context through the addressing of three main research problems: otherness, migration and borders. Beyond the strictly academic realm, the Action also aims to revive diversity and Euro-Mediterranean relations in education, at a moment when Europe is at a cultural and political crossroads.
Project
Badanie transferu kulturowego elementów arabskiej kultury w kulturze polskiej. Redaktorzy serii: dr Mustafa Switat, dr hab. Agata S. Nalborczyk