Addison D Kemp

Addison D Kemp
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Department of Anthropology

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19
Publications
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286
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Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Scientific study of lemurs, a group of primates found only on Madagascar, is crucial for understanding primate evolution. Unfortunately, lemurs are among the most endangered animals in the world, so there is a strong impetus to maximize as much scientific data as possible from available physical specimens. MicroCT scanning efforts at Duke Universit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Scientific study of lemurs, a group of primates found only on Madagascar, is crucial for understanding primate evolution. Unfortunately, lemurs are among the most endangered animals in the world, so there is a strong impetus to maximize as much scientific data as possible from available physical specimens. MicroCT scanning efforts at Duke Universit...
Article
Objectives We tested whether patterns of intraspecific variation in catarrhine vertebral shape are consistent with developmental or functional predictions. Intraspecific variation was compared across column regions, morphological features, and species. Transitional regions and later ossifying morphological features were predicted to exhibit increas...
Article
As the smallest living primate, the mouse lemur is a suitable model for reconstructing the locomotor mechanisms by which primate ancestors might have responded to the challenges of an arboreal environment. In this study, we tested the effects of substrate diameter and orientation on quadrupedal gait kinematics in mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus)....
Article
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ABSTRACT-Living mammals are distinguished from other extant tetrapods by adaptations for improved senses of hearing, touch, and smell. These adaptations, and concomitant reductions in visual anatomy, evolved during the Mesozoic in the mammalian and therian stem lineages. Here, we present a comparative study of the sensory anatomy of the Late Cretac...
Article
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Previously known only from isolated teeth and lower jaw fragments recovered from the Cretaceous and Palaeogene of the Southern Hemisphere, the Gondwanatheria constitute the most poorly known of all major mammaliaform radiations. Here we report the discovery of the first skull material of a gondwanatherian, a complete and well-preserved cranium from...
Article
The semicircular canals of the inner ear detect head rotations and trigger compensatory movements that stabilize gaze and help maintain visual fixation. Mammals with large eyes and high visual acuity require precise gaze stabilization mechanisms because they experience diminished visual functionality at low thresholds of uncompensated motion. Becau...
Article
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Studies of host-parasite interactions have the potential to provide insights into the ecology of both organisms involved. We monitored the movement of sucking lice (Lemurpediculus verruculosus), parasites that require direct host-host contact to be transferred, in their host population of wild mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus). These lemurs live in t...
Data
Figure S3. Social network map of mouse lemurs based on trapping data and louse exchanges. This figure represents the social contacts based on trapping data alone (black dashed line), based on louse transfers (dotted blue line), and contacts that occurred based on both trapping data and louse exchange data (solid purple line). 28 contacts were predi...
Data
Figure S1. Infestation of L. verruculosus on the testes of a wild brown mouse lemur. 1a. Immediately preceding the breeding season, lice began to appear on the testes. 1b. All stages of the L. verruculosus life cycle are observed on the testes. All three nymphal instars and both sexes of the adult stage can be seen. Lemur testes had the greatest lo...
Data
Figure S2. Frequency of capture suggests stereotyped trap locales for individual lemurs. 2a. Plotting the number of times an animal was captured (x-axis) against the total number of different trap locales in which an individual was caught shows that most animals were trapped at up to 4 trap locales. However, there were four individuals (in the elli...
Data
Full-text available
Figure S4. Individuals with a larger number of social connections calculated using trapping data also have a larger number of these same connections based on louse transfers (left, rs = 0.614, p = 0.027). In addition, louse transfer based calculations reveal additional contacts that could not have been predicted based on trapping data, and hence th...
Data
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Table S1. Table showing eigenvector centralities calculated using social network analysis software.
Data
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Figure S5. Histogram of percentage of marked and total lice donated. In this figure the dark grey bars represent the percentage of lice donated out of the total number of lice found on the body. The light grey bars represent the percentage of lice donated out of the total number of marked lice from that individual. When including the total number o...
Data
Full-text available
Figure S6. Testes of a brown mouse lemur during the breeding season. This image demonstrates the seasonal testicular growth seen in male mouse lemurs during the breeding season. The dotted line encircles the testicles.
Data
Full-text available
Text S1. Additional text.
Data
Table S2. Table showing the number of donated lice out of the total number of marked lice, and the total number of lice found on the body.
Data
Table S3. Table representing the maximum distances lemurs travelled according to trapping data along with the maximum distances lemurs travelled according to the movement of their lice.

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