Abdulaziz Abubshait

Abdulaziz Abubshait
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia | IIT · S4hri

Doctor of Philosophy

About

29
Publications
2,558
Reads
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180
Citations
Citations since 2016
29 Research Items
179 Citations
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - present
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2016 - November 2019

Publications

Publications (29)
Preprint
To combat the spread of the COVID-19 virus, countries enforced quarantines, physical and social restrictions on people. These restrictions left many feeling isolated and lonely due to prolonged quarantines and lockdowns. This raises questions about using robots as social support to alleviate these symptoms, while still complying with restrictions a...
Preprint
With the increasing use of social robots and automated machines in our daily lives, roboticists need to design robots that are suitable for human-robot collaboration. Prior work suggests that robots that are perceived to be intentional (i.e., are able to experience mental life capacities), can, in most cases, positively affect human-robot collabora...
Article
Full-text available
When we read fiction, we encounter characters that interact in the story. As such, we encode that information and comprehend the stories. Prior studies suggest that this comprehension process is facilitated by taking the perspective of characters during reading. Thus, two questions of interest are whether people take the perspective of characters t...
Article
Full-text available
As technological advances progress, we find ourselves in situations where we need to collaborate with artificial agents (e.g., robots, autonomous machines and virtual agents). For example, autonomous machines will be part of search and rescue missions, space exploration and decision aids during monitoring tasks (e.g., baggage-screening at the airpo...
Article
Leading another person’s gaze to establish joint attention facilitates social interaction. Previously it was found that we look back at agents who engage in joint attention quicker than at agents who display this behaviour less frequently. This paper serves to fill in two remaining knowledge gaps. Firstly, we examined whether this looking-back beha...
Article
Understanding others' nonverbal behavior is essential for social interaction, as it allows, among others, to infer mental states. Although gaze communication, a well-established nonverbal social behavior, has shown its importance in inferring others' mental states, not much is known about the effects of irrelevant gaze signals on cognitive conflict...
Preprint
Understanding others’ nonverbal behavior is essential for social interaction, as it allows, among others, to infer mental states. While gaze communication, a well-established nonverbal social behavior, has shown its importance in inferring others’ mental states, not much is known about the effects of irrelevant gaze signals on cognitive conflict ma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
When humans interact with artificial agents, they adopt various stances towards them. On one side of the spectrum, people might adopt a mechanistic stance towards an agent and explain its behavior using its functional properties. On the other hand, people can adopt the intentional stance towards artificial agents and explain their behavior using me...
Article
Full-text available
Social signals, such as changes in gaze direction, are essential cues to predict others’ mental states and behaviors (i.e., mentalizing). Studies show that humans can mentalize with nonhuman agents when they perceive a mind in them (i.e., mind perception). Robots that physically and/or behaviorally resemble humans likely trigger mind perception, wh...
Article
Full-text available
Social agents rely on the ability to use feedback to learn and modify their behavior. The extent to which this happens in social contexts depends on motivational, cognitive and/or affective parameters. For instance, feedback-associated learning occurs at different rates when the outcome of an action (e.g., winning or losing in a gambling task) affe...
Preprint
Gaze behavior is an important social signal between humans, as it communicates locations of interest. People typically orient their attention to where others look, as this informs about others’ intentions and future actions. Studies have shown that humans can engage in similar gaze behavior with robots, but presumably more so when they adopt the in...
Article
Full-text available
Social species rely on the ability to modulate feedback-monitoring in social contexts to adjust one's actions and obtain desired outcomes. When being awarded positive outcomes during a gambling task, feedback-monitoring is attenuated when strangers are rewarded, as less value is assigned to the awarded outcome. This difference in feedback-monitorin...
Preprint
Full-text available
When humans interact with artificial agents, they adopt various stances towards them. On one side of the spectrum, people might adopt a mechanistic stance towards an agent and explain its behavior using its functional properties. On the other hand, people can adopt the intentional stance towards artificial agents and explain their behavior using me...
Preprint
Leading another person’s gaze to establish joint attention facilitates social interaction. Previously it was found that we look back at agents who engage in joint attention frequently and more quickly than agents who display this behaviour less often. This paper serves to fill in two knowledge gaps on the topic. Firstly, we examine whether this loo...
Article
Full-text available
Gaze behavior is an important social signal between humans as it communicates locations of interest. People typically orient their attention to where others look as this informs about others' intentions and future actions. Studies have shown that humans can engage in similar gaze behavior with robots but presumably more so when they adopt the inten...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding and reacting to others' nonverbal social signals, such as changes in gaze direction (i.e., gaze cue), are essential for social interactions, as it is important for processes such as joint attention and mentalizing. Although attentional orienting in response to gaze cues has a strong reflexive component, accumulating evidence shows tha...
Preprint
Attentional orienting to nonverbal social signals is an important social behavior that humans engage in. While prior work still debates if attentional orienting to others’ gaze is reflexive or volitional, studies suggest that it depends on the observer’s cognitive resources. Here, we illustrate that when humans exert increased mental effort when tr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gaze behavior is an important social signal between humans as it communicates locations of interest. People typically orient their attention to where others look, as this informs about others’ intentions and future actions. Studies have shown that humans can engage in similar gaze behavior with robots, but presumably more so when they adopt the int...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
When we interact with others, we use nonverbal behavior such as changes in gaze direction to make inferences about what people think or what they want to do next – a process called mentalizing. Previous studies have shown that how we react to others’ gaze signals depends on how much “mind” we ascribe to the gazer, and that this process of mind perc...
Article
Full-text available
In social interactions, we rely on non-verbal cues like gaze direction to understand the behaviour of others. How we react to these cues is determined by the degree to which we believe that they originate from an entity with a mind capable of having internal states and showing intentional behaviour, a process called mind perception . While prior wo...
Article
Full-text available
With the rise of increasingly complex artificial intelligence (AI), there is a need to design new methods to monitor AI in a transparent, human-aware manner. Decades of research have demonstrated that people, who are not aware of the exact performance levels of automated algorithms, often experience a mismatch in expectations. Consequently, they wi...
Article
Full-text available
In social interactions, we rely on nonverbal cues like gaze direction to understand the behavior of others. How we react to these cues is affected by whether they are believed to originate from an entity with a mind, capable of having internal states (i.e., mind perception). While prior work has established a set of neural regions linked to social-...
Article
Full-text available
The Uncanny Valley (UV) hypothesis states that agents that look humanlike but are not perfectly human elicit feelings of eeriness in human observers, associated with negative ratings of mind, trust and likability. However, empirical evidence for the UV is sparse and individual dispositions are not considered to moderate the UV. The present study as...
Article
Full-text available
Gaze following occurs automatically in social interactions, but the degree to which gaze is followed depends on whether an agent is perceived to have a mind, making its behavior socially more relevant for the interaction. Mind perception also modulates the attitudes we have towards others, and determines the degree of empathy, pro-sociality and mor...

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