Adelaide Sibeaux

Adelaide Sibeaux
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Zoology

PhD

About

14
Publications
1,499
Reads
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66
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
62 Citations
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Additional affiliations
July 2020 - present
University of Oxford
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Fish Space Mapping
September 2015 - January 2019
Deakin University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Light, Pattern Geometry and Colour vision in Guppy Mate Choice -Behavioral ecology -Visual communication in a Mate choice context -Colour discrimination, Receptor Noise Limited Model This PhD project aimed to combine information about colour discrimination with mate choice behavioural experiments, bringing new insights into the evolution of colour patterns in sexual selection.
April 2015 - July 2015
Deakin University
Position
  • Research Assistant_volunteer

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Neurophysiological advances have given us exciting insights into the systems responsible for spatial mapping in mammals. However, we are still lacking information on the evolution of these systems and whether the underlying mechanisms identified are universal across phyla, or specific to the species studied. Here we address these questions by explo...
Preprint
Neurophysiological advances have given us exciting insights into the systems responsible for spatial mapping in mammals. However, we are still lacking information on the evolution of these systems and whether the underlying mechanisms identified are universal across phyla, or specific to the species studied. Here we address these questions by explo...
Article
The presence of various combinations of adjacent colors within polymorphic species’ color pattern could have a major impact on mate choice. We studied the role of pattern geometry in predicting mate choice in guppies using boundary strength analysis (BSA). BSA estimates the visual contrast intensity between two adjacent color patches (ΔS) weighted...
Article
Colour signals are often made up of a number of colour patches. The position of these patches within a pattern has the potential to influence signal conspicuousness, especially if viewers attend to local rather than global aspects of the colour pattern. If local contrast is important, then signal efficacy should be highest when highly contrasting p...
Article
Visual pigments can vary across the retina in many vertebrates, but the behavioural consequences of this retinal heterogeneity are unknown. Guppies (Poecilia reticulata) vary dorsoventrally in visual pigments and forage both on the ground and at the water surface, exposing different retinal regions to two very different visual environments. We test...
Thesis
This PhD project aimed to combine information about colour discrimination with mate choice behavioural experiments, bringing new insights into the evolution of colour patterns in sexual selection.
Article
Full-text available
Physiological parameters provide indicators to evaluate how organisms respond to conservation actions. For example, individuals translocated during reinforcement programmes may not adapt to their novel host environment and may exhibit elevated chronic levels of stress hormones and/or decreasing body condition. Conversely, successful conservation ac...
Article
Full-text available
Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and t...
Conference Paper
All tortoise species face strong decline, especially in Mediterranean areas. The Hermann tortoise (Testudo hermanni) notably is critically endangered in Western Europe. Small patchy populations subsist in Southeast France; they are threatened by habitat loss. In the course of a conservation Life+ Program (2010-2014), we evaluated the effect of habi...
Presentation
All tortoise species face strong decline, especially in Mediterranean areas. The Hermann tortoise (Testudo hermanni) notably is critically endangered in Western Europe. In France, this species subsist in the South Est where small patchy populations are particularly vulnerable due to habitat destruction mainly. Throughout a conservation Life+ Progra...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Dispersal, i.e. individuals’ movement between breeding sites, is a key process for metapopulation dynamics and gene flow. Differences in phenotypic and life-history traits between dispersing and philopatric (i.e. non-dispersing) individuals, also called dispersal syndromes, have been put forward as an important determinant of the success of dispersal strategies. However, the mechanisms underlying such syndromes remain poorly known in most species. In particular, the relative role of environmental (external) and physiological (internal) constraints in shaping differences between dispersing and philopatric individuals deserves more attention. This project aims at clarifying the impact of environmental variation and oxidative constraints, linked to the production of reactive oxygen species during mitochondrial respiration, on phenotypes associated to dispersal in a migratory passerine bird, the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis.
Project
Testing age-related changes in physiological and behavioural traits
Project
In many species, individuals use complex colour patterns to find food, avoid predation, attract mates and compete for resources. Colour pattern phenotypes can evolve rapidly. Indeed the evolution of this multicomponent trait is driven by natural and sexual selection. Most non-human species possess visual systems which are usually very different than the human one. To access information about colour pattern preferences during mate choice, we need to fully understand animals’ visual systems. During my PhD I will investigate colour perception and discrimination in a sexually dimorphic species, in which colour is a determinant factor for mate choice: the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). My first aim is to determine the threshold of discrimination of colours in hue (i.e. category of colour) and saturation (i.e. spectral purity), using Just Noticeable Difference (JND) calculations. Subsequently, I wish to investigate the role of highly contrasting adjacent colours (in JND) in mate choice, and attempt to predict the best colour combinations which should evolve under different environmental conditions. My hypotheses are (1) the relationship between physical and perceived variation of colour could be either linear or a series incremental thresholds (2) selective pressures should lead to greater contrast with respect to patches of colour which are adjacent to each other, but not necessarily those which are further apart in the signaller’s body.