Agata Buchwal

Agata Buchwal
Adam Mickiewicz University | UAM · Institute of Geoecology and Geoinformation

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43
Publications
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1,565
Citations

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Tundra shrubs reflect climate sensitivities in their growth-ring widths, yet tissue-specific shrub chronologies are poorly studied. Further, the relative importance of regional climate patterns that exert mesoscale precipitation and temperature influences on tundra shrub growth has been explored in only a few Arctic locations. Here, we investigate...
Article
Full-text available
Thermokarst disturbance in permafrost landscapes is likely to increase across the tundra biome with climate warming, resulting in changes to topography, vegetation, and biogeochemical cycling. Tundra shrubs grow on permafrost, but shrub–thermokarst relationships are rarely studied in detail. Since the 1980s, Alaska's North Slope has experienced inc...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming has pronounced effects on tundra vegetation, and rising mean temperatures increase plant growth potential across the Arctic biome. Herbivores may counteract the warming impacts by reducing plant growth, but the strength of this effect may depend on prevailing regional climatic conditions. To study how ungulates interact with temperat...
Article
Our understanding of wood anatomy and radial growth in tree roots remains very incomplete, particularly with respect to how ecological factors affect root growth at a relatively small spatial scale, i.e., within a single root system. Here, we compared root growth with and without trampling exposure on a hiking trail. We conducted a quantitative ana...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative measurements of aeolian activity at high latitudes are not currently carried out on a large scale, even though these processes are important elements of the geomorphic system of polar regions, which are particularly affected by climate change. This study presents the results of aeolian deposition rates measured and calculated for one o...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic sea ice extent (SIE) is declining at an accelerating rate with a wide range of ecological consequences. However, determining sea ice effects on tundra vegetation remains a challenge. In this study, we examined the universality or lack thereof in tundra shrub growth responses to changes in SIE and summer climate across the Pan-Arctic, taking...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of hiking in forested areas is one of the main factors affecting the condition of tree growth along hiking trails. Trampling causes common exposure of roots and quantification of the human impact on root radial growth and wood anatomy requires careful assessment. To accurately identify the radial growth changes in Pinus sylvestris roots,...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of variation in six traits critical to the growth, survival and reproduction of plant species is thought to be organised along just two dimensions, corresponding to strategies of plant size and resource acquisition. However, it is unknown whether global plant trait relationships extend to climatic extremes, and if these interspecific r...
Article
Climate change is most pronounced at high latitudes, where plant and animal populations are often strongly influenced by environmental fluctuations related to climate and weather. Environmental conditions can co‐fluctuate over large distances and thereby synchronise primary production in space. However, large‐scale studies of such spatiotemporal pa...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Plant functional groups are widely used in community ecology and earth system modelling to describe trait variation within and across plant communities. However, this approach rests on the assumption that functional groups explain a large proportion of trait variation among species. We test whether four commonly used plant functional groups rep...
Article
Climate condtions constitute some of the main factors affecting variation in annual tree-ring growth. However other exogenous processes including geomorphic activity can affect substantially the rate of tree growth. Currently little is known on how human activity such as trampling affects tree growth along hiking trails. We analyzed annual growth v...
Article
1.Long time‐series of primary production are rarely available, restricting our mechanistic understanding of vegetation and ecosystem dynamics under climate change. Dendrochronological tools are increasingly used instead, particularly in the Arctic – the world's most rapidly warming biome. Yet, high‐latitude plant species are subject to strong energ...
Article
Full-text available
The High Arctic region has experienced marked climate fluctuations within the past decades strongly affecting tundra shrub growth. However, the spatial variability in dwarf shrub growth responses in this remote region remains largely unknown. This study characterizes temperature sensitivity of radial growth of two willow dwarf shrub species from tw...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation: The Tundra Trait Team (TTT) database includes field‐based measurements of key traits related to plant form and function at multiple sites across the tundra biome. This dataset can be used to address theoretical questions about plant strategy and trade‐offs, trait–environment relationships and environmental filtering, and trait variation...
Article
Full-text available
The tundra is warming more rapidly than any other biome on Earth, and the potential ramifications are far-reaching because of global feedback effects between vegetation and climate. A better understanding of how environmental factors shape plant structure and function is crucial for predicting the consequences of environmental change for ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
The above mentioned article was originally scheduled for publication in the special issue on Ecology of Tundra Arthropods with guest editors Toke T. Høye . Lauren E. Culler. Erroneously, the article was published in Polar Biology, Volume 40, Issue 11, November, 2017. The publisher sincerely apologizes to the guest editors and the authors for the in...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic, low intensity herbivory by invertebrates, termed background herbivory, has been understudied in tundra, yet its impacts are likely to increase in a warmer Arctic. The magnitude of these changes is however hard to predict as we know little about the drivers of current levels of invertebrate herbivory in tundra. We assessed the intensity of...
Article
Full-text available
1. Observational and experimental studies have generally shown that warming is associated with greater growth and abundance of deciduous shrubs in arctic ecosystems. It is uncertain, however, if this trend will persist in the future. 2. Our study examined growth responses of deciduous shrubs to climate change over the late 20th and early 21st cen...
Article
Rapid climate warming has resulted in shrub expansion, mainly of erect deciduous shrubs in the Low Arctic, but the more extreme, sparsely vegetated, cold and dry High Arctic, is generally considered to remain resistant to such shrub expansion in the next decades. Dwarf shrub dendrochronology may reveal climatological causes of past changes in growt...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has been reported to affect shrub growth positively at several sites at high northern latitudes, including several arctic environments. The observed growth rates are, however, not uniform in space and time, and the mechanistic drivers of these patterns remain poorly understood. Here we investigated spatio-temporal interactions betwee...
Poster
Full-text available
To test whether retrospective ring growth of polar willows (Salix polaris) represents an adequate proxy for annual variation in above ground biomass production.
Conference Paper
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Tourism impact, such as trampling erosion in protected forested areas, is one of the main concerns for land managers. The impact by trampling is easily visible at locations of highly concentrated tourist traffic, such as on hiking trails. Trampling activity together with natural geomorphic processes is responsible for the exposure of roots on trail...
Article
Rapid climate warming in the tundra biome has been linked to increasing shrub dominance. Shrub expansion can modify climate by altering surface albedo, energy and water balance, and permafrost yet the drivers of shrub growth remain poorly understood. Dendroecological data consisting of multi-decadal time series of annual shrub growth provide an und...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To date, the effects of tsunami have been mainly reported from tropical and temperate regions. Tsunami in polar regions have been mainly recorded in fjords, which are particularly prone to hazards associated with landslide-generated tsunamis. The rapid climate warming being observed in the high latitudes effects in an increase of human activities i...
Article
Full-text available
Growing season conditions are widely recognized as the main driver for tundra shrub radial growth, but the effects of winter warming and snow remain an open question. Here, we present a more than 100 years long Betula nana ring-width chronology from Disko Island in western Greenland that demonstrates a highly significant and positive growth respons...
Article
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We test the application of dendrochronological methods for dating and assessing the environmental impacts of tsunamis in polar regions, using an example of the 21 November 2000 landslide−generated tsunami in Vaigat Strait (Sullorsuaq Strait), West Greenland. The studied tsunami inundated a c. 130 m−wide coastal plain with seawater, caused erosion o...
Article
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Application of tundra shrubs in dendrochronological studies is recently increasing. However their growth rings are characterized by high irregularity which cause a common tree-ring dating problems. The goal of the study is to demonstrate a dendrochronological potential of common tundra species Salix polaris from central Spitsbergen (Ebbadalen, Petu...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic ecosystems are important carbon sinks. Increasing temperatures in these regions might stimulate soil carbon release. Evidence suggests that deciduous shrubs might counteract these carbon losses because they positively respond to increasing temperature, but their role in ecosystem carbon budgets remains uncertain. Many studies dealing with la...
Conference Paper
Recent warming is expected to dramatically modify the arctic terrestrial ecosystem and woody plants growth. Many studies dealing with Arctic shrubs growth responses to temperature usually base their estimations on biomass measurements of only the above-ground segments neglecting the below-ground growth. In this context, the study of shrub-rings can...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To date, the effects of tsunami erosion and deposition have mainly been reported from tropical and temperate climatic zones yet tsunamis are also frequent in polar zones, particularly in fjord settings where they can be generated by landslides. Here we report the geological effects of a landslide-triggered tsunami that occurred on 21st November 200...
Article
Full-text available
Abstrakt. Górne, zalesione czêoeci zlewni górskich cechuj¹ siê du¿¹ retencyjnooeci¹, odp³ywem podziemnym oraz niezorganizowanym i epizodycznym sp³ywem po-wierzchniowym, a ich rozwój jest zwi¹zany g³ównie ze zdarzeniami ekstremalnymi. Jednym z g³ównych celów analiz by³o okreoelenie kierunku ods³aniania korzeni, które pozwala na odró¿nienie procesów...
Article
Full-text available
Hiking impact has a great influence on the mountain environment and is a big concern for managers of protected areas. Most of negative effects of trampling, such as soil erosion and vegetation loss, result in a permanent trail erosion and relief transformations. The study presents the existing and possible ways of mitigation of trail deteriorati...
Article
Full-text available
High mountain areas are characterized by substantial geodiversity and different morphogenetic processes play a key role in shaping their relief. One of the most transformed landforms within the high mountain areas affected by such processes today are footpaths and tourist trails. For this reason, this issue needs to be closely examined for a variet...
Article
Full-text available
Dendrogeomorphological analyses were conducted in order to estimate the age and the origin of two selected landslides on the coast of Wolin Island. For this pilot study beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) roots were taken from the upper part of the landslide niche. All samples have shown an abrupt changes of their growth during the vegetation period. This f...

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Projects (2)
Project
A large landslide on November 21st 2000 in Disko Bugt (West Greenland) triggered a tsunami with a run-up height of 50 m close to the landslide and 28 m at an abandoned town, 20 km away. Large waves, up to 5 m in height, are also regularly generated here and elsewhere in Greenland by iceberg roll and calving events and might be related to dynamics of major ice-streams.The past occurrence of these large waves is not known. The aim of this research project is to undertake field and laboratory investigations of sedimentary deposits from coastal lakes in Disko Bugt, West Greenland, to assess the evidence for large waves generated by these processes during the last 10,000 years.