Abagail Mcwilliams

Abagail Mcwilliams
University of Illinois at Chicago | UIC · College of Business Administration

PhD, The Ohio State University

About

61
Publications
339,193
Reads
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20,369
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2000 - present
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • Professor of Strategic Management
July 2000 - present
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • Professor
August 1993 - June 2000
Arizona State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 1982 - August 1987
The Ohio State University
Field of study
  • Economics

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
The authors analyze the creation and capture of private and social value by firms that adopt corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies. Strategic CSR is defined as any “responsible” activity that allows a firm to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage, regardless of motive. To provide a roadmap for managers to accomplish this objective,...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we extend the resource-based theory of the firm to show that it can be used to analyse the effectiveness of competitive strategies. Specifically, we demonstrate that political strategies aimed at raising rivals' costs by blocking the use of substitute resources may create the opportunity for a firm to capitalize on resources that are...
Article
Full-text available
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a mandate for strategic managers and is often an important element of a differentiation strategy, but there is little research on how managers can make socially responsible decisions within the context of competitive strategy. In this study we explain how data envelopment analysis (DEA) results can b...
Article
In this paper we reflect on two related questions. First, how have we arrived at a position where null hypothesis significance testing is the dominant criterion employed by quantitative researchers when deciding on whether or not a result is ‘significant'? Second, how might we change the practice of quantitative management research by promoting a g...
Book
Full-text available
Debate surrounding corporate social responsibility (CSR) has churned through the academic literature for decades. Much of the debate has resulted from a lack of understanding of the economic consequences of socially responsible behavior on the part of for-profit firms. Friedman set the stage for much of the debate in his 1970 Times Magazine piece t...
Article
Purpose To develop an understanding of communication among agribusiness journals and to examine patterns of citations that allow the measurement and description of the structure of communication flows among those journals in a network. Design/methodology/approach The data for this study were gathered from the Journal Citation Reports (JCR) publish...
Article
Full-text available
The foundation of sustainability science is the effort to understand the fundamental interactions between nature and society, and to guide these interactions along sustainable trajectories (Miller et al. Sustain Sci 9(2):240–246, 2014). More importantly, sustainability science aims at creating knowledge needed to improve relevancy and quality of su...
Article
Full-text available
The past few decades have been characterized by a growing body of profit-seeking public service areas with the understanding that profit-seeking organizations will deliver public services more efficiently than government can. These sectors include, but are not limited to, health care, corrections and education. Governments have created quasi market...
Preprint
The past few decades have been characterized by a growing body of profit-seeking public service areas with the understanding that profit-seeking organizations will deliver public services more efficiently than government can. These sectors include, but are not limited to, health care, corrections and education. Governments have created quasi market...
Article
Full-text available
Data envelopment analysis (DEA) can aid managerial decision-making because it offers an opportunity to measure organizational performance in a holistic manner, aggregating data from partial indicators into a single comprehensive measure. However, there are some methodological hazards associated with the use of DEA that are especially relevant to ma...
Chapter
Actions of firms that contribute to social welfare, beyond what is required for profit maximization, are classified as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The acceptance of CSR by business scholars and practitioners has a spotted history. While scholars debated the legitimacy of CSR, consumers and investors developed clear preferences for social...
Article
Full-text available
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a mandate for strategic managers and is often an important element of a differentiation strategy, but there is little research on how managers can make socially responsible decisions within the context of competitive strategy. In this study we explain how data envelopment analysis (DEA) results can b...
Article
Full-text available
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a mandate for strategic managers and is often an important element of a differentiation strategy, but there is little research on how managers can make socially responsible decisions within the context of competitive strategy. In this study we explain how data envelopment analysis (DEA) results can b...
Article
Full-text available
We examine how entrepreneurial ventures can employ sustainability to do well (create a competitive advantage) by doing better (creating more social good than is created by Corporate Social Responsibility). We compare and contrast CSR and sustainability and examine factors influencing the competitive strategies of large, established firms versus ent...
Article
Full-text available
Although abundant evidence demonstrates a positive relationship between employee ownership and firm performance, two questions remain unanswered: why does employee ownership fail to enhance the performance of some adopting firms, and what are the mechanisms by which employee ownership enhances performance? We argue that employee ownership has the p...
Article
Full-text available
When large, for-profit firms engage in social value creation, this is referred to as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the measure of social value created is called corporate social performance (CSP). For many firms CSR is a philanthropic aside, not a core business objective and therefore they leave the measurement of CSP to outside institu...
Article
Full-text available
Expanding recent interest in management journals, we address the question of "who is talking to whom" by modeling the social network of management scholars using citation patterns between 23 management journals over a five-year period. Using cluster analysis, we found that there are a number of distinct sub-networks of journals, where the exchange...
Article
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has experienced a journey that is almost unique in the pantheon of ideas in the management literature. Its phenomenal rise to prominence in the 1990s and 2000s suggests that it is a relatively new area of academic research. This book seeks to offer such a critical reflection on some of the major debates that co...
Chapter
Full-text available
As a field of inquiry, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is still in an embryonic stage. The study of CSR has been hampered by a lack of consensus on the definition of the phenomenon, unifying theory, measures, and unsophisticated empirical methods. Globalization has also added to the complexity of CSR issues to be addressed. Despite these conc...
Book
The Oxford Handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility is a review of the academic research that has both prompted, and responded to, the issues of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Business schools, the media, the corporate sector, governments, and non-governmental organizations have all begun to pay more attention to these issues in recent y...
Chapter
Full-text available
Corporate citizenship (CC) is broader than existing concepts in the business and society literature, such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate social performance (CSP). CC considers the role of corporations as social institutions and their ability to respond to non-market pressures, especially in a global context. Consistent with...
Article
In this introduction to the special issue, we provide a brief review of the CSR literature with attention to some of the difficulties in globalizing the existing CSR concepts. Following this we provide a brief summary of each of the four papers that comprise the special issue, with emphasis on the unique contribution of each.
Article
We describe a variety of perspectives on corporate social responsibility (CSR), which we use to develop a framework for consideration of the strategic implications of CSR. Based on this framework, we propose an agenda for additional theoretical and empirical research on CSR. We then review the papers in this special issue and relate them to the pro...
Article
Full-text available
This study was motivated by the admonition of Professor Hambrick, as president of the Academy of Management, that the field does not “matter” much. One reason for this may be that management scholars have not done a good job of disseminating knowledge to scholars in related fields. The article examines this proposition by assessing the citation pat...
Article
Full-text available
There have been numerous studies that rank journals based on relative quality. These have generally failed to address some important theoretical and empirical issues relating to productivity. As an alternative, the authors outline a theoretical framework in which an academic journal is considered to be a “producer” of intellectual output. Using the...
Article
Full-text available
We outline a supply and demand model of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Based on this framework, we hypothesize that a firm's level of CSR will depend on its size, level of diversification, research and development, advertising, government sales, consumer income, labor market conditions, and stage in the industry life cycle. From these hypot...
Article
Full-text available
This article extends the literature on the role of human resources in global competitiveness by focusing on the ability of transnational firms to create a sustainable competitive advantage through the strategic management of their work force. We focus on the ability of mangers to strategically draw from multiple human resource labor pools, creating...
Article
This study examines the use of formal rankings of journals by management departments for personnel decision purposes. We posit that the probability of adopting a list of formal rankings is related to a set of characteristics of the department. Few schools have formal lists of journals. Our empirical findings imply that the probability of adopting a...
Article
Researchers have reported a positive, negative, and neutral impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on financial performance. This inconsistency may be due to flawed empirical analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate a particular flaw in existing econometric studies of the relationship between social and financial performance. These studies...
Article
Researchers have reported a positive, negative, and neutral impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on financial performance. This inconsistency may be due to flawed empirical analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate a particular flaw in existing econometric studies of the relationship between social and financial performance. These studies...
Article
Full-text available
Organizational researchers are increasingly using the event study methodology to assess the effect of strategic decisions on firm performance. Unfortunately, event studies alone are inadequate because, at best, they provide estimates of the shortrun impact on shareholders only and not on other corporate stakeholders. Furthermore, event study findin...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors estimate the returns to job search, mobility, and the interaction of search and mobility for young men and women. They find statistically significant gender differences in mobility patterns and search behavior, but not in the returns to a given behavior. Both men and women engag...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the use of event studies in management research and found that there was inadequate attention paid to theoretical and research design issues. This lack of attention may lead to false inferences regarding the significance of the events and the validity of the theories being tested. To illustrate the extent of this problem, we attempted t...
Article
Studies of gender differences in the returns to job mobility have yielded conflicting results. The authors examine whether there are gender differences in mobility patterns or in the returns to different types of mobility. Their results, based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, imply that there are gender differences in mobility patterns...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the use of event studies in management research. We find that there is too little attention paid to critical research design issues. This may lead to faire inferences regarding the significance of events. To prevent such misleading inferences, we recommend a set of standards for publication.
Article
Full-text available
In this essay, the authors discuss the link between the new resource-based view of the firm and the old structure-conduct-performance (S-C-P) paradigm. The authors find that the resource-based view of the firm, like the S-C-P paradigm, is based on the assumptions that demand is known and constant and that competition is a state. This limits the app...
Article
Full-text available
This analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth shows that cumulative job mobility had statistically significant effects on wages in the years 1979-88. The direction of the wage effects (positive or negative) and their magnitude varied depending on the type of cumulative mobility examined: employee-initiated versus employer-ini...
Article
Full-text available
Cooperative strategies and interorganizational linkages, or quasi-integration, in vertical relationships are important concerns to strategy researchers and practitioners. In this paper, we present a model that integrates insights from transaction cost theory (an economic construct) and resource-based theory (a strategic management construct) to exp...
Article
Motivated by a desire to understand the origin of the great consolidation movement at the turn of the last century, this paper examines the unique history of the American trusts and proposes a new interpretation of the motives and consequences of these consolidations. It is hypothesized that the same demand and supply conditions that made multiplan...
Article
Full-text available
This paper integrates the theories and findings of micro-level organizational behaviour/human resource management research with the macrolevel resource-based view of the firm, specifically presenting a firm's human resources as an important potential source of sustained competitive advantage. Unlike practice-oriented discussions that assume the rol...
Article
Full-text available
This paper integrates the theories and findings of micro-level organizational behavior/human resource management research with the macro-level resource-based view of the firm, specifically presenting a firm's human resources as an important source of sustained competitive advantage. Unlike practice-oriented discussions that assume the role of human...
Article
Many believe that antitrust policy has had a dramatic impact on merger strategies in the United States. For this to be true, enforcement of antitrust laws must affect a wide range of firms, not just those firms whose mergers are contested. This study tests whether or not firms engaged in uncontested mergers are affected by antitrust enforcement, as...
Article
The strategic management field has derived many of its theoretical concepts from other social science disciplines including economics, psychology, and sociology. Industrial organization (10) economics and the structure-conduct-performance paradigm, in particular, provided many of the building blocks upon which strategy formulation was constructed (...
Article
Full-text available
The strategic management field has derived many of its theoretical concepts from other social science disciplines including economics, psychology, and sociology. Industrial organization (IO) economics and the structure-conduct-performance paradigm, in particular, provided many of the building blocks upon which strategy formulation was constructed (...
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses the controversy between legal scholars and economists over allowing cooperation in markets that have empty core characteristics. An examination of the long-run social cost that may result from firms' actions to avoid empty core markets may be the persistence of small plants when larger, more efficient plants are technically f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Much of the current emphasis on entry barriers can be traced to Bain (1959) and Sylos-Labini (1962). These authors argue that there are three natural entry barriers: economies of scale, product differentiation, and absolute cost advantages (independent of scale). These barriers imply that above normal returns earned by firms in industries with thes...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
While the 2008 Oxford University Press Handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility continues to be an authoritative collection of research on the topics included, research in CSR has continued to develop in new directions. For example, important new directions include more “micro”-based research in social responsibility, additional studies of environmental social responsibility and sustainability, more research on “strategic” CSR, connections between social responsibility and entrepreneurship (e.g., “social entrepreneurship”), and improvements in methods and data analysis as the field matures. The burgeoning research in these new areas has created a need for a second Handbook, with a broader scope and current perspectives. This Handbook will deliver in these areas.