Adam M Galovan

Adam M Galovan
University of Alberta | UAlberta · Department of Human Ecology

Ph.D.
I am currently exploring various dimensions of couple relationship processes that lead to meaning and connection.

About

72
Publications
28,462
Reads
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708
Citations
Introduction
As a family scientist, I seek to understand couple and family relationships across many different roles, dimensions, and contexts. Partners are wage earners, household managers, and companions, and are often (co)parents. In conducting my research, I have knowledge and experience in advanced multivariate statistics and methods. Indeed, one of my secondary research interests is quantitative research methodology and the related epistemological questions and implications for family science.
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - July 2022
University of Alberta
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2010 - June 2015
University of Missouri
Position
  • Instructor
March 2009 - August 2010
Institute for Research and Evaluation
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2010 - May 2015
University of Missouri
Field of study
  • Human Development and Family Science: Research Methods and Statistics Collateral Area
September 2008 - July 2010
Brigham Young University - Provo Main Campus
Field of study
  • Marriage, Family, and Human Development
July 2005 - May 2008
Utah State University
Field of study
  • Family, Consumer, and Human Development: Family Finance Emphasis

Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Family and relationship researchers ask research questions at the dyadic- or family-level, yet analyses are often conducted at the individual-level. We review theoretical perspectives relative to studying families and dyads and note how they are connected with dyadic analysis techniques. We note differences in theoretical assumptions underlying the...
Article
Full-text available
Family scholars and practitioners rely on theories of relationships to guide our understanding and promotion of healthy intimate relationships; however, assumptions about the self are often implicit and unquestioned. This article describes a strongly relational view of the self that can transform family science by accounting for partners’ ethical r...
Article
Full-text available
As we consider what both family scientists and practitioners can learn from each other, we discuss important advances in relationship and marriage education (RME). We note best practices for research and review recent evaluative findings from randomized controlled trial studies that have important implications for RME. An almost singular RME focus...
Article
Full-text available
A central feature of couple relationships research is the use of self-report measures of relationship satisfaction. Despite the widespread use of such measures in couples’ research, scholars have raised critical questions about satisfaction-focused assessment, including concerns about taking an ontologically individualistic focus. Moving beyond ont...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the increasing popularity of mindfulness and research concerning its role in relationships, there is limited strongly relational theoretical discussion explaining the role of mindfulness in intimate couple relationships. In this article, we articulate a strongly relational view of the role of mindfulness in couple relationships. We then emp...
Chapter
The diversity in transition to parenthood experiences begs the question, what risk and protective factors may moderate these trajectories, contributing to better outcomes for some couples but worse outcomes for others? Based on our review of the recent literature, this question lies at the heart of contemporary transition to parenthood research. In...
Article
When a relationship ends, former partners must make decisions about their online, often public, connections and history, which involve a complex disentangling process. We examined post-breakup behaviors including monitoring, interacting, deleting posts/photos, deleting the former partner, deleting the partner's family/friends, stopping social media...
Article
Full-text available
We described public views toward harm reduction among Canadian adults and tested a social exposure model predicting support for these contentious services, drawing on theories in the morality policy, intergroup relations, addiction, and media communication literatures. A quota sample of 4645 adults (18+ years), randomly drawn from an online researc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In his keynote, Dr. Galovan discusses how a strong relationality paradigm challenges the predominant weakly relational paradigm of ontological individualism in relationship science. He illustrates how taking a relational view of individuals can both add depth to our understanding of relationships and suggest new directions for research and practice...
Presentation
Full-text available
In this interview, Dr. Luke Russell interviews Dr. Adam Galovan about his article published with Dr. David Schramm in the 2018 10th anniversary special issue of the Journal of Family Theory and Review: Strong Relationality and Ethical Responsiveness: A Framework and Conceptual Model for Family Science. The interview is available at: https://soundcl...
Article
Guided by the Stages of Change (SOC) model, we explored relationship-repair behaviors among those thinking about divorce, employing a recent national longitudinal survey of married individuals (N = 745). Person-centered analyses explored whether there were distinct typologies of relationship-repair behaviors. We found four distinct classes: Intense...
Poster
Full-text available
Researchers recognize romantic relationships are significant o Provide meaning and contribute to overall health and wellness (Amato et al., 2003; Antonelli & Dettore, 2014). • Understanding factors related to quality relationships is essential. Past Research o Limited empirical work on relational strengths o Heterosexual research supports the role...
Article
Full-text available
The landscape of couple leisure time has shifted to include and, in some relationships, rely upon technology use. Technology has the potential to intrude upon face-to-face interactions and quality time together—i.e., technoference, phubbing. However, it is also likely that couples engage in shared technology use, which could lead to bonding. In the...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and science performance has been the focus of much recent research, especially due to the prevalence of ICT in our digital society. However, the exploration of this relationship has yielded mixed results. Thus, the current study aims to uncover the learning processes that are l...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recently Galovan and Schramm (2018) argued for a new perspective to understand healthy, vibrant relationships. They argued for a strongly relational view of the self that integrates who one is with the way they respond to others in any given situation. They argued that from a strong relationality perspective, “who we are is who we are in relation t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recently Galovan and Schramm (2018) argued for a new perspective to understand healthy, vibrant relationships. They argued for a strongly relational view of the self that integrates who one is with the way they respond to others in any given situation. They argued that from a strong relationality perspective, “who we are is who we are in relation t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recently Galovan and Schramm (2018) argued for a new perspective to understand healthy, vibrant relationships. They argued for a strongly relational view of the self that integrates who one is with the way they respond to others in any given situation. They argued that from a strong relationality perspective, “who we are is who we are in relation t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recently Galovan and Schramm (2018) argued for a new perspective to understand healthy, vibrant relationships. They argued for a strongly relational view of the self that integrates who one is with the way they respond to others in any given situation. They argued that from a strong relationality perspective, “who we are is who we are in relation t...
Article
Objective Following a training in relationship and marriage education (RME), examine whether applying information at 2 months is associated with application at 6 months and how participants' confidence, utility, and self‐efficacy is associated with learning transfer and application at 2 months posttraining. Background Child welfare professionals a...
Article
Recent advances in mobile technology have allowed individuals to engage in sexting (i.e., sharing sexual words and images via technology). Researchers have examined the prevalence and correlates of sexting, but differences in samples and definitions make it difficult to develop a cohesive picture of adult sexting. This study extends our understandi...
Article
This study reports on a nationally representative sample of married individuals ages 25–50 (N = 3,000) surveyed twice (1 year apart) to investigate the phenomenon of divorce ideation, or what people are thinking when they are thinking about divorce. Twenty-eight percent of respondents had thought their marriage was in serious trouble in the past bu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Grounded in systems theory, coparenting has been posited as a key relationship that links parenting, couple relationships, and child outcomes (Feinberg, 2003). Although conceptual models have linked parenting with coparenting and some research has demonstrated this link (Bonds & Gondoli, 2007), less is known about how parent’s parenting styles comb...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Family scholars and practitioners rely on theories of relationships to guide our understanding and promotion of healthy intimate relationships; however, assumptions about the self are often implicit and unquestioned. This article describes a strongly relational view of the self that can transform family science by accounting for partners’ ethical r...
Poster
Full-text available
Drastically different samples and definitions of sexting have contributed to a mixed picture of the prevalence of adult sexting and associated individual and relationship characteristics. In this study, we extend work on adult sexting by using a nationally-representative sample of U.S. and Canadian adults, using a more nuanced statistical approach...
Article
Technology devices are widely used today, creating opportunities to connect and communicate with distant others while also potentially disrupting communication and interactions between those who are physically present (i.e., technoference or phubbing). These disruptions in couple and coparenting relationships have the potential to negatively impact...
Article
Drawing on five waves of multiple-informant data gathered from focal participants and their parents and intimate partners (n = 360 families) who completed annual surveys in the German Family Panel (pairfam) study, the present investigation examined bidirectional associations between the development of adults’ conflictual and intimate interactions w...
Presentation
Full-text available
In social science research missing data is common. Research participants fail to answer all of the survey questions. Not all participants participate in observational sessions. In longitudinal research, participants drop out of the studies. There are many modern approaches for handling missing data: • Full Information Maximum Likelihood Estimation...
Article
Many judges now require divorcing or legally separating parents with children under age 18 to attend parent education programs (PEPs). Evaluations of these programs have shown their effectiveness, although these have often not been rigorous. Individuals display different patterns of coparenting following divorce, yet researchers have not empiricall...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing from a relational developmental systems perspective (Lerner, Agans, DeSouza, & Gasca, 2013) and data from 1,427 continuously partnered young adult and midlife mixed-sex couples over the first five years of the German Panel Analysis of Intimate Relationships and Family Dynamics (pairfam), this study examined the developmental course of suppo...
Poster
Full-text available
Character traits (Goddard et al., 2016) and virtues (Fowers, 2000) are key predictors of couple relationship satisfaction. Individuals’ way of being (Fife, 2015)—or selflessness towards others (Knapp, 2015)—may be key determinants of family relational outcomes (Goddard et al, 2016). Little research has explored how these factors may be related to o...
Conference Paper
This study employed a nationally representative sample of married individuals ages 25–50 (N = 3,000) surveyed twice, 1 year apart, to investigate divorce ideation, or what people are thinking when they are thinking about divorce. Nearly 30% of respondents had thought their marriage was in serious trouble in the past but not recently. Another 25% ha...
Conference Paper
The majority of U.S. adults now own and use cell phones, computers, tablets, and more. This abundance of technology likely results in brief interruptions in family interactions, which has been termed “technoference” (technology interference). Researchers who examine technoference in couple relationships have found that those who report greater tech...
Poster
Sexual satisfaction is an important predictor of relationship satisfaction and well-being. Therefore, it is important to identify factors that contribute to sexual satisfaction. With daily diary data, we examine how daily desire for sex is associated with daily sexual satisfaction, while also distinguishing between days in which the couple had sex...
Presentation
Full-text available
The current presentation is Part 2 of a two part workshop. This segment focuses on correctly assessing the basic reliability and basic multilevel factor structure of intensive longitudinal data (e.g., daily diary data, etc.) in SPSS, SAS, and Mplus. Family researchers are interested in studying relations between family members, changes within relat...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of literature has examined relations among qualities of character—or marital virtues—and marital outcomes. Results of past research have suggested positive relations between qualities such as generosity, kindness, and forgiveness, and marital well-being. In the present article, we expand on previous research by examining relations be...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Emotion work (EW; activities to enhance significant others' emotional well-being) is an important construct in predicting divisions of household labor, childcare and relationship satisfaction, and contributions to family life (Erickson, 2005). From a systemic framework, the degree to which partners or family members share common perceptions about t...
Poster
Full-text available
Given concerns about the effect of divorce and interparental conflict on children, many judges now require divorcing/legally separating parents with children under age 18 to attend parent education programs (PEPs). In general, evaluations of these programs have shown their effectiveness. Evaluation studies of PEPs, however, have often not been rigo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Many states and counties use divorce education to support the resilience of families in transition. However, the field of divorce education is in need of more rigorous and systematic program evaluation that will allow for a more thorough comparison of different programs. This symposium will presented how four states (Minnesota, North Dakota, Missou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Family researchers are interested in studying relations between family members, changes within relationships and across time, and the resulting outcomes of various family processes. Our methods and research designs must match our research questions and theory (Collins, 2006). Intensive longitudinal data (ILD) designs (longitudinal studies with many...
Presentation
Full-text available
The current presentation is Part 2 of a three part workshop. This segment focuses on the basic analysis of ILD studies in SAS. Family researchers are interested in studying relations between family members, changes within relationships and across time, and the resulting outcomes of various family processes. Our methods and research designs must mat...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores family formation–work fit (i.e., beliefs that work demands fit with desired family size) and its relation to achievement of desired family size, work–family facilitation and conflict, and marital satisfaction using a subsample (N = 690) drawn from the nationally representative Singapore National Study of Work–Life Harmony. Resul...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We discuss the use of similarity measures (e.g., the intraclass correlation coefficient, the stereotype-adjusted intraclass correlation coefficient; Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006) and their place in couple and family research. Similarity measures assess the degree of non-independence in dyads or groups. These measures can be treated as variables of in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A methods article based on this presentation is now in press at the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. Dyadic research grows increasingly common in family studies. The use of dyadic research methods is important because such methods allow for the modeling of non-independence of the data. Perhaps, the most common method used in analyzing...
Article
Full-text available
Using family systems theory and an actor–partner interdependence model, we examine the influence of the division of family work (including fathers’ participation in child rearing) on father–child relationship quality, satisfaction with the family work division, and marital quality. The strongest effect on both spouses’ marital quality is wives’ per...
Article
This study is a cross-cultural comparison of the work-family interface for married women using two nationally representative samples from Singapore (N=467) and the United States of America (N=923). This study demonstrates how the direction and strength of paths in a model of the work-family interface differs between a collectivist nation (Singapore...
Article
Child welfare professionals (CWPs) have historically been ignored as a potential delivery system of relationship and marriage education (RME). Based on a sample of 1015 CWPs from two states, the current study shows that CWPs believe promoting healthy couple and marital relationships is relevant to the families they serve and their work, and that th...
Article
Full-text available
Very little is known about how pornography use is related to the quality of committed relationships. This study examined associations among pornography use, the meaning people attach to its use, sexual quality, and relationship satisfaction. It also looked at factors that discriminate between those who use pornography and those who do not. Particip...
Chapter
An increasing proportion of workers are dual-earners in professional occupations, actively seeking rewarding, full-time careers while at the same time engaging in satisfying home and personal life. However, the demands of today’s global economic environment often make work-life integration problematic (Hill et al., 2006). One adaptive strategy to d...
Article
Full-text available
Head Start programs offer a setting to examine support that facilitates father involvement. The Dakota Father Friendly Assessment (DFFA) is designed to evaluate an organization's level of father-friendliness. To establish its psychometric properties, a sample of North and South Dakota early childhood staff (N = 609) completed the DFFA. A number of...
Article
This article examines the work-family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work-family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the...
Article
Full-text available
Using meta-analysis, we reviewed the effectiveness of resident fathering education programs. Our review identified 16 studies with over 200 reported effect sizes. Results revealed a significant overall effect size of d = .26, with specific significant outcomes ranging from d = .14 to d = .61. Studies with father-only reports produced significantly...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Due to an increasingly sexualized media culture, including increased technology use for things such as sexting, research regarding pornography exposure and its potential influence on adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviors is more timely than ever. This presentation will outline the development of a new survey tool measuring adolescent pornograph...
Article
Full-text available
Using focus group methodology, we examined the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota idea of wicozani (pronounced wee-cho'zah-nee), or "the good way of life", as it relates to individual and family life and assert its value in guiding functional adaptations. Additional theoretical scaffolding is drawn from Vygotsky's (1978) zone of proximal development within...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Using binationally representative data from 615 couples in the United States and Canada, The Couple Well-Being Project explores a strong relationality model of individual and relationship flourishing (Galovan & Schramm, 2018) stemming from the philosophies of Martin Buber and Emmanuel Levinas. While accounting for background influences (e.g., socioeconomic status, racial and cultural background), existing relationship factors (e.g., current relationship quality), external support (e.g., elevation from others), personal states (e.g., stress), contextual challenges (e.g., trials), and individuals’ ethical responsiveness, the project explores how virtues and character traits (e.g., humility, compassion, positivity) and positive relationship-specific applications (e.g., gratitude, forgiveness, affection) contribute to individual and relationship flourishing.