Adriana L. Romero-Olivares

Adriana L. Romero-Olivares
New Mexico State University | NMSU · Department of Biology

PhD in Biological Sciences

About

26
Publications
8,268
Reads
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520
Citations
Introduction
Soil microbiologist working at the intersection of ecosystem ecology and evolution
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - March 2016
University of California, Irvine
Position
  • Teaching Assistant for Biology from organisms to ecosystems
September 2015 - December 2015
University of California, Irvine
Position
  • Teaching Assistant for Biology: DNA to Organisms
April 2014 - June 2014
University of California, Irvine
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2012 - December 2014
University of California, Irvine
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
September 2012 - June 2017
University of California, Irvine
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences
August 2008 - December 2010
Autonomous University of Baja California
Field of study
  • Molecular Ecology

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Background Short-term experiments have indicated that warmer temperatures can alter fungal biomass production and CO2 respiration, with potential consequences for soil C storage. However, we know little about the capacity of fungi to adapt to warming in ways that may alter C dynamics. Thus, we exposed Neurospora discreta to moderately warm (16 °C)...
Article
Numerous field studies have found changes in soil respiration and microbial abundance under experimental warming. Yet, it is uncertain whether the magnitude of these responses remains consistent over the long-term. We performed a meta-analysis on 25 field experiments to examine how warming effects on soil respiration, microbial biomass, and soil mi...
Article
Full-text available
Earth’s temperature is rising, and with this increase, fungal communities are responding and affecting soil carbon processes. At a long-term soil-warming experiment in a boreal forest in interior Alaska, warming and warming-associated drying alters the function of microbes, and thus, decomposition of carbon. But what genetic mechanisms and resource...
Article
Full-text available
Fungi are mediators of the nitrogen and carbon cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Examining how nitrogen uptake and organic matter decomposition potential differs in fungi can provide insight into the underlying mechanisms driving fungal ecological processes and ecosystem functioning. In this study, we assessed the frequency of genes encoding for sp...
Article
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play crucial roles in ecosystems at multiple scales, ranging from mediating soil microbial interactions to contributing to atmospheric chemistry. However, soil VOCs and how they respond to environmental change remains understudied. We aimed to assess how 2 abiotic global change drivers, soil warming and si...
Article
Full-text available
The practice of Global North (i.e., “richer” globalized countries located in the northern hemisphere, except for Australia and New Zealand) researchers making roundtrips to the Global South (i.e., “poorer” developing countries located around the tropics and in the Southern hemisphere) to collect materials and then process, analyze, and publish resu...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are inextricably linked to each other and our natural world, and microorganisms lie at the nexus of those interactions. Microorganisms form genetically flexible, taxonomically diverse, and biochemically rich communities, i.e., microbiomes that are integral to the health and development of macroorganisms, societies, and ecosystems. Yet engage...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are inextricably linked to each other and our natural world, and microorganisms lie at the nexus of those interactions. Microorganisms form genetically flexible, taxonomically diverse, and biochemically rich communities, i.e., microbiomes that are integral to the health and development of macroorganisms, societies, and ecosystems. Humans are...
Article
Full-text available
A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00248-021-01776-x
Article
Full-text available
To make predictions about the carbon cycling consequences of rising global surface temperatures, Earth system scientists rely on mathematical soil biogeochemical models (SBMs). However, it is not clear which models have better predictive accuracy, and a rigorous quantitative approach for comparing and validating the predictions has yet to be establ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. To make predictions about the effect of rising global surface temperatures, we rely on mathematical soil biogeochemical models (SBMs). However, it is not clear which models have better predictive accuracy, and a rigorous quantitative approach for comparing and validating the predictions has yet to be established. In this study, we present...
Article
Fungal metabolic rates could increase under climate warming but may be counteracted by mechanisms of physiological acclimation and evolutionary adaptation. We hypothesized that Vmax and Km parameters of Neurospora discreta extracellular enzymes would acclimate to warmer temperatures through compensatory mechanisms. We also predicted that evolution...
Article
The magnitude and direction of carbon cycle feedbacks under climate warming remain uncertain due to insufficient knowledge about the temperature sensitivities of soil microbial processes. Enzymatic rates could increase at higher temperatures, but this response could change over time if soil microbes adapt to warming. We used the Arrhenius relations...
Article
Full-text available
Over the long term, soil carbon (C) storage is partly determined by decomposition rate of carbon that is slow to decompose (i.e., recalcitrant C). According to thermodynamic theory, decomposition rates of recalcitrant C might differ from those of non-recalcitrant C in their sensitivities to global warming. We decomposed leaf litter in a warming exp...
Data
Mass loss of each carbon fraction per plot. (XLSX)
Data
Litter chemistry in litter decomposed in control and warmed plots. (PDF)
Article
Fungal community composition often shifts in response to warmer temperatures, which might influence decomposition of recalcitrant carbon (C). We hypothesized that evolutionary trade-offs would enable recalcitrant C-using taxa to respond more positively to warming than would labile C-using taxa. Accordingly, we performed a warming experiment in an A...
Article
Full-text available
Fungi play fundamental ecological roles in terrestrial ecosystems. However, their distribution and diversity remain poorly described in natural communities, particularly in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In order to identify environmental factors determining fungal community structure in these systems, we assessed their diversity in conjunction with...
Article
Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) represents a serious threat to inhabitants of endemic areas of North America. Despite successful clinical isolations of the fungal etiological agent, Coccidioides spp., the screening of environmental samples has had low effectiveness, mainly because of the poor characterization of Coccidioides ecological niche. We...
Article
Approximately four-fifths of the land area of Baja California (BC) in Mexico are occupied by arid and semiarid soils, the mycobiota of which is virtually uncharacterized. In the first culture-independent study of the mycobiota of BC, we collected soil from five different locations in the region and constructed a Dikarya-specific gene library for th...
Article
Full-text available
Coccidioidomycosis is an important human fungal infection of American deserts and nearby semi-arid regions with highly endemic areas distributed along the United States-Mexico border. Despite the increasing incidence in the last 20 yr, reports of positive isolations of the causal agent, Coccidioides spp. from environmental samples have been scarce....

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I've been sing CTAB to try to extract genomic DNA of fungi for whole genome sequencing. I've attached a photo of how most of my samples look. Can you tell me what's going on? I know I have a lot of RNA. I am using purelink RNAse A but I guess it's not working. My question is: 
Do I have genomic DNA? Is it all degraded? The first band of the ladder is 23,130 bp. I'm using DNA-HindIII

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