Adam Jeziorski

Adam Jeziorski
Queen's University | QueensU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

44
Publications
7,963
Reads
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1,039
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2011 - present
Queen's University
Position
  • Fellow
July 2005 - August 2006
Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Dorset, Canada
Position
  • Technician
Education
September 2006 - March 2011
Queen's University
Field of study
  • Biology
January 2003 - February 2005
York University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 1996 - April 2001
University of Waterloo
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Full-text available
Calcium concentrations are now commonly declining in softwater boreal lakes. Although the mechanisms leading to these declines are generally well known, the consequences for the aquatic biota have not yet been reported. By examining crustacean zooplankton remains preserved in lake sediment cores, we document near extirpations of calcium-rich Daphni...
Article
Full-text available
The jellification of north temperate lakes. Calcium (Ca) concentrations are decreasing in softwater lakes across eastern North America and western Europe. Using long-term contemporary and palaeo-environmental field data, we show that this is precipitating a dramatic change in Canadian lakes: the replacement of previously dominant pelagic herbivores...
Article
Full-text available
Calcium (Ca) is a major component of the crustacean zooplankton carapace. As crustacean zooplankton obtain most of their Ca from lake water, taxa with high Ca demands may be negatively affected if environmental Ca concentrations fall below thresholds necessary for adequate Ca uptake rates. Currently, Ca concentrations are falling in many soft-water...
Article
Full-text available
The “Ring of Fire” in the Far North of Ontario (50–57° N, 79–94° W) is a region of growing economic and environmental interest due to recent mineral discoveries and the potential for resource development. Due to the remote location of the region, little baseline ecological information is available to distinguish any environmental impacts of mine de...
Chapter
AnthropogenicClimateclimate changeClimate change and the recent increase ofSaharan dustSaharan dust depositionSaharan dust depositionare potentially affectingSierra NevadaSierra NevadaAlpine lakesalpine lakesLakes. In this chapter, we summarize the results of paleolimnological research conducted to track recent environmental and ecological changes...
Article
Anthropogenic stressors affect lakes around the world, ranging in scale from catchment-specific pollutants to the global impacts of climate change. Canada has a large number and diversity of lakes, yet it is not well understood how, where, and when human impacts have affected these lakes at a national scale. The NSERC Canadian Lake Pulse Network so...
Article
Full-text available
Peninsula Lake, Ontario, Canada, is a Precambrian Shield lake that has experienced many environmental stressors since European settlement of the watershed in the mid-1800s, including forest clearance, water-level management, sewage inputs, and land-use changes. The deterioration of water quality by the 1970s prompted mitigation efforts intended to...
Article
Multiple stressors affect water quality and biodiversity in lakes worldwide. However, our understanding of which combinations of stressors are of greatest impact and how lakes have shifted from their pre-industrial baselines is fragmented. Questions remain regarding how multiple trophic groups are affected by global change stressors and whether reg...
Article
• Cladocera serve as important bio‐ and paleo‐indicators of lake food webs and environmental conditions. The ecological optima of cladocerans are often established by regional‐scale calibration sets, with subsequent comparisons to limnological variables. However, due to logistical constraints when sampling large numbers of lakes, this approach ofte...
Article
Simmatis B, Nelligan C, Rühland KM, Jeziorski A, Castro V, Paterson AM, Smol JP. 2020. Tracking ∼200 years of water quality in Muskrat Lake, a eutrophic lake trout lake in Ontario (Canada) with cyanobacterial blooms. Lake Reserv Manage. XX:XXX–XXX. Muskrat Lake is a deep (64 m), eutrophic lake in southeastern Ontario, Canada, that supports a natura...
Article
Nelligan C, Jeziorski A, Rühland KM, Paterson AM, Meyer-Jacob C, Smol JP. A multibasin comparison of historical water quality trends in Lake Manitou, Ontario, a provincially significant lake trout lake. Lake Reserv Manage. XX:XX–XX. Lake Manitou, on Manitoulin Island (Ontario, Canada), is a two-basin lake that supports a natural lake trout populati...
Article
Temperature–oxygen profiles, collected biweekly to monthly for ∼40 years, were used to calculate end-of-summer volume-weighted hypolimnetic oxygen (VWHO) concentrations in six small lakes located in south-central Ontario, Canada. Coherent decreases in thermocline depth and increases in hypolimnetic volume, mean hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen (DO) co...
Article
Simmatis B, Jeziorski A, Zemanek A, Selbie DT, Hyatt K, Fryer JK, Cumming BF, Smol JP. 2018. Long-term reconstruction of deep-water oxygen conditions in Osoyoos Lake: implications for Okanagan River sockeye salmon. Lake Reserve Manage. 34:392–400. Osoyoos Lake is the primary nursery lake supporting sockeye salmon (Onchorhynchus nerka) originating f...
Article
Effluent from diamond mining operations rich in calcium (Ca) has transformed softwater tundra lakes in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Lakes downstream of the Dominion Diamond Corporation Ekati Mine have experienced marked changes in water chemistry and cladoceran community composition since establishment of the mine in 1998. The greatest change...
Article
Recent anthropogenic climate change and the exponential increase over the past few decades of Saharan dust deposition, containing ecologically important inputs of phosphorus (P) and calcium (Ca), are potentially affecting remote aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we examine changes in cladoceran assemblage composition and chlorophyll-a concentratio...
Conference Paper
Lake Trout live within narrow temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) boundaries in the hypolimnia of stratified lakes. These species are vulnerable to environmental stressors including climate warming, which will deepen the thermocline and increase the duration and strength of thermal stratification. These processes exacerbate hypolimnetic hypoxia;...
Article
In recent decades, marked declines in calcium (Ca) concentrations have been noted in many softwater boreal lakes, and are believed to be a long-term consequence of acid deposition as well as other stressors (such as timber harvesting). Reduced Ca availability may act as a potent environmental stressor. Investigations of the direct ecological impact...
Article
Full-text available
The extensive peatlands and lakes of the Far North of Ontario warrant committed scientific attention given their status as a significant carbon sink. Economic interest in this region has recently increased due to the discovery of vast mineral deposits (mainly chromite and nickel) known as the “Ring of Fire”. Mineral exploration and infrastructure p...
Article
Full-text available
Lakewater calcium (Ca) decline affects softwater lakes across the Canadian Shield. Ca decline is one consequence of acid deposition, and has impeded biological recovery in formerly acidified lakes. Reduced Ca availability may advantage taxa better adapted to low Ca waters. Crosson Lake in south-central Ontario (Canada) has an extensive monitoring r...
Article
Nelligan C, Jeziorski A, Rühland KM, Paterson AM, Smol JP. 2016. Managing lake trout lakes in a warming world: A paleolimnological assessment of nutrients and lake production at three Ontario sites. Lake Reserve Manage. 00:1−14. Recent declines in hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in many lakes throughout Ontario have prompted conce...
Article
Full-text available
In response to biotic and abiotic cues, the cladoceran genus Bosmina can undergo changes in body size and appendage length and shape over successive generations. To improve our understanding of the environmental controls on Bosmina size structure, we used paleolimnological techniques to examine Bosmina size responses to the extreme acidification an...
Poster
Full-text available
Lake Trout are a rare and valuable natural resource that are threatened by multiple environmental stressors. With the added threat of climate warming, there is growing concern among resource managers that increased thermal stratification will reduce the habitat quality of deep-water Lake Trout lakes through enhanced oxygen depletion. To address thi...
Presentation
Full-text available
Lake Trout are a rare and valuable natural resource that are threatened by multiple environmental stressors. With the added threat of climate warming, there is growing concern among resource managers that increased thermal stratification will reduce the habitat quality of deep-water Lake Trout lakes through enhanced oxygen depletion. To address thi...
Article
Lakes near Sudbury, Canada, have been exposed to intense acidification and metal contamination from nearby mining and smelting operations. Although lakewater pH improved substantially following the implementation of emission controls in the late 1960s, biological recovery continues to lag behind chemical recovery.We assessed the current state of bi...
Article
In recent decades, softwater lakes across Canada have experienced a wide array of anthropogenic influences, with acidification and climate warming of particular concern. Here, we compare modern and pre-industrial sedimentary diatom assemblages from 36 softwater lakes located on the Canadian Shield in south-central Ontario to determine whether lake...
Article
In the mid-20th century, similar to many lakes in the vicinity of Sudbury, Canada, Middle Lake was severely acidified due to nearby smelting operations. However, this lake is of particular interest because it was limed in 1973, and later fertilized as part of a restoration effort. Here, we use paleolimnological methods to track cladoceran assemblag...
Article
Full-text available
A multi-proxy paleolimnological survey was performed on 13 lakes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) of northern Ontario in order to provide a regional analysis of recent environmental changes in this poorly studied sub-Arctic region. In contrast to the amplified warming experienced by most of the circumpolar Arctic since the mid-19th century, the cli...
Article
Calcium (Ca) concentrations of many softwater lakes on the Canadian Shield have been in decline for decades as a response primarily to regional acid deposition and repeated cycles of forest harvesting. These Ca declines are of ecological interest, as many lakes have fallen to Ca levels detrimental to the fitness of ecologically important Ca-rich cl...
Article
Full-text available
In the region northeast of Wawa, Ontario (Canada), many circumneutral lakes downwind of a nearby iron-sintering plant were strongly acidified (pH 3–4) in response to the emissions of large amounts of sulfur dioxide from 1939–1998. Following closure of the plant in 1998, lakewater pH has returned to circumneutral conditions due to the high buffering...
Article
Aqueous calcium (Ca) concentrations are currently decreasing in many softwater lakes on the Boreal Shield. As the onset of these declines often pre-date direct monitoring programs, indirect techniques are required to examine the impacts of reduced Ca availability on aquatic communities with relatively high Ca demands such as the Cladocera (Class: B...
Article
Declines in lakewater calcium (Ca) concentrations are occurring in many softwater lakes of the Canadian Shield, and likely elsewhere, and there is growing interest regarding the potential impacts that reduced Ca availability may have on aquatic ecosystems. Here, we test the hypotheses that the Ca limitations of Daphnia pulex (reduced growth/surviva...
Article
Full-text available
Aqueous calcium (Ca) concentrations are declining in softwater lakes of the Canadian Shield largely because of decades of acid deposition and afforestation following timber harvesting. Populations of pelagic cladoceran taxa with high Ca requirements, especially Daphnia spp., are declining in response to reduced aqueous Ca availability. However, the...
Article
Daphnia subfossils from lake sediments are useful for exploring the impacts of environmental stressors on aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, taxonomic resolution of Daphnia remains is coarse, as only a small portion of the animal is preserved, and so the identification of daphniid subfossils typically relies upon postabdominal claws. Daphniid claws...
Article
Lake water calcium (Ca) decline has recently been recognized as a stressor impacting softwater lake districts that have experienced long-term patterns of acid deposition and/or timber harvesting. Declining aqueous Ca levels may impact the survival of aquatic biota, particularly Ca-rich cladoceran taxa such as daphniids. Daphnia pulex are sensitive...
Thesis
In recent decades, many softwater lakes on the boreal shield have experienced significant reductions in aqueous calcium (Ca) concentrations. These declines are a long-term consequence of acid deposition due to the depletion of base cations from watershed soils. There is concern that in some lakes [Ca] may be falling to levels detrimental to the com...
Article
The effects of low counts on assemblage inferences in paleolimnological investigations have been examined for many biological proxies, but not yet for Cladocera. Established guidelines leading to the determination of an adequate, minimum count are absent with respect to sampling cladoceran remains from lake sediments. Using simulated subsamples der...
Article
In most Ontario lakes, phosphorus is present in trace quantities, making the precise measurement of concentrations difficult. The considerable variation that results in many datasets can be attributed to imprecise analysis. Even with precise analysis, substantial variation in ice-free whole-lake, mean mixed layer, and spring turnover total phosphor...
Article
Recent but widespread observations of aqueous calcium (Ca) declines in softwater lakes/ponds have spurred research on Ca-rich crustacean zooplankton as paleoindicators of the ecological consequences of Ca declines attributable to acidification, forestry, and other environmental stressors.
Article
Full-text available
Despite reductions in atmospheric sulphur emissions and the resulting decline in acidic deposition, many lakes on the Canadian Shield that have experienced acidification are either recovering at a rate slower than expected or not recovering at all. This lack of recovery is believed to be partly the consequence of the depletion of exchangeable base...
Article
Full-text available
We assess Holocene environmental change at alpine Lake Njulla(6822N, 1842E, 999 m a.s.l.) innorthernmost Sweden using sedimentary remains of chironomid head capsules anddiatoms. We apply regional calibration sets to quantitatively reconstruct meanJuly air temperature (using chironomids and diatoms) and lake-water pH(using diatoms). Both chironomids...

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The value of cladocerans in paleolimnological investigations has long been recognized due to their wide dispersal and the excellent preservation of their abundant exoskeletal remains in lake sediments (Frey 1960). Changes in the abundances of cladoceran remains in sedimentary records are already used extensively to address numerous ecological questions, and I am interested in continuing the development of this paleoindicator. This ongoing project collects my efforts to add to the cladoceran 'paleolimnological toolbox'.
Archived project
The Far North of Ontario is poised to become a major source of economic growth over the course of the next several decades. Untapped mineral wealth (including nickel, copper, zinc, diamonds as well as a significant chromite deposit of strategic importance) within the Ring of Fire has been described as “The most promising mining opportunity in Canada in a century”. The size and extent of these recently discovered mineral deposits ensure that significant mining operations will soon enter development, raising questions on how best to balance economic growth against environmental impact. Evaluating the impactd of any future mining operations will require detailed knowledge of “baseline” or historical environmental conditions; however, due to low population density and limited accessibility, detailed historical environmental data from the Far North of Ontario is largely nonexistent. High latitudes are particularly sensitive to the effects of global climate change, therefore any ecological changes over the next several decades will have to viewed through the lens of rising temperatures as well as industrial development. Therefore, inferring historical conditions using paleolimnological techniques can aid in distinguishing between long-term “natural” variations and directional changes. This project examines sedimentary assembalges (diatoms, cladocerans, and chironomids) within lakes across Northern Ontario with particular attention paid to the "Ring of Fire" and Hudson Bay Lowlands. Northern Ontario is a relatively heterogeneous landscape in terms of permafrost, geology and vegetation, and should therefore also have high regional variation in ecological diversity. To quantify this diversity, "top-bottom" analyses comparing surface sediments (i.e. the “tops” - representative of the last few years) and deeper sediments (i.e. the “bottoms” – corresponding to a time prior to industrial development in North America) examined spatial variation among these modern and historical zooplankton communities, and regional analyses were complemented with intensive “down-core” analyses on a smaller number of lakes to assess the variation that has occurred over the past ~150 years.
Project
Canada's lake trout lakes are a rare and valuable natural resource, both in ecological and economic terms. In Ontario alone, anglers spend an estimated 1.7 billion dollars on goods and services related to recreational fishing, with lake trout the preferred species of many anglers. However, lake trout populations are increasingly threatened by a variety of environmental stressors (e.g., over-exploitation, competition with introduced species, nutrient loading), as well as the "threat-multiplier" of accelerated climate warming. There are growing concerns that oxygen depletion is degrading habitat quality in the deep waters of many lake trout lakes. Moreover, recent investigations suggest that declines in deepwater oxygen concentrations may also be occurring in lakes that have not experienced increased nutrient inputs, or even in those where phosphorus inputs or lake nutrient concentrations have decreased over time. Exceptions to the increased nutrients; decreased deepwater oxygen paradigm is particularly worrying, as current approaches to resource management are prefaced on this major assumption. The limitations of current management techniques are problematic in a multiple stressor world, particularly as climate change affects lake ice cover and thermal stratification, and consequently deepwater oxygen levels. It is clear that managers need a new toolset, one that includes predictive models able to forecast shifts in lake trout habitat while also improving our understanding of historical changes in lake trout habitat. This project (http://post.queensu.ca/~pearl/laketrout/index.html) brings together university researchers and partners with diverse expertise (e.g., modellers, engineers, biologists, paleolimnologists) to develop and apply three distinct, yet complementary, techniques to accurately predict past, present, and future deepwater dissolved oxygen concentrations in lake trout lakes. We intend to provide managers with a scientifically-defensible approach for managing lake trout habitat, provide guidance on mitigation strategies, and ensuring sustainable management.