Addisu Mekonnen

Addisu Mekonnen
The University of Calgary | HBI · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

59
Publications
18,707
Reads
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527
Citations
Citations since 2017
51 Research Items
481 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
Introduction
Addisu Mekonnen is a wildlife ecologist, evolutionary biologist, and conservation biologist with a broad range of interests including wildlife ecology and management, conservation biology, animal behavior, population/evolutionary genetics, and forest ecology. Addisu is currently running his long-term Bale Monkey - Bamboo Research Project as well as other wildlife projects in Ethiopia.
Additional affiliations
March 2009 - present
Addis Ababa University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (59)
Article
Full-text available
Primates inhabiting human-modified landscapes often exploit matrix habitat to supplement their diet with cultivated foods, at times resulting in economic losses and conflict with local people. Understanding human-nonhuman primate interactions and the attitudes and perceptions of local people towards crop feeding species are crucial to designing eff...
Article
Open access to the scholarly literature is crucial for African academics but, without urgent action, the move from paywall to pay-to-publish wall will continue to disenfranchise researchers. In an unpublished study, we looked at the 40 journals with the highest impact factors in our field (ecology), and found that the average article-processing c...
Article
Full-text available
Although selecting advantageous sleeping sites is crucial for nonhuman primates, the extent to which different factors contribute to their selection remains largely unknown for many species. We investigated hypotheses relating to predator avoidance, food access, and thermoregulation to explain the sleeping behavior of Bale monkeys ( Chlorocebus dja...
Article
Forest loss and degradation are the most significant threats to terrestrial biodiversity in the tropics. Promoting flagship or umbrella species is a strategy that can be used to conserve intact forests and restore degraded ecosystems, conserve biodiversity, and achieve sustainable development goals. The Bale monkey (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis) is an...
Article
Full-text available
With open-access publishing authors often pay an article processing charge and subsequently their article is freely available online. These charges are beyond the reach of most African academics. Thus, the trend towards open-access publishing will shift the business model from a pay-wall model, where access to literature is limited, to a pay-to-pub...
Article
Full-text available
Ethiopia is home to one of the richest and most unique assemblages of fauna and flora on the African continent. Contained within its borders are two major centers of endemism, the mesic Roof of Africa (also known as the Ethiopian Highlands) and the arid Horn of Africa, resulting from the country's varied topography and consequent geographic isolati...
Article
Currently, the depletion of natural resources and contamination of the surrounding environment demand a paradigm shift to resource recycling and reuse. In this regard, phosphorus (P) is a model nutrient that possesses the negative traits of depletion (will be exhausted in the next 100 years) and environmental degradation (causes eutrophication and...
Article
Full-text available
Many of the world’s most biodiverse regions are found in the poorest and second most populous continent of Africa; a continent facing exceptional challenges. Africa is projected to quadruple its population by 2100 and experience increasingly severe climate change and environmental conflict—all of which will ravage biodiversity. Here we assess conse...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Chlorocebus djamdjamensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2022: e.T4240A205910680. Available at: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/4240/205910680
Technical Report
Full-text available
Chlorocebus djamdjamensis ssp. harennaensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2022: e.T205910110A205910458. Available at: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/205910110/205910458
Technical Report
Full-text available
Chlorocebus djamdjamensis ssp. djamdjamensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2022: e.T205910256A205910259. Available at: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/205910256/205910259
Article
Full-text available
Given the current rate of habitat degradation and loss in the tropics, data on primate population densities and habitat use are indispensable for assessing conservation status and designing feasible management plans for primates. The Omo River guereza (Colobus guereza guereza) is a subspecies of the eastern black-and-white colobus monkey endemic to...
Preprint
With open-access publishing authors pay an article processing charge and subsequently their article is freely available online. These charges are beyond the reach of most African academics. Thus, the trend towards open access publishing will shift the business model from a pay-wall model, where access to literature is limited, to a pay-to-publish o...
Article
Objectives Although fermented food use is ubiquitous in humans, the ecological and evolutionary factors contributing to its emergence are unclear. Here we investigated the ecological contexts surrounding the consumption of fruits in the late stages of fermentation by wild primates to provide insight into its adaptive function. We hypothesized that...
Article
Objectives Although fermented food use is ubiquitous in humans, the ecological and evolutionary factors contributing to its emergence are unclear. Here we investigated the ecological contexts surrounding the consumption of fruits in the late stages of fermentation by wild primates to provide insight into its adaptive function. We hypothesized that...
Article
Full-text available
The subspecific taxonomy and distribution of geladas (Theropithecus gelada Rüppell, 1835) remains uncertain. Recent molecular studies based on mitochondrial sequence data revealed a geographically structured, three‐deme population, suggesting that there are three evolutionary units of geladas. However, mitochondrial distributions do not always reco...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable data on the distribution and threats facing primate species are crucial to identifying priority sites for conservation and designing effective management plans. Boutourlini’s blue monkey (Cercopithecus mitis boutourlinii) is a little-known arboreal primate endemic to the forests of western Ethiopia. This subspecies is categorized as Vulner...
Article
Full-text available
To cope with climate change and population growth, the continent urgently needs more home-grown researchers, argue Anagaw Atickem, Nils Chr. Stenseth and colleagues. To cope with climate change and population growth, the continent urgently needs more home-grown researchers, argue Anagaw Atickem, Nils Chr. Stenseth and colleagues. Students work at a...
Article
Full-text available
The large-bodied, terrestrial primates in the tribe Papionini are among the most intensely studied animals in the world, yet for some members of this tribe we know comparatively little about their evolutionary history and phylogeography. Geladas (Theropithecus gelada Rüppell, 1835), endemic primates of the Ethiopian highlands, are largely unstudied...
Data
ML tree showing phylogenetic relationships among gelada and baboon haplotypes. Numbers at nodes refer to bootstrap values in %. (PDF)
Data
Bayesian tree showing phylogenetic relationships among gelada and baboon haplotypes. Numbers at nodes refer to posterior probabilities. (PDF)
Data
Best-fit models for protein-coding and non-protein-coding partitions for various gelada populations as obtained from jModeltest for the Bayesian skyline plots (BSPs). (PDF)
Data
Divergence age estimates (Ma) and respective 95% Highest Posterior Density (HPD) intervals. (PDF)
Data
Geographic provenance of gelada samples (decimal degrees), their mtDNA haplotypes (h-type), haplogroups (h-group) and GenBank Accession Numbers. * Sample from northern range but with central haplotype. (PDF)
Data
Selection for the “best” population model. (PDF)
Data
Results of the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) analyses. (PDF)
Data
Nguyen N, Fashing PJ, Burke RJ. Determining the conservation status of gelada monkeys: Distribution, abundance and phylogenetic relationships of Theropithecus gelada across the Ethiopian Highlands. 2016; Unpubl. Final report to Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Species with a restricted geographic distribution, and highly specialized habitat and dietary requirements, are particularly vulnerable to extinction. The Bale monkey (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis) is a little-known arboreal, bamboo-specialist primate endemic to the southern Ethiopian Highlands. While most Bale monkeys inhabit montane forests dominate...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of the effects of habitat fragmentation and degradation on primate positional behavior, strata use, and substrate utilization offer valuable insights into the behavioral and ecological flexibility of primates whose habitats have undergone extensive anthropogenic disturbance. In this study, we evaluated how positional behavior, strata use, a...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The gelada monkey (Theropithecus gelada), endemic to the Ethiopian highlands, is the only graminivorous primate, i.e., it feeds mainly on grasses and sedges. In spite of known dental, manual, and locomotor adaptations, the intestinal anatomy of geladas is similar to that of other primates. We currently lack a clear understanding of the...
Thesis
Habitat fragmentation and degradation are the major threats to nonhuman primates in the tropics leaving many populations in isolated fragments in human-dominated landscapes. Thus, understanding the extent of the impacts of habitat fragmentation and degradation on a particular species is essential to designing species-based management strategies. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the basic natural history of threatened primate taxa is crucial to developing and implementing successful conservation strategies for them. Data on feeding ecology and activity patterns are particularly important for identifying the strategies through which primates invest time and foraging effort towards survival and reproduction at...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Understanding the effects of habitat modification on the feeding strategies of threatened species is essential to designing effective conservation management plans. Bale monkeys (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis) are endemic to the rapidly shrinking montane forests of the southern Ethiopian Highlands. Most populations inhabit continuous bambo...
Article
Full-text available
Human activities can cause habitat degradation that may alter the types and quality of available food resources and thus influence the microbiomes of wild animal populations. Furthermore, seasonal shifts in food availability may cause adaptive responses in the gut microbiome to meet the need for different metabolic capabilities. Here, we demonstrat...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the extent to which primates in forest fragments can adjust behaviorally and ecologically to changes caused by deforestation is essential to designing conservation management plans. During a 12-month period, we studied the effects of habitat loss and degradation on the Ethiopian endemic, bamboo specialist, Bale monkey (Chlorocebus dja...
Article
Full-text available
Comparisons of the behavior and ecology of primates living in intact and fragmented forest are critical to the development of conservation strategies for the many primate taxa threatened by habitat loss. From July 2009 to April 2010, we investigated the habitat use, ranging behavior, and diet of two groups of Boutourlini’s blue monkeys (Cercopithec...
Article
Full-text available
Until recently, the Bale monkey (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis), an arboreal primate endemic to the southern Ethiopian highlands, remained virtually unstudied, and its distribution pattern inadequately documented. To broaden our knowledge of the species' distribution and abundance, we carried out interviews with local people and total count surveys for...
Article
Full-text available
The Bale monkey Chlorocebus djamdjamensis is a little-known primate endemic to the south-eastern highlands of Ethiopia. From August 2007 to May 2008 we surveyed to determine the species' habitat preferences and population size in the Odobullu Forest and its range across the Bale Mountains. In Odobullu Forest a total of 136 transects of 1.8–3.0 km w...
Article
Full-text available
Bale monkeys (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis) are little-known primates endemic to the forests of the Bale Massif and Hagere Selam regions of Ethiopia. From August 2007 to May 2008, we conducted the first ever study of the species’ behavior and ecology, focusing in particular on its diet, activity patterns, and ranging ecology in the Odobullu Forest. We...

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