Adam Nordsvan

Adam Nordsvan
The University of Hong Kong | HKU · Department of Earth Sciences

PhD

About

27
Publications
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Introduction
Adam Nordsvan currently works at the Department of Applied Geology, Curtin University. Adam does research in geology, sedimentology and supercontinent reconstructions. Their current project is 'NE Australia in the supercontinent Nuna.'

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
The geodynamic regimes that operated during the Mesoproterozoic amalgamation of the first supercontinent on Earth, Nuna, remain poorly understood. Palaeogeographic Nuna reconstructions indicate that NE Australia and NW Laurentia were adjacent at its core—the ca. 1600 Ma collision between the Australian upper-plate (i.e., the Mount Isa Inlier) and t...
Article
The tectonic regimes that drove the 1560–1490 Ma granitic magmatism c. 50 m.yr. after the final assembly of the Proterozoic supercontinent Nuna in NE Australia remain elusive. Collision between NE Australia (Mount Isa Inlier—MTI) and NW Laurentia (Georgetown Inlier—GTI) occurred at c. 1600 Ma and was associated with a west-dipping subduction zone,...
Article
Full-text available
The ca. 717 Ma low-latitude Sturtian “snowball Earth” glaciation lasted ∼56 Myr. However, sedimentological evidence for transient, open ocean conditions during the glaciation appears to contradict the concept of a global deep freeze. We demonstrate multiple lines of geologic evidence from five continents for a temporary, localized sea-ice retreat d...
Article
Full-text available
The snowball Earth hypothesis—that a runaway ice-albedo feedback can cause global glaciation—seeks to explain low-latitude glacial deposits, as well as geological anomalies including the re-emergence of banded iron formation and “cap” carbonates. One of the most significant challenges to snowball Earth has been sedimentological cyclicity that has b...
Article
Full-text available
A lack of precise age constraints for Neoproterozoic strata in the northwestern United States (Washington State), including the Buffalo Hump Formation (BHF), has resulted in conflicting interpretations of Rodinia amalgamation and breakup processes. Previous detrital zircon (DZ) studies identified a youngest ca. 1.1 Ga DZ age population in the BHF,...
Chapter
The current shape of Australia is largely an artifact of the previous supercontinent, Pangea. The Great Australian Bight to the south was shaped by Australia and Antarctica breaking apart roughly 90 million years ago, and New Zealand drifting away about 10 million years later, forming the eastern coast of the continent. Nevertheless, Australia has...
Article
Full-text available
The ca. 1.60 Ga Isan Orogeny in NE Australia has been ascribed to the collision of Australia and Laurentia (North America), marking the final assembly of the Proterozoic supercontinent Nuna. However, details regarding the tectonic evolution of the orogen remains poorly constrained. To investigate the late- to post-orogenic thermal evolution and exh...
Article
Full-text available
Accessory mineral thermometry and thermodynamic modelling are fundamental tools for constraining petrogenetic models of granite magmatism. U-Pb geochronology on zircon and monazite from S-type granites emplaced within a semi-continuous, whole-crust section in the Georgetown Inlier (GTI), NE Australia, indicates synchronous crystallisation at 1550 M...
Article
Full-text available
Mineralization along continental suture zones is facilitated through the frequent presence of pathways from fertile mantle source regions to crustal repositories. Due to their inherent rheological weakness, these suture zones are often concealed, which hinders surface-based observations. Here, we use zircon U-Pb and sericite ⁴⁰Ar/³⁹Ar dating, and w...
Article
Full-text available
The poly‐deformed Georgetown Inlier (GTI) in NE Australia has recently been suggested to record a 1.60 Ga orogenic event related to final Nuna assembly. However, the structural evolution of the inlier has remained poorly constrained at the regional scale, and major tectono‐thermal events occurred at circa 1.55 Ga. The GTI is the type region for con...
Article
Full-text available
The Australia-Laurentia connection in the Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Nuna is thought to have initiated by ca. 1.6 Ga when both continents were locked in a proto-SWEAT (southwestern U.S.–East Antarctic) configuration. However, the longevity of that configuration is poorly constrained. Here, we present a new high-quality paleo...
Article
The final assembly of the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Nuna was marked by the collision of Laurentia and Australia at 1.60 Ga, which is recorded in the Georgetown Inlier of NE Australia. Here we decipher the metamorphic evolution of this final Nuna collisional event using petrostructural analysis, major and trace element compositions of key miner...
Article
Multidimensional scaling (MDS) has become an important tool in detrital zircon geochronology for discriminating and comparing multiple samples, especially where large datasets are concerned. However, the non-parametrical test statistics used in MDS (e.g., Kolmogorov–Smirnov [K-S] or Kuiper) to calculate differences between detrital zircon samples a...
Article
Full-text available
[1] While cap dolostones are integral to the provocative Snowball Earth hypothesis, the current depositional model does not account for multiple geological observations. Here we propose a model that rationalises paleomagnetic, sequence‐stratigraphic and sedimentological data and supports rapid deglaciation with protracted cap dolostone precipitatio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The final assembly of the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Nuna was marked by the collision of Laurentia (North America) and Australia between c. 1.6 and 1.53 Ga. The final suture of Nuna has been identified in NE Australia, where the Proterozoic Georgetown Inlier represents the accreted leading edge of Laurentia. However, the structural and metamorp...
Article
Full-text available
Estimated at ~58 Myr in duration, the Sturtian snowball Earth (ca. 717‐659 Ma) is one of the longest‐known glaciations in Earth history. Surprisingly few uncontroversial lines of evidence for glacial incisions associated with such a protracted event exist. We report here multiple lines of geologic field evidence for deep but variable glacial erosio...
Article
We present new paleo- and rock magnetic results from the ca. 1792 Ma Hart Dolerite sills that intrude the strata of the Kimberley craton, Western Australia. From 24 sites sampled, 23 are directionally clustered and the site mean directions were used to calculate a grand mean direction. Ten of the 23 sites have 95% confidence intervals (α95) less th...
Article
The precise timing and nature of the final assembly of the supercontinent Nuna, marked by the collision of proto-Australia and Laurentia (North America) between 1.65 and 1.50 Ga, has remained elusive. The final Nuna suture has been speculated to be concealed in northeastern Australia, but univocal evidence for crustal thickening across the suture z...
Article
A central prediction of the Snowball Earth hypothesis is that glacial onset should be synchronous at low latitudes, and its termination should be rapid and synchronous globally. Synchronous onset of the Sturtian (ca. 716 to ca. 660 Ma) has been robustly shown on multiple continents through the application of high precision U-Pb zircon dating. Succe...
Article
This investigation presents an outcrop-based integrated study of internal division analysis and statistical treatment of turbidite bed thickness applied to a Carboniferous deep-water channel-levee complex in the Myall Trough, southeast Australia. Turbidite beds of the studied succession are characterized by a range of sedimentary structures grouped...
Article
The Georgetown Inlier of northeast Australia provides evidence of critical links between Australia and Laurentia during the late Paleoproterozoic and the early Mesoproterozoic. Detrital zircon age spectra from sedimentary strata within the inlier show two distinct changes in sedimentary provenance: (1) the lowermost units (depositional age ca. 1700...
Article
Full-text available
This investigation presents an outcrop-based integrated study of sedimentological analysis and sequence stratigraphy applied to the Lower Permian sedimentary succession in the southern Sydney Basin, Australia. This succession accumulated in several depositional environments and sub-environments that range from non-marine (fluvial) to marine (outer...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Myall Trough represent the most eastern margin of the Tamworth Belt, which is one of two major divisions of the New England Fold Belt (NEFB) (Leitch 1974). The NEFB symbolises a Palaeozoic north south striking west dipping subduction complex. The Tamworth Belt is situated on the western divide of the NEFB and is thought to be an arc-flank/fore-arc...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The Proterozoic supercontinent Nuna remains matter of fundamental controversies. The palaeogeographical configuration of Nuna and the timing of its assembly remain widely questioned, especially because of the uncertainty on palaeomagnetic data beyond 1000 Ma. Recent Palaeo- to Mesoproterozoic tectonic models for Nuna, based on current palaeomagnetic and geological information (i.e., geochronology, geochemistry and basin analysis), have suggested connections between NE Australia, NW Laurentia and possibly W Siberia. Decoding the Proterozoic tectonic history of NE Australia is therefore critical for testing the proposed links in terms of the assembly and break-up history of Nuna. This project aims to unravel the assembly of the eastern part of the North Australian Craton. To identify the terranes that, between 2.0 and 1.5 Ga, collided to the Archean core of the craton, the project will be axed along a ~E–W composite corridor across northern Queensland. Crustal-scale structural discontinuities imaged on seismic lines across NE Australia, and interpreted as possible Proterozoic sutures, are not exposed at the Earth’s surface, so that their tectonic interpretation must rely on indirect records of possible orogenic events. The project therefore encompasses several field-based studies in structural geology, igneous and metamorphic petrology, geochronology and thermochronology, geochemistry, palaeomagnetism, and sedimentology. Such a multi-disciplinary approach shall allow obtaining a comprehensive picture of the evolution of NE Australia and discussing possible palaeotectonic and palaeogeographic connections with other Proterozoic provinces from Australia and beyond.