Adrian Nigel Goring-Morris

Adrian Nigel Goring-Morris
Hebrew University of Jerusalem | HUJI · Institute of Archaeology

PhD

About

235
Publications
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Introduction
A. Nigel Goring-Morris currently works at the Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Nigel does research in Prehistoric Archaeology and Geomorphology. His current project is 'The initiation of sedentism and networking in the Terminal Pleistocene/Early Holocene of Cappadocia.'

Publications

Publications (235)
Chapter
Full-text available
The Levantine Epi-Palaeolithic (ca 23,000–9,650 cal. BC) is chronologically subdivided into Early, Middle and Late phases. Various paradigms (culture history, functional, etc.) have been proposed to explain the lithic variability present within and between the phases. We follow the culture history paradigm in believing that techno-typological varia...
Article
Full-text available
It is assumed that the Levantine inter-group networks that enabled the transfer of knowledge and innovation throughout the region are a distinguishing characteristic of the Near Eastern Neolithic. However, careful examination of the archaeological record indicates that long-distance networks among hunter-gatherer groups can be identified much prior...
Article
The development of agro-pastoral communities in the southern Levant is associated with a diversity of dietary and food practices, as indicated by the variability found between sites in the specific and relative representation of plant and animal species. The ground stone tools (GST), commonly employed to reduce a matter into smaller particles, are...
Article
Full-text available
Upper Palaeolithic (late) in the arid part of Southern Levant
Chapter
Volcanic Cappadocia is a unique region in Anatolia, having a diverse geology that has provided prehistoric communities with a variety of raw material sources, including obsidian, basalt and tufa, as well as water resources in the catchment area of the Melendiz River and its tributaries. However, data on the presence of local prehistoric communities...
Poster
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During the Neolithic agricultural revolution (NAR), which took place at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, human societies developed agrarian lifeways in the Fertile Crescent, coupled later with the early domestication of crops, coinciding with the transition from the Natufian to PPNA (Pre-Pottery Neolithic A) cultures in the Levant. The Fazael F...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Neolithic agricultural revolution (NAR) was manifested in the cultivation and domestication of wild plants in different regions of the “Fertile Crescent” around the 11th millennium BP. In spite of many years of research, the key drivers and the underlying conditions that made the Neolithic agricultural revolution possible are still debated. Pre...
Article
Shells found at the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B site of Yiftahel reflect various aspects of the cultic, social, and economic life at the site. Taxonomically, the assemblage is typical to sites in the Mediterranean climatic zone, dominated by Mediterranean bivalves with several local gastropods and a few specimens originating from the Red Sea. This comp...
Poster
Full-text available
The Neolithic agricultural revolution (NAR) is related to the early domestication of crop plants and the establishment of a sedentary-agrarian lifestyle in the Fertile Crescent during the early Holocene. Albeit many years of research, the key drivers of the Neolithic agricultural revolution and the underlying conditions that made it possible are st...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the nature of initial neolithisation indications during the terminal Pleistocene and earliest Holocene in the Southern Levant. This interval corresponds to a period of significant and geographically variable environmental changes in the region. Various lines of evidence are provided to demonstrate the long durée (~15 000 years)...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Lithic Technologies of the Epipaleolithic Hunter-Gatherers in the Negev, Israel: Implications from Refitting Studies. In the course of intensive systematic surveys and excavations in the western Negev Desert, Israel, dozens of Upper Paleolithic (ca. 46-23 ka cal BP) and Epipaleolithic (23-11.5 ka cal BP) sites were investigated. Traditional lit...
Article
The Negev Desert, an arid region of the southern Levant, was only occasionally suited for human occupation in prehistory. Archaeological sites are especially abundant in the Epipaleolithic periods, likely due to changes in the availability and distribution of water resources. We consider how hunter-gatherers adapted to this sometimes marginal regio...
Article
Full-text available
The edge angle of lithic tools is an important source of information on the intended function and the manufacturing technology of these artifacts. Yet, previously proposed procedures, both traditional and computer-based, can be flawed by ambiguity in the artifact positioning and in the choice of the points or surfaces defining the angle. A novel me...
Article
The emergence of the Upper Palaeolithic in Southwest Asia is considered a unique phenomenon in relation to other parts of the Old World. Besides the local circumstances that are particular to each region, this is the only region outside Africa with the clear presence of modern humans producing Middle Palaeolithic industries. Still, it seems that al...
Article
Full-text available
A riddle arises at the Epipaleolithic and Neolithic sites that dot the lower Jordan Valley. The area has no water resources yet it has long been a focus of inquiry into the transition from mobile hunter-gatherer to sedentary agriculture-based cultures. How then is there such clear evidence of life here, and particularly at such a critical moment in...
Chapter
Full-text available
Typo-technological and stylistic analysis of sickle blades from six Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (hereafter PPNB) assemblages in Galilee are described from the perspectives of chronology, function and posited agricultural developments. The assemblages derive from four sites, including Kfar HaHoresh (hereafter KHH) with a sequence spanning Early, Middle...
Article
Full-text available
Anatolia was home to some of the earliest farming communities. It has been long debated whether a migration of farming groups introduced agriculture to central Anatolia. Here, we report the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer and from seven Anatolian and Levantine early farmers. We find high genetic continuity (~...
Chapter
Full-text available
Excavations at Nahal Neqarot rock-shelter (NQR) in the central Negev were conducted with a view to investigate the initial interpretation upon discovery that the site contained both in situ Upper Palaeolithic and Epipalaeolithic components (Belfer-Cohen et al. 1991, 1993). The rock-shelter appeared to provide a unique opportunity to investigate con...
Article
Full-text available
Kayacan N., N. Goring-Morris, G. Duru, Z. F. Taşkiran, & B. Yucel. 2019. Aksaray Yüzey Araştirmasi 2016 ve 2017 Yılı Çalişmaları: İlk Yereleşik Topluluklar (Surveys in Aksaray 2016 and 2017: First Local Communities). Araştırma Sonuçları Toplantısı 36 195-206.
Chapter
Full-text available
The Social Archaeology of the Levant - edited by Assaf Yasur-Landau December 2018
Article
Full-text available
The site of Har Qeren 15 is a small tabular scraper quarry and campsite attributable to the Timnian culture complex, 6th–3rd millennium Cal BCE, perhaps in the earlier part of the span. Analyses of the lithic materials and their spatial distribution offer a picture of non-intensive production reflecting the production of tabular scrapers and ad hoc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anatolia was home to some of the earliest farming communities. It has been long debated whether a migration of farming groups introduced agriculture to central Anatolia. Here, we report the first genome-wide data from a 15,000 year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer and from seven Anatolian and Levantine early farmers. We find high genetic continuity be...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation given in the UISPP conference, Paris 2018 Session: XIII-2. Prehistoric Personal Adornment in Social and Economic Context. Clair Heckel and Solange Rigaud.
Article
Full-text available
At the end of the Pleistocene (25,000-15,000 BP), there is a shift to more arid conditions in the Negev and the Sinai corresponding to the Last Glacial Maximum. For the Nile Valley and the Levant, the lowering of the Mediterranean sea level, the expansion of the Sahara and the desiccation of some major eastern African lakes had important consequenc...
Chapter
Full-text available
There is a general consensus that the Ahmarian techno-complex represents an endemic Upper Palaeolithic entity that emerged in south-western Asia. Its entrenchment in the region is apparent over a long chronological span and a wide geographic range, as is most especially apparent in the Levant. Notwithstanding diachronic and synchronic variability,...
Chapter
With the advance of sedentism during the late Epipalaeolithic Natufian the sense of territoriality was amplified. Archaeological evidence testifies to an increase in group identity and processes of intensifying self-identity can be observed at the community level. Still, groups were bound to share a viable gene pool through different social mechani...
Article
Full-text available
Aurochs played a prominent role in mortuary and feasting practices during the Neolithic transition in south-west Asia, although evidence of these practices is diverse and regionally varied. This article considers a new concentration of aurochs bones from the southern Levantine Pre-Pottery Neolithic site of Kfar HaHoresh, situating it in a regional...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely agreed that a pivotal shift from wild animal hunting to herd animal management, at least of goats, began in the southern Levant by the Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (10,000–9,500 cal. BP) when evidence of ritual activities flourished in the region. As our knowledge of this critical change grows, sites that represent different f...
Data
MNE of fused and unfused Gazella elements used to calculate age stages based on bone fusion [65,66]. Total gazelle MNE by phase: EPPNB n = 67, MPPNB n = 116, LPPNB n = 216. (DOCX)
Data
MNE of fused and unfused Capra elements used to calculate age stages based on bone fusion [73]. (DOCX)
Data
MNE of fused and unfused Sus elements used to calculate age stages based on bone fusion [75]. (DOCX)