Adam Barnett

Adam Barnett
James Cook University

About

96
Publications
36,216
Reads
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2,402
Citations
Citations since 2016
60 Research Items
1935 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300

Publications

Publications (96)
Article
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Marine organisms normally swim at elevated speeds relative to cruising speeds only during strenuous activity, such as predation or escape. We measured swimming speeds of 29 ram ventilating sharks from 10 species and of three Atlantic bluefin tunas immediately after exhaustive exercise (fighting a capture by hook-and-line) and unexpectedly found all...
Article
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Knowledge of the three-dimensional movement patterns of elasmobranchs is vital to understand their ecological roles and exposure to anthropogenic pressures. To date, comparative studies among species at global scales have mostly focused on horizontal movements. Our study addresses the knowledge gap of vertical movements by compiling the first globa...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the three-dimensional movement patterns of elasmobranchs is vital to understand their ecological roles and exposure to anthropogenic pressures. To date, comparative studies among species at global scales have mostly focused on horizontal movements. Our study addresses the knowledge gap of vertical movements by compiling the first globa...
Article
Full-text available
Despite its consequences for ecological processes and population dynamics, intra-specific variability is frequently overlooked in animal movement studies. Consequently, the necessary resolution to reveal drivers of individual movement decisions is often lost as animal movement data are aggregated to infer average or population patterns. Thus, an em...
Article
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Predicting the potential distribution of species and possible dispersal corridors at a global scale can contribute to better understanding the availability of suitable habitat to move between, and the potential connectivity between regional distributions. Such information increases knowledge of ecological and biogeographic processes, but also has m...
Article
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Significance Global vessel traffic is increasing alongside world economic growth. The potential for rising lethal ship strikes on endangered species of marine megafauna, such as the plankton-feeding whale shark, remains poorly understood since areas of highest overlap are seldom determined across an entire species range. Here we show how satellite...
Article
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Abstract Shark bites are of high public concern globally. Information on shark occurrence and behaviour, and of the effects of human behaviours, can help understand the drivers of shark‐human interactions. In Australia, a number of shark bite clusters occurred over the last decade. One of these took place in Cid Harbour the Whitsundays, Queensland,...
Article
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Abstract Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods are increasingly applied in the marine environment to identify species and community structure. To establish widely applicable eDNA techniques for elasmobranchs, we used the Critically Endangered largetooth sawfish (Pristis pristis Linnaeus, 1758) as a model species for: (1) assessing eDNA particle size dis...
Article
High quality nursery grounds are important for species success and the long-term sustainability of fish stocks. However, even for important fisheries species, what constitutes nursery habitats is only coarsely defined, and details of specific requirements are often lacking. In this study we investigated upstream estuarine areas in central Queenslan...
Article
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Globally, marine animal distributions are shifting in response to a changing climate. These shifts are usually considered at the species level, but individuals are likely to differ in how they respond to the changing conditions. Here, we investigate how movement behaviour and, therefore, redistribution, would differ by sex and maturation class in a...
Article
Animals that disrupt sediments through burrowing or foraging contribute to ecosystem function through bioturbation and ecosystem engineering processes linked to their excavation behavior. Empirical evidence linking behavior with function is rare; yet this information is critical for assessing species‐specific functional roles. Using two stingray sp...
Article
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Sawfishes are among the most threatened families of marine fishes and are susceptible to incidental capture in net fisheries. Since bycatch reduction devices currently used in trawl fisheries are not effective at reducing sawfish catches, new methods to minimise sawfish bycatch are needed. Ideally, these should affect sawfish behaviour and prevent...
Article
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Background: The interplay of animal dispersal and environmental heterogeneity is fundamental for the distribution of biodiversity on earth. In the ocean, the interaction of physical barriers and dispersal has primarily been examined for organisms with planktonic larvae. Animals that lack a planktonic life stage and depend on active dispersal are ho...
Article
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106,107 ✉ replying to A. V. Harry & J. M. Braccini Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03463-w (2021) Our global analysis 1 estimated the overlap and fishing exposure risk (FEI) using the space use of satellite-tracked sharks and longline fishing effort monitored by the automatic identification system (AIS). In the accompanying Comment, Harry...
Article
This article is a response to Murua et al.'s Matters Arising article in Nature, "Shark mortality cannot be assessed by fishery overlap alone," which arose from arising from N. Queiroz et al. Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1444-4 (2019).
Article
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Regional endothermy has evolved several times in marine fishes, and two competing hypotheses are generally proposed to explain the evolutionary drivers behind this trait: thermal niche expansion and elevated cruising speeds. Evidence to support either hypothesis is equivocal, and the ecological advantages conferred by endothermy in fishes remain de...
Article
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Provisioning activities in wildlife tourism often lead to short-term animal aggregations during the feeding events. However, the presence of groups does not necessarily mean that individuals interact among each other and form social networks. At the Shark Reef Marine Reserve in Fiji, several dozen bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) regularly visit a...
Article
Wildlife tourism uses various stimuli to attract species and facilitate close encounters. Such activities are often referred to as provisioning, however the term is used interchangeably, and sometimes erroneously, with attracting, feeding, luring, and chumming, all of which lack consistent definitions. Here, we review the current use of provisionin...
Article
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Cosmopolitan marine pelagic species display variable patterns of population connectivity among the world’s major oceans. While this information is crucial for informing management, information is lacking for many ecologically important species, including apex predators. In this study we examine patterns of genetic structure in the broadnose sevengi...
Article
Delineation of population structure (i.e. stocks) is crucial to successfully manage exploited species and to address conservation concerns for threatened species. Fish migration and associated movements are key mechanisms through which discrete populations mix and are thus important determinants of population structure. Detailed information on fish...
Article
COVID-19 restrictions have led to an unprecedented global hiatus in anthropogenic activities, providing a unique opportunity to assess human impact on biological systems. Here, we describe how a national network of acoustic tracking receivers can be leveraged to assess the effects of human activity on animal movement and space use during such globa...
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Stakeholder engagement is essential to conserve ecosystems and associated biodiversity. Outdoor recreation specialists represent stakeholder groups that often rely on specific healthy ecosystems and have unique incentives to contribute to conservation and stewardship. We introduce the concept of habitat-dependent outdoor recreation conservation org...
Article
Top predators are important components of healthy ecosystems but are at risk of overexploitation due to insufficient data on life-history characteristics and population dynamics to guide management. We investigated the movements and growth rates of the broadnose sevengill shark Notorynchus cepedianus in southern Africa, using data from the Oceanogr...
Article
Elasmobranch tourism is a rapidly expanding global industry. While this industry can provide community and conservation benefits, it presents risks to target species, environments and humans when inappropriately managed. To ensure appropriate management is implemented, there is a need to identify the prevalence of elasmobranch tourism globally, the...
Article
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Accuracy in representing, communicating and reporting science is critical to the translation of science into knowledge. Any lack of accuracy degrades the quality and reliability of consequent decisions. One common cause of inaccuracy is the use of superseded paradigmatic concepts with a lack of careful validation. This leads to evidentiary dissonan...
Article
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The known distribution of manta rays in Australian waters is patchy, with records primarily centred around tourism hotspots. We collated 11,614 records of M. alfredi from photo‐ID databases (n= 10,715), aerial surveys (n= 378) and online reports (n= 521). The study confirms an uninterrupted coastal distribution from north of 26°S and 31°S on the we...
Article
The presence of lipids and urea in elasmobranch tissues can affect carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope values, introducing bias in food web interpretations. Information on how lipids and urea affect δ13C/δ15N is only available for < 5% of ~ 1150 described elasmobranch species and results are highly variable among existing studies. Here...
Article
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Effective ocean management and conservation of highly migratory species depends on resolving overlap between animal movements and distributions and fishing effort. Yet, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach combining satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of...
Preprint
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The reef manta ray, Mobula alfredi, occurs in tropical and warm temperate coastal waters, and around islands and reefs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Published records that relate to the distribution of M. alfredi in the south-east Indian and south-west Pacific Oceans are largely restricted to locations where there is a focus on manta ray ecotou...
Article
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In comparison to other behaviours, large predators expend relatively large amounts of energy foraging for prey, based on expected high return. Documenting how they manage costs and benefits of feeding is difficult, particularly for marine predators. In July and August of 2004 and 2005, we combined animal-borne video, accelerometry and depth sensors...
Article
• Essential habitats are areas required to support specific functions, such as providing foraging grounds, shelter or used for reproductive purposes. For mobile aquatic species that move throughout numerous components of the seascape, identifying essential habitats within a species' broader distribution range is crucial to understanding their ecolo...
Article
Understanding the range of habitats needed to complete life-cycles is essential for the effective conservation and management of species. We combined otolith microchemistry, acoustic tracking, and underwater video to determine patterns of seascape use by an assemblage of tropical snappers, including two little-known species of high economic importa...
Article
Wildlife tourism is a growing industry, with significant conservation and socio-economic benefits. Concerns have however been raised about the possible impacts of this industry on the long-term behaviour, health and fitness of the animal species tourists come to see (the target species), particularly when those species are regularly fed to improve...
Article
Non-lethal methods for deriving age estimates from species of conservation significance or those supporting catch-and-release sport fisheries can assist in their sustainable management. In this study we tested if dorsal spines provide equivalent age estimates to otoliths for two species of large tropical snappers (Lutjanus goldiei and L. fuscescens...
Article
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Concurrently, assessing the effectiveness of marine protected areas and evaluating the degree of risk from humans to key species provide valuable information that can be integrated into conservation management planning. Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are a wide‐ranging ecologically important species subject to various threats. The aim of this stu...
Article
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Scavenging is an important component to the overall ecology of consumers in virtually all ecosystems on Earth. Given the energetic benefits of foraging on these resource subsidies, opportunistic predators will adjust their behaviors accordingly to maximize access. One of the many consequences of large-scale scavenging opportunities is species inter...
Article
The redistribution of species has emerged as one of the most pervasive impacts of anthropogenic climate warming, and presents many societal challenges. Understanding how temperature regulates species distributions is particularly important for mobile marine fauna such as sharks given their seemingly rapid responses to warming, and the socio-politic...
Article
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Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fi...
Article
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Tiger sharks were sampled off the western (Ningaloo Reef, Shark Bay) and eastern (the Great Barrier Reef; GBR, Queensland and New South Wales; NSW) coastlines of Australia. Multiple tissues were collected from each shark to investigate the effects of location, size and sex of sharks on δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N stable isotopes among these locations. Isotopic c...
Article
In recent decades, public interest in apex predators has led to the creation and expansion of predator-focused wildlife tourism. As wildlife tourism has become an increasing topic of study for both social and biological scientists, researchers have debated whether these activities serve conservation goals by providing non-con-sumptive values for wi...
Article
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Predators play a crucial role in the structure and function of ecosystems. However, the magnitude of this role is often unclear, particularly for large marine predators, as predation rates are difficult to measure directly. If relevant biotic and abiotic parameters can be obtained, then bioenergetics modelling offers an alternative approach to esti...
Article
Wildlife tourism is often extolled for its contribution to conservation. However, understanding the effects of tourism activities on the health of target animals is required to fully assess conservation benefits. Shark tourism operators often use food rewards to attract sharks in close proximity to tourists, but nothing is known about the contribut...
Article
The increasing popularity of marine wildlife tourism (MWT) worldwide calls for assessment of its conservation outcomes and the development of appropriate management frameworks to ensure the conservation of the species and habitats involved as well as the long-term sustainability of this industry. While many studies have examined the positive and/or...
Article
Determining the dynamics of ecological communities following periods of anthropogenic change is critical to assessing the effectiveness of management strategies. Several coastal areas in south-eastern Australia were proclaimed shark refuge areas (SRAs) following overfishing of the school shark (Galeorhinus galeus) during the 1940s and 1950s. In con...
Article
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The ability of predators to switch between hunting and scavenging (facultative scavenging) carries both short-term survival and long-term fitness advantages. However, the mechanistic basis for facultative scavenging remains poorly understood. The co-occurrence of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) at Raine Island (A...
Article
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Animals exhibit various physiological and behavioural strategies for minimizing travel costs. Fins of aquatic animals play key roles in efficient travel and, for sharks, the functions of dorsal and pectoral fins are considered well divided: the former assists propulsion and generate lateral hydrodynamic forces during turns and the latter generates...
Data
Shark-mounted video of three S. mokarran swimming at South Bimini Island, Bahamas. Video supplied by Andy B. Casagrande IV.
Data
Shark-mounted video of 295 cm S. mokarran swimming at Batt Reef, Queensland, Australia.
Data
Video of two S. mokarran swimming rolled in public aquaria in the United States.
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-12, Supplementary Tables 1-2, Supplementary Notes 1-5 and Supplementary References
Article
Wildlife tourism has been shown to cause behavioural changes to numerous species. Yet, there is still little understanding if behavioural changes have consequences for health and fitness. The current study combined accelerometry and respirometry to show that provisioning whitetip reef sharks (Trianadon obesus) for tourism increases their daily ener...
Article
The Niugini black bass, Lutjanus goldiei, is an estuarine and freshwater fish species endemic to New Guinea and the surrounding islands. It is the focus of a growing sportfishing industry that has the potential to provide long-standing benefits to local people. Plantation agriculture, mining and logging are expanding in many catchments where L. gol...
Article
Ecotourism ventures in developing countries are often among the few alternatives for enhancing sustainable livelihoods without altering traditional ways of life. The best way forward is to continually develop and implement best practice guidelines and, in particular, to flexibly develop them to suit individual cases. We conduct a multidisciplinary...
Article
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Coastal ecosystems such as estuaries, tidal wetlands and shallow coastal waters are often highly productive and provide important habitats to many recreationally and commercially important fish and invertebrates that use these areas as nursery, feeding and/or reproduction grounds. The diversity of coastlines found worldwide results in differences i...
Article
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Protecting essential habitats through the implementation of area closures has been recognized as a useful management tool for rebuilding overfished populations and minimizing habitat degradation. School shark (Galeorhinus galeus) have suffered significant stock declines in Australia; however, recent stock assessments suggest the population may have...
Article
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Capture-mark-recapture models are useful tools for estimating demographic parameters but often result in low precision when recapture rates are low. Low recapture rates are typical in many study systems including fishing-based studies. Incorporating auxiliary data into the models can improve precision and in some cases enable parameter estimation....
Article
Body size is a key determinant of metabolic rate, but logistical constraints have led to a paucity of energetics measurements from large water-breathing animals. As a result, estimating energy requirements of large fish generally relies on extrapolation of metabolic rate from individuals of lower body mass using allometric relationships that are no...