Adrian Meier

Adrian Meier
Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg | FAU

Dr.

About

49
Publications
68,640
Reads
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928
Citations
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor for Communication Science at the Friedrich Alexander University (FAU) of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. My research focusses on the positive and negative effects of communication technology on mental health and well-being. I investigate this relationship through the lens of self-regulation and social comparison processes, using short-term longitudinal and experimental designs as well as systematic review methodology. Find me on Twitter @admeierlab
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - January 2021
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
April 2015 - September 2020
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
April 2015 - August 2020
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Field of study
  • Communication Science
October 2013 - March 2015
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Field of study
  • Communication Science
January 2013 - June 2013
University of Gothenburg
Field of study
  • Media and Communication

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
Procrastinating with popular online media such as Facebook has been suggested to impair users' well-being, particularly among students. Building on recent procrastination, self-control, and communication literature, we conducted two studies (total N = 699) that examined the predictors of procrastination with Facebook as well as its effects on stude...
Chapter
Full-text available
The relationship between computer-mediated communication (e.g., Internet or social media use) and mental health has been a long-standing issue of debate. Various disciplines (e.g., communication, psychology, sociology, medicine) investigate computer-mediated communication in relation to a great variety of negative (i.e., psychopathology) and positi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Using media, specifically those that offer entertainment, frequently conflicts with other goals and obligations in daily life. Users can manage these conflicts either by applying self-control and upholding their goals, or by giving in to media temptations, which elicits negative emotional appraisals such as guilt that potentially spoil entertainmen...
Article
Full-text available
Computer-mediated communication (CMC), and specifically social media, may affect the mental health (MH) and well-being of its users, for better or worse. Research on this topic has accumulated rapidly, accompanied by controversial public debate and numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Yet, a higher-level integration of the multiple dispar...
Article
Full-text available
Passive exposure to others’ positive self-presentations on social network sites (SNS) such as Instagram has been repeatedly associated with reduced well-being, particularly by triggering upward social comparison and envy. However, prior research has largely neglected that upward comparisons on SNS may also facilitate positive outcomes, specifically...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is popular concern that adolescents’ social media use, especially via smartphones, leads to irrational delay of intended tasks (i.e., procrastination). Automatic social media use and frequent phone checking may especially contribute to procrastination. Prior research has investigated this through between-person associations. We advance the li...
Preprint
Full-text available
The effect of social media use on well-being is among the hottest debates in academia and society at large. Adults and adolescents alike spend around 2-3 hours per day on social media, and they typically use five to seven different platforms in a complementary way, to chat with their friends, to browse others’ posts, and present themselves to their...
Article
Full-text available
Using mobile media can be both detrimental and beneficial for well-being. Thus, explaining how and when they elicit such effects is of crucial importance. To explicate boundary conditions and processes for digital well-being, this article introduces the Integrative Model of Mobile Media Use and Need Experiences (IM³UNE). Instead of assuming mobile...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research into the effects of social media on well-being often distinguishes “active” and “passive” use, with passive use supposedly more harmful to well-being (i.e., the passive use hypothesis). Recently, several studies and reviews have begun to question this hypothesis and its conceptual basis, the active/passive dichotomy. As this dichotomy has...
Article
Full-text available
Self-presentation on social network sites (SNS) such as Instagram is often assumed to be inauthentic or even fake. While authenticity on SNS has been linked to increased well-being, most research has investigated it either monolithically (e.g., via screen time measures) or with regard to stable self-presentations (e.g., in Facebook profiles). In co...
Article
Full-text available
There is both public and scholarly concern that (passive) social media use decreases well-being by providing a fertile ground for harmful (upward) social comparison and envy. The present review critically summarizes evidence on this assumption. We first comprehensively synthesize existing evidence, including both prior reviews and the most recent p...
Preprint
Social media literacy is assumed to protect adolescents from negative social media effects, yet research supporting this is lacking. The current three-wave panel study among N = 1,032 adolescents tests this moderating role of social media literacy. Specifically, we examine between- vs. within-person relations of exposure to the positivity bias, soc...
Article
Full-text available
Most prior research on the effects of mobile and social media on well-being has worked from either the "technology addiction" or "screen time" approach. Yet these frameworks struggle with considerable conceptual and methodological limitations. The present study discusses and tests an established but understudied alternative, the technology habit ap...
Article
Full-text available
Literature reviews on how social media use affects adolescent mental health have accumulated at an unprecedented rate of late. Yet, a higher-level integration of the evidence is still lacking. We fill this gap with an up-to-date umbrella review, a review of reviews published between 2019 and mid 2021. Our search yielded 25 reviews: seven meta-analy...
Preprint
Full-text available
Literature reviews on how social media use affects adolescent mental health have accumulated at an unprecedented rate of late. Yet, a higher-level integration of the evidence is still lacking. We fill this gap with an up-to-date umbrella review, a review of reviews published between 2019 and mid 2021. Our search yielded 25 reviews: seven meta-analy...
Preprint
Full-text available
Using mobile media can be both detrimental and beneficial for well-being. Thus, explaining how and when they elicit such effects is of crucial importance. To explicate boundary conditions and processes for digital well-being, this article introduces the Integrative Model of Mobile Media Use and Need Experiences (IM³UNE). Instead of assuming mobile...
Preprint
Full-text available
Do social media affect users’ mental health and well-being? By now, considerable research has addressed this highly contested question. Prior studies have investigated the effects of social media use on hedonic well-being (e.g., affect and life satisfaction), psychopathology (e.g., depressive or anxiety symptoms), or psychosocial risk/resilience fa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Self-presentation on social network sites (SNS) such as Instagram is often assumed to be inauthentic or even fake. While authenticity on SNS has been linked to increased well-being, most research has investigated it either monolithically (e.g., via screen time measures) or with regard to stable self-presentations (e.g., in Facebook profiles). In co...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile messaging has been associated with guilt. Guilt about too much messaging may result from self-control failures during goal conflicts. Conversely, guilt about too little messaging may result from violating the salient norm to be available. This research considers both boundary conditions of guilt about mobile communication—goal conflicts and...
Article
Full-text available
Concerns have been expressed that permanent online connectedness might negatively affect media user’s stress levels. Most research has focused on negative effects of specific media usage patterns, such as media multitasking or communication load. In contrast, users’ cognitive orientation toward online content and communication has rarely been inves...
Chapter
Full-text available
Media use is often referred to as a “guilty pleasure.” In fact, a growing number of studies provide empirical evidence of a high prevalence of guilt reactions to media use. Negative self‐conscious emotions such as guilt are elicited by actions or events that are incongruent with the individual's personal standards or identity goals. In the context...
Article
Full-text available
Through communication technology, users find themselves constantly connected to others to such an extent that they routinely develop a mind-set of connectedness. This mind-set has been defined as online vigilance. Although there is a large body of research on media use and well-being, the question of how online vigilance impacts well-being remains...
Preprint
Full-text available
Computer-mediated communication (CMC), and specifically social media, may affect the mental health (MH) and well-being of its users, for good or bad. Research on this topic has accumulated rapidly, accompanied by controversial public debate and numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Yet, a higher-level integration of the various disparate c...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the negative psycho-emotional implications of social comparisons on social network sites such as Instagram has rapidly accumulated in recent years. However, little research has considered the extent to which such comparisons can elicit positive motivational outcomes for adolescent users, specifically inspiration. Furthermore, little is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Through communication technology, users find themselves constantly connected to others to such an extent that they routinely develop a mindset of connectedness. This mindset has been defined as online vigilance. Although there is a large body of research on media use and well-being, the question of how online vigilance impacts well-being remains un...
Method
Full-text available
This document contains the English Version of the Online Vigilance Scale (Reinecke et al., 2018). The scale can be freely used for non-commercial, scientific purposes. Further information concerning the construction and psychometric properties of the original scale can also be found in Reinecke et al. (2018).
Method
Full-text available
This document provides a Chinese translation of the Online Vigilance Scale (Reinecke et al., 2018). The scale can be freely used for non-commercial, scientific purposes. Further information concerning the construction and psychometric properties of the original scale can also be found in Reinecke et al. (2018).
Method
Full-text available
Das beigefügte Dokument listet die deutschsprachigen Items der Online Vigilance Scale (Reinecke et al., 2018). Die Skala darf für nicht-kommerzielle, wissenschaftliche Zwecke unter Nennung der Originalquelle (siehe unten) frei verwendet werden. Weiter Angaben zum Skalenkonstruktionsprozess, den psychometrischen Eigenschaften und der Anwendung und...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep experts have raised concern over the effects of electronic media use on sleep. To date, few studies have looked beyond the effects of duration and frequency of media exposure or examined the underlying mechanisms of this association. As procrastinatory media use has been related to lower well-being, we used data from two survey studies (N1= 8...
Article
Full-text available
Digitale Autonomie, hier verstanden als das selbstbestimmte Handeln in der privaten interpersonalen digitalen Kommunikation, ist in unserem von Kommunikation durchzogenen Alltag möglicherweise ein zentraler Faktor für die psychische Gesundheit geworden. Basierend auf der Selbstbestimmungstheorie untersucht dieser Beitrag daher, inwieweit sich indiv...
Article
Full-text available
As mobile technology allows users to be online anywhere and at all times, a growing number of users report feeling constantly alert and preoccupied with online streams of online information and communication-a phenomenon that has recently been termed online vigilance. Despite its growing prevalence, consequences of this constant orientation toward...
Article
Full-text available
Smartphones and other mobile devices have fundamentally changed patterns of Internet use in everyday life by making online access constantly available. The present paper offers a theoretical explication and empirical assessment of the concept of online vigilance, referring to users’ permanent cognitive orientation towards online content and communi...
Preprint
Full-text available
As mobile technology allows users to be online anywhere and at all times, a growing number of users report feeling constantly alert and preoccupied with online streams of online information and communication—a phenomenon that has recently been termed online vigilance. Despite its growing prevalence, the consequences of this constant orientation tow...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of research finds social network sites (SNS) such as Instagram to facilitate social comparison and the emotional experience of envy in everyday life, with harmful effects for users' well-being. Yet, previous research has exclusively focused on the negative side of social comparison and envy on SNS. Thereby, it has neglected two impor...
Article
Full-text available
Adolescents with a strong tendency for irrational task delay (i.e., high trait procrastination) may be particularly prone to use Internet applications simultaneously to other tasks (e.g., during homework) and in an insufficiently controlled fashion. Both Internet multitasking and insufficiently controlled Internet usage may thus amplify the negativ...
Article
Full-text available
The pervasive access to media options seriously challenges users’ self-regulatory abilities. One example of deficient self-regulation in the context of media use is procrastination—impulsively ‘giving in’ to available media options despite goal conflicts with more important tasks. This study investigaes procrastinatory media use across 3 types of m...
Article
Full-text available
A growing number of studies suggest that Internet users frequently utilize online media as “tools for procrastination.” This study thus investigated the relationship between trait procrastination, Internet use, and psychological well-being in a representative sample of N = 1,577 German Internet users. The results revealed that trait procrastination...
Article
Full-text available
The authors regret a copy and paste error in the method section of Study 1 (p. 69). One of the four items of our measure of procrastination with Facebook is not reported correctly. Instead of the correct item (“I used Facebook while procrastinating upcoming work.”) the item “I used Facebook although I had more important things to do.” is listed twi...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the present chapter we propose that in a media saturated environment, self-control is a key variable providing a more complete understanding of the complex interactions of media use and well-being: In the face of ubiquitous access to media content, users find it increasingly difficult to maintain a balance between the short-term pleasures of med...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This multi-study project aims to review the research on CMC, social media, and their effects on mental health and well-being through a series of systematic literature reviews. The goal is to integrate the vast and fragmented interdisciplinary literature in this field both theoretically and empirically, using novel literature synthesis techniques (e.g., computational scoping reviews and meta-reviews/overviews).
Project
Over the last few years, the fast growing dissemination of ‘always on’ technologies such as smartphones and mobile Internet connections has fundamentally changed the communication patterns of many users. More and more users are “permanently online and permanently connected” or ‘POPC’ (Vorderer et al. 2018) and almost constantly engage in online interactions. In this new communication environment, users have not only developed new routines of ‘POPC-behavior’ but also new cognitive structures, a ‘POPC-mindset’ characterized by a constant cognitive orientation towards the online context. The concept of online vigilance aims at a theoretical explication of the psychological process underlying this constant connectedness. Online vigilance refers to individual differences in three aspects of users’ psychology: “(1) their cognitive orientation to permanent, ubiquitous online connectedness; (2) their chronic attention to and continuous integration of online-related cues and stimuli into their thinking and feeling; and (3) their motivational disposition to prioritize options for online communication over other (offline) behavior” (Reinecke et al., 2018, p. 2). The Online Vigilance Scale (OVS) provides an empirical measure of online vigilance and assesses three subdimensions of the construct: 1) Salience (i.e., the constant cognitive engagement with the online environment), 2) reactibility (i.e., continuous inclination to respond and to prioritize events and cues from the online sphere over the demands of the current offline environment), and 3) monitoring (i.e., the frequent pro-active checking of the online environment). The Online Vigilance Scale is currently available in English, German, and Chinese (all three versions are accessible here) and can be freely used for non-commercial, scientific purposes. When you use the scale in your research, please cite Reinecke et al. (2018) as the original source of the scale. Further information on the development of the scale and its psychometric properties can also be found in Reinecke et al. (2018). For additional information on the theoretical explication of online vigilance, also see Klimmt et al. (2018). Additionally, we will also provide a constantly updated collection of papers/studies that have used the OSV in empirical research. Reference: Reinecke, L., Klimmt, C., Meier, A., Reich, S., Hefner, D., Knop-Huelss, K., Rieger, D., & Vorderer, P. (2018). Permanently online and permanently connected: Development and validation of the Online Vigilance Scale. PLoS ONE, 13(10): e0205384.
Project
The aim of this multi-study research program is to uncover predictors and boundary conditions for the experience of positive outcomes from passive social media use, specifically through the lens of social comparison theory. In a first step, we have surveyed Instagram users to investigate how social comparison intensity on Instagram is linked to two distinct types of emotional experiences, benign and malicious envy, as well as inspiration, a motivational state conducive to well-being (Meier & Schäfer, 2018). Currently, we are conducting experimental studies that test under which conditions the passive consumption of certain Instagram content (e.g., nature and travel imagery) is causally linked to upward comparison, benign and malicious envy, and inspiration.