Adam Young

Adam Young
Northern Arizona University | NAU · School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems

About

18
Publications
3,429
Reads
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867
Citations
Education
June 2014 - May 2016
University of Idaho
Field of study
  • Statistical Science
June 2011 - May 2018
University of Idaho
Field of study
  • Natural Resources
August 2007 - May 2011

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Evapotranspiration (ET) is a significant ecosystem flux, governing the partitioning of energy at the land surface. Understanding the seasonal pattern and magnitude of ET is critical for anticipating a range of ecosystem impacts, including drought, heat‐wave events, and plant mortality. In this study, we identified the relative controls of seasonal...
Article
Surface roughness – a key control on land-atmosphere exchanges of heat and momentum – differs between dormant and growing seasons. However, how surface roughness shifts seasonally at fine time scales (e.g., days) in response to changing canopy conditions is not well understood. This study: (1) explores how aerodynamic resistance changes seasonally;...
Article
Full-text available
Evergreen conifer forests are the most prevalent land cover type in North America. Seasonal changes in the color of evergreen forest canopies have been documented with near‐surface remote sensing, but the physiological mechanisms underlying these changes, and the implications for photosynthetic uptake, have not been fully elucidated. Here, we integ...
Article
Full-text available
Projected changes in temperature and precipitation are expected to influence spring and autumn vegetation phenology and hence the length of the growing season in many ecosystems. However, the sensitivity of green‐up and senescence to climate remains uncertain. We analyzed 488 site years of canopy greenness measurements from deciduous forest broadle...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring vegetation phenology is critical for quantifying climate change impacts on ecosystems. We present an extensive dataset of 1783 site-years of phenological data derived from PhenoCam network imagery from 393 digital cameras, situated from tropics to tundra across a wide range of plant functional types, biomes, and climates. Most cameras ar...
Article
Aim Ecological properties governed by threshold relationships can exhibit heightened sensitivity to climate, creating an inherent source of uncertainty when anticipating future change. We investigated the impact of threshold relationships on our ability to project ecological change outside the observational record (e.g., the 21st century), using th...
Article
Boreal forests and arctic tundra cover 33% of global land area and store an estimated 50% of total soil carbon. Because wildfire is a key driver of terrestrial carbon cycling, increasing fire activity in these ecosystems would likely have global implications. To anticipate potential spatiotemporal variability in fire-regime shifts, we modeled the s...
Poster
Full-text available
Young, A. M., P. E. Higuera, J. Abatzoglou, P. A. Duffy, and F. S. Hu. 2016. Predicting fire-regime responses to climate change over the past millennium: Implications of paleodata- model comparisons for future projections of fire activity. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Poster
Full-text available
Young, A. M., L. Boschetti, P. Duffy, F. S. Hu, and P. E. Higuera. 2015. Disentangling modern fire-climate-vegetation relationships across the boreal forest biome. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA.
Article
Anthropogenic climate change may result in novel disturbances to Arctic tundra ecosystems. Understanding the natural variability of tundra-fire regimes and their linkages to climate is essential in evaluating whether tundra burning has increased in recent years. Historical observations and charcoal records from lake sediments reveal a wide range of...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Understanding how climate and vegetation influence fire regimes is crucial for interpreting ecological feedbacks and predicting future changes. Such knowledge is particularly relevant in boreal forest and tundra ecosystems, where increased fire activity could release stored soil carbon and accelerate climatic warming....
Conference Paper
Understanding the vulnerability of fire regimes to 21st-century climatic change is crucial for anticipating future ecosystem feedbacks and interactions, particularly in carbon-rich boreal forest and tundra ecosystems. We quantified multi-decadal scale fire regime controls using 2-km resolution fire (1950-2009), climate (1950-2009), topographical, a...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Climate plays a large role in determining the distribution of vegetation and fire occurrence in mountainous regions in the western U.S. Climate metrics that synthesize temperature and precipitation are important predictors of vegetation type and productivity, and may be more useful than temperature and precipitation al...
Article
Digital repeat photography has the potential to become an important long-term data source for phenological research given its advantages in terms of logistics, continuity, consistency and objectivity over traditional assessments of vegetation status by human observers. Red-green-blue (RGB) color channel information from digital images can be separa...
Article
Tundra fires have important ecological impacts through interactions with vegetation, wildlife, permafrost, and carbon cycling. Despite this importance, little is known about the biological and physical controls of tundra burning and links to climate and vegetation change. We used observational and paleoecological data from tundra ecosystems in Alas...

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