Abbie Chapman

Abbie Chapman
University College London | UCL · Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research

PhD, MSc Oceanography, BSc Geography with Physical Oceanography

About

19
Publications
3,970
Reads
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203
Citations
Introduction
Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research at University College London. Investigating the trade-offs between agricultural development, food security, and biodiversity in Ghana, Ethiopia, and Zambia as part of the SENTINEL project (https://www.sentinel-gcrf.org/). Co-Principal Investigator of the sFDvent Working Group funded by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (https://www.idiv.de/?id=423) focusing on the biodiversity of deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems using a statistical, trait-based approach (www.abbiechapman.com).
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - July 2017
University of Southampton
Position
  • Postgraduate Demonstrator
Description
  • Led GIS tutorials and discussion sessions for Masters students on a ‘Deep-Sea Ecology’ course, assisted with undergraduate statistics sessions for the Dale Fort field course, and mentored postgraduate and undergraduate students.
Education
October 2014 - November 2018
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Deep-sea Ecology
September 2012 - September 2013
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • MSc Oceanography
September 2009 - July 2012
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • BSc Geography with Physical Oceanography

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Diet and body mass are inextricably linked in vertebrates: while herbivores and carnivores have converged on much larger sizes, invertivores and omnivores are, on average, much smaller, leading to a roughly U-shaped relationship between body size and trophic guild. Although this U-shaped trophic-size structure is well documented in extant terrestri...
Article
Full-text available
As agricultural land use and climate change continue to pose increasing threats to biodiversity in sub-Saharan Africa, efforts are being made to identify areas where trade-offs between future agricultural development and terrestrial biodiversity conservation are expected to be greatest. However, little research so far has focused on freshwater biod...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Scenario analysis is a powerful tool that allows policymakers to explore plausible futures in a systematic manner. This technical briefing describes the process to translate the ‘storylines’ that emerged from a stakeholder workshop in Zambia in 2018, into maps of projected land cover change to 2050.
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the dynamics of agricultural expansion, their drivers, and interactions is critical for biodiversity conservation, ecosystem-services provision, and the future sustainability of agricultural development in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, there is limited understanding of the drivers of agricultural expansion. A systematic review of...
Article
Full-text available
In 2010 the Conference of the Parties (COP) for the Convention on Biological Diversity revised and updated a Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020, which included the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. Here a group of early career researchers mentored by senior scientists, convened as part of the 4th World Conference on Marine Biodiversity, reflects o...
Chapter
Mining the extensive accumulations of minerals on the seafloor of the deep ocean might provide important resources, but it also has the potential to lead to widespread environmental impacts. Some of these impacts are unknown, and some may differ for the three main resource types: polymetallic nodules, seafloor massive sulphides, and polymetallic (c...
Article
Full-text available
br/>Motivation Traits are increasingly being used to quantify global biodiversity patterns, with trait databases growing in size and number, across diverse taxa. Despite growing interest in a trait‐based approach to the biodiversity of the deep sea, where the impacts of human activities (including seabed mining) accelerate, there is no single repo...
Article
Biodiversity continues to decline under the effect of multiple human pressures. We give a brief overview of the main pressures on biodiversity, before focusing on the two that have a predominant effect: land-use and climate change. We discuss how interactions between land-use and climate change in terrestrial systems are likely to have greater impa...
Article
A key question for the future management of the oceans is whether mineral deposits that exist on the seafloor of the deep ocean can be extracted without significant adverse effects to environmental sustainability and marine life. The potential impacts of mining are wide-ranging and will vary depending on the type of metal-rich mineral deposit being...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanisms leading to variation in diversity over energetic gradients continue to challenge ecologists. Changes in diversity may reflect the environmental capacity to support species' coexistence through increased niche packing or niche space expansion. Current ecological theory predicts that increases in energy may lead to both scenarios but not t...
Thesis
The study of the functional component of biodiversity has experienced a recent resurgence in popularity because of its capacity to inform our understanding of the relationships between species and their environments for their conservation and management. Ecological traits, such as body size and trophic level, can be used to compare communities that...
Preprint
Full-text available
The taxonomic composition of hydrothermal vent communities differs markedly on a global scale, forming distinct biogeographic provinces. The relative biodiversity of these areas can be assessed using traits as a common, cross-province ‘currency’. First, we used well-studied Juan de Fuca Ridge vents (NE Pacific) to assess trait data availability for...
Preprint
Full-text available
The taxonomic composition of hydrothermal vent communities differs markedly on a global scale, forming distinct biogeographic provinces. The relative biodiversity of these areas can be assessed using traits as a common, cross-province ‘currency’. First, we used well-studied Juan de Fuca Ridge vents (NE Pacific) to assess trait data availability for...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Rare species typically contribute more to functional diversity than common species. However, humans have altered the occupancy and abundance patterns of many species - the basis upon which we define ‘rarity’. Here, we use a globally unique dataset from hydrothermal vents – an untouched ecosystem – to test whether rare species over-contribute to...
Presentation
Abstract available here: goo.gl/N73K9Y. Awarded ’Best Student Talk’ by the Deep-Sea Biology Society.
Presentation
Seminar delivered at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Germany
Poster
Full-text available
This poster is an introduction to my PhD research, using a trait-based approach to diversity at the intensively and frequently studied Juan de Fuca Ridge vents of the Northeast Pacific Ocean.
Poster
Full-text available
This poster was presented during a NERC Advanced Training Short Course ('An introductory molecular phylogenetics course: molecular diagnostics for species identification and evolutionary analysis') at the Natural History Museum in London.

Questions

Question (1)
Question
R help on gowdis{FD} refers to the method for ordinal variables.
Podani - Equations 2a-b of Podani (1999)
Metric - Equation 3 (Podani, 1999)
Classic - treats ordinal variables as continuous variables

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This pilot project asks: how does enhanced gender equity affect conservation outcomes in natural resource management (NRM) projects? We aim to advance understandings of: 1) the relationship between societal gender equality and environmental conservation and the trade-offs involved; 2) the mechanisms through which aspects of gender equity and inequity may influence conservation effectiveness; 3) the factors enabling: the meaningful participation of women in NRM, recognition of women’s knowledge, and equitable distribution of costs and benefits; and 4) the role of men’s and wider societal perceptions and behaviour in influencing equity. The project will work at two scales. For research aim 1 we will explore large-scale social and ecological data across sub-Saharan Africa. A case study in Kenya will allow us to explore aims 2,3, and 4. In the pastoral rangelands of Kenya there are efforts to involve women in NRM, high levels of biodiversity but complex pressures on the social-ecological system. This is a cross-disciplinary and collaborative project between UCL Anthropology, UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research (CBER), and Fauna & Flora International (FFI).