Adam Miodowski

Adam Miodowski
University of Bialystok · Faculty of History & International Relations

Doctor of Science (dr hab.)

About

19
Publications
2,296
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19
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
19 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
The mobilization for the Russian army ordered in July 1914 in the Kingdom of Poland and the “Manifesto to the Poles” proclaimed almost simultaneously by the Commander-in-Chief evoked several diverse (opposing) reactions. However, these divisions did not run, as one might expect for historical reasons, between different ethnic groups or social strat...
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The Social and Civic Women's League has acted in Communist Poland in the years 1945-1949. Its first official press release, which was "Praca Kobiet", started its publication only in 1946. Periodical publishing had been issued by Warsaw Regional Board of the association. The national magazine "Nasza Praca", an organ of the General Board, has been re...
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During the Great War, more than two million prisoners from the armies of the Central Powers found themselves in Russian captivity. Most of those soldiers were captured between 1914 and 1916. Apart from the wounded and those taken prisoner in combat, the group of POWs also included deserters and those who had consciously decided to surrender to the...
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The involvement of the Fourth Estate in the reconstruction of the political scene between 2002 and 2005 revealed more than just the weakness of those who should have been keeping an eye on politicians. Above all, it was crucial evidence of the imperfection of democracy in Poland. Many considered democracy to have a purely declarative and facade nat...
Article
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In Poland, there is a noticeable deficit of knowledge about the mass Soviet women’s press. After all, it for decades shaped the views and attitudes of millions of Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian women and other residents of the Soviet Union. Such periodicals as “Robotnica”, “Włościanka”, “Kobieta Sowiecka”, being at the central level a part of a pow...
Article
During the Great War, more than 2 million prisoners from the armies of the Central Powers found themselves in Russian captivity. Most of those soldiers were captured between 1914 and 1916. Apart from the wounded and those taken prisoner in combat, the group of POWs also included deserters and those who had consciously decided to surrender to the Ru...
Article
Full-text available
In December 1948, at the unification congress of the Polish Workers’ Party and the Polish Socialist Party, the Polish United Workers’ Party was formed. Thus, transplanted to Poland from July 1944, Stalinism entered the phase of its unfettered development. It reached the apogee of its development in the mid-1950s, and it was only October 1956 that c...
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Forming in the first months after the February Revolution, sections of the extremely leftist branch of the Polish Socialist Party, the Polish Socialist Party – Left and the Social Democracy of the Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania almost immediately made contact with Polish soldiers dispersed in the Russian Army, as well as serving in the Polish Rifl...
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Aleksandra Domontowicz urodziła się 31 marca 1872 r. w Peters-burgu. W 1893 r. w wieku 21 lat wyszła za mąż za Michała Kołłontaja. Dzięki mężowi poznała rewolucyjną myśl Karola Marksa, Fryderyka Engelsa i Jerzego Plechanowa. Po rozstaniu z mężem A. Kołłontaj wyjechała w 1898 r. do Szwajcarii, gdzie podjęła studia ekonomiczne. Podczas pobytu w zacho...
Article
Full-text available
Austro-Hungarian POWs in Russian captivity during the pre-revolutionary period (August 1914 – February 1917) During the Great War between 2.2 and 2.3 mill. POWs from the Central Powers were taken to Russian captivity. Most of them were citizens of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. They became POWs mostly during the years 1914-1916. Apart from those cap...

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