Aaron Sidder

Aaron Sidder
Bat Conservation International | BCI · Conservation

MS Ecology

About

91
Publications
5,009
Reads
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45
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - present
Bat Conservation International
Position
  • NEPA and ESA Compliance Specialist
June 2016 - August 2016
National Geographic Society
Position
  • Science Journalist
Education
August 2012 - August 2015
Colorado State University
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (91)
Article
Satellite imaging and remote sensing offer unique insights into the Amazon’s complex hydrology. A new review summarizes decades of findings and charts a path forward for new remote sensing missions.
Article
Tree throw from extreme wind events plays an important role in the movement of sediment and erosion on forested hillslopes. A new theory offers a novel way to measure its impact.
Article
Global methane budgets suffer from a lack of field studies in African forests, but new research sheds light on methane emissions and uptake from upland forests in the Congo Basin.
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A new study uses its data to show that diesel traffic is the largest source of pollution inequality across racial and economic divides
Article
New research finds that Actinobacteria in lava caves fix carbon and survive independent of surface inputs, offering a fresh perspective in the search for life beyond Earth.
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A new study looks into how air movement in the atmospheric boundary layer affects ozone removal by deciduous forests, which are a significant ozone sink.
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Severe wildfires strip away plant cover and reduce the soil’s ability to hold water. A new study develops a model to better understand landslide risk following a burn.
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A new study examines the relationship between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and dementia, finding that air pollution may be responsible for up to 2 million dementia cases each year.
Article
A new technique using dissolved noble gas tracers sheds light on how water moves through an aquifer, with implications for water resources and their vulnerability to climate change.
Article
NASA’s ICESat-2 satellite recorded the cleaving of a 315-billion-ton iceberg from Amery Ice Shelf in 2019, as well as years of subtle cracking and splitting prior to the calving event.
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A study of trends in wildfire occurrence over the past 30 years shows that environmental, climatic, and human-related factors can point out regions with high fire probabilities.
Article
Increased seawater exposure from flooding and storms is altering how coastal forests cycle methane, leading to more greenhouse gas accumulation in tree stems and soil.
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Fracturing during microearthquakes can cause groundwater pH drops. The change is temporary but can be equivalent to the difference between water and vinegar.
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Individual paleohurricane records extracted from the sediments of storm-battered islands do not clearly implicate climate as having shaped hurricane frequency over the past millennium.
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Researchers in Kentucky have merged results from home test kits with the state’s geologic map to produce a map of indoor radon potential based on the geology underlying homes in the state.
Article
Videos de Twitter y YouTube ayudaron a los cient�ficos a descubrir los mecanismos f�sicos que generaron el gran tsunami en Palu Bay despu�s de un terremoto de magnitud 7.5.
Article
Monetizing environmental services of biofuel feedstocks could incentivize farmers to take advantage of marginal agricultural lands while also benefiting the landscape.
Article
Precise measurements of the Earth’s vertical surface motion help to elucidate the hazards of faults in an earthquake-prone region.
Article
Many oceanic properties are not directly observed but are instead estimated using proxy measurements. A new method uses physics-based correlations to reduce uncertainty in this relationship.
Article
Rapid temperature spikes in the stratosphere above Antarctica can influence weather and spark cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere’s tropics.
Article
Largely spared from disruptive tectonic activity, the South African coastline offers a natural setting to study sea levels from when Earth’s atmospheric carbon dioxide last reached today’s levels.
Article
Handprint thinking, a concept developed about a decade ago, is meant to complement ecological footprints and frame human actions in terms of how much good they can do to promote sustainability.
Article
Videos from Twitter and YouTube helped scientists tease out the physical mechanisms that generated the large tsunami in Palu Bay after a magnitude 7.5 earthquake.
Article
Continental shelves and estuaries are natural sources of nitrous oxide, but current global estimates of these emissions carry a lot of uncertainty, a problem that calls for regional studies.
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The planetary boundaries framework defines how much human disturbance various Earth system processes can take, but it may not adequately depict the water cycle or the extent to which we’ve altered it.
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Signals in layers of sedimentary rock hint at climates and ecosystems come and gone. Understanding this history can help us forecast the future, but challenges abound.
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A new study uses the planetary boundaries concept to formulate an approach to water management that considers both global and local limits to water cycle modifications.
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Low-lying coastal estuaries are intertwined with tropical cities around the world. Yet little is known about these water bodies, which affect millions of people globally.
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Reforestation has been shown to cool surface temperatures, and a novel study suggests it may also reduce air temperature up to several stories above the ground.
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A new tool links nitrogen and phosphorus applications to land use classifications to better understand where and how much of the nutrients enter watersheds in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin.
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A theoretical study explores why small earthquake sources can produce quasiperiodic sequences of identical events, whereas earthquakes on large faults are intrinsically more variable.
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Climate models struggle to accurately portray clouds because the models cannot resolve the scales at which clouds form. A new study demonstrates a potential fix for the problem.
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An energized air-sea interface facilitates exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. A new study looks at the formation of sea spray, an important component of this exchange.
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The tule fog in California’s Central Valley is notorious for causing delays and accidents throughout the region; however, a decrease in air pollutants is reducing the fog’s frequency.
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A new study finds that magnetism in volcanic ash tuff forms through varied processes, calling into question previously reliable signatures used to study variations in Earth’s magnetic field.
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A new model will help climate models better interpret paleoclimate reconstructions derived from lake sediment and could improve predictions of future climatic conditions.
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A new model improves predictions for sediment movement in vegetated shoreline zones and reveals a universal predictor that could change the understanding of coastal landscape evolution.
Article
Although methane emission estimates from underground coal production appear to be accurate, the calculated emissions from natural gas production are underreported.
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A new study tracks how climatic factors like sea ice cover and ocean circulation affect the life span and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls in the world’s oceans.
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A new study unveils the increasing exposure of coastal communities to minor and extreme floods as sea levels rise.
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Students from around the country recently convened for the National Collegiate Soils Contest and promptly crawled into backhoe-scraped pits to dig into soil science.
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Large stones in streams provide crucial habitat for fish. Modeling the boulders and streamflow offers fresh insights into how water engineering projects alter aquatic habitats.
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When the blue dye resazurin encounters living microorganisms, it transforms into fluorescent pink resorufin and helps scientists understand ecosystem respiration, but it has its limitations.
Article
The first movie of Jupiter’s infrared aurora gives scientists a new look at the Jovian magnetic field.
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A new study offers novel insights into the mechanisms driving gas releases in agricultural regions.
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Using modern techniques, scientists tested an old hypothesis about carbonate mud production to shift the thinking about rocks that are used as seawater archives and a source of petroleum.
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A novel statistical approach demonstrates how to reduce bias in remote sensing estimates of soil moisture and latent heat flux coupling strength and clarifies the relationship between the variables.
Article
Infrared emissions from nitric oxide and carbon dioxide in Earth’s upper atmosphere, which are closely tied to incoming solar radiation, are drastically lower than in the previous solar cycle.
Article
Tree ring chronologies fill in gaps in the historical record and offer insights into the natural flow of China’s Yellow River.
Article
Particulate matter in the atmosphere derives from industrial and environmental sources. The size of the particle determines how it deposits in the body and leads to different health challenges.
Article
Sediments from the Curiosity rover and experiments using tanks of gas and laser beams helped reveal how water continued to flow on Mars after the planet lost its atmospheric carbon dioxide.
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Evapotranspiration is the exchange of water vapor between land and the atmosphere, and it is hard to measure and model. A new study shows promise for its estimation over large, vegetated landscapes.
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Wizened bristlecone pines in California reveal past climate trends, and new research shows how slight variations in landscape position drive different growth patterns in trees’ annual rings.
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Cities can reduce surface runoff and increase groundwater recharge by encouraging their residents to implement simple, hydrologic modifications on individual buildings and single-family parcels.
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Hydrated minerals on near-Earth asteroids offer both scientific revelations and economic incentives for companies looking to refuel satellites with material from nearby space.
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A new study rebuffs the standard approach to paleomagnetism and offers an updated methodology and new locations of paleomagnetic poles.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are a vital tool for conservation. For many conservation organizations around Colorado (USA), GIS remains underutilized because of limited technical know-how and restrictive budgets that prevent the addition of GIS-centric staff and software. This report included conversations with conservation stakeholders thro...
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A new study examines how unusual meteorology interacted with topography and other local conditions to generate some of the most devastating floods in American history.
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A new algorithm incorporates randomness into stream channel formation and suggests the approach represents regions with variable flood magnitudes better than standard models.
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A review of streamflow uncertainty estimation methods reveals that one method does not fit all situations and provides recommendations for how to improve streamflow estimates.
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Researchers apply a radio holographic method to standard Venusian atmospheric data, resulting in outputs with finer vertical resolution and revealing small-scale atmospheric structures.
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Dissolved thorium isotopes light the way to a more thorough understanding of how different elements enter marine environments—and how long they stay there.
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Information is lost when researchers combine statistical models and remote sensing data, but just how much is often unclear. A new study offers a framework to measure the inefficiency.
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Dissolved organic carbon receives much of the focus in aquatic research, but a new study suggests that bulkier particulate matter may play a significant role in regulating carbon dioxide emissions.
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A new study identifies possible precursors to space weather in the regions encircling sunspots.
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A 400,000-year calcium carbonate record from the ocean floor sheds light on deep-ocean circulation and on mechanisms driving climate patterns and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.
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A new study in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area reveals prior estimates may significantly underrepresent methane emissions, particularly from landfills and natural gas systems.
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Nitrogen released into the soil from thawing permafrost in the Arctic could accelerate soil carbon decomposition and alter carbon dynamics, with global implications.
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As spring snowmelt and fall rains inundate northern hardwood forests with moisture, soil bacteria get moving and increase carbon exports to the atmosphere and into nearby water bodies.
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Palm oil is in demand, and its agricultural footprint is expanding in the tropics. New research suggests that habitat buffers could improve conservation and prevent erosion that cuts into economic returns.
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Dissolved organic matter in the oceans absorbs light near the water’s surface, leading to cooler waters that may help mitigate regional climate warming.
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Brackish wetlands and their salt-tolerant vegetation are significant methyl halide emitters. The natural emissions add chlorine and bromine to the stratosphere, which break down ozone.
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A new approach offers insights into the relationship between surface temperature and top-of-atmosphere energy imbalances and improves the understanding of important climate feedbacks.
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A hemlock woolly adelgid outbreak in southern Appalachia prompted a transformation in where the forest stores carbon.
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The golden mussel has spread quickly in the 30 years since its arrival in South America and is transforming aquatic ecosystems in waterways across the continent.
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New England lakes weathered years of acid rain. A new study tracks how they are faring after 30 years of regulation and how climate change factors into the equation.
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A new study shows that mesquites employ hydraulic redistribution to move water between soil layers in the savannas of Santa Rita.
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Inland from the seagrass and salt marsh ecosystems that border the ocean, upper estuaries store more carbon than previously realized and could play an important role in mitigating climate change.
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The Korean Peninsula’s rich geologic history can be traced on the slopes of the alpine ski course.
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A new report reveals that increasing numbers of women are studying and working in the geosciences, but the field continues to lag in attracting underrepresented groups.
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ENCONTRAR fósiles de dinosau-rios en Cuba sería una sorpresa rara, pero no imposible, si se piensa que las rocas donde apa-recen los fósiles jurásicos en la Isla se formaron en su mayoría en un ambiente marino durante la Edad de los dinosaurios. Además, fósiles de plantas terrestres y algunos huesos ocasionales muestran clara-mente que vestigios de...
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An advocacy group for women scientists has formed in reaction to the contentious 2016 U.S. presidential campaign and expects to participate in the Women's March on Washington this weekend.
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With their feet in the cloud, Descartes Labs is pushing the limit of how we study the Earth with satellite images.
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A new climate change app uses interactive data maps to engage users and prompt the exploration of questions related to changing sea levels and climate vulnerability.
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For the first time, new research examines the response of terrestrial soil microbes to a massive natural gas blowout and offers hope for new remediation strategies.
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From ominous deadlines to Internet trolls, AGU's 2016 AAAS Mass Media Fellow recounts his experience writing for National Geographic as a science journalist.
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The Wolfcamp shale, which underlies a large swath of Texas roughly centered on the city of Midland, contains 20 billion barrels of oil that could be recovered with current technology.
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Combining satellite precipitation measurements and remotely sensed environmental data, a new system aims to improve landslide awareness and preparedness in all corners of the globe.
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Two scientific communities that evolved separately for more than 50 years reunited last week to share their findings and plan a more unified future.
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Over the last decade, western North America has experienced the largest mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in recorded history, and Rocky Mountain forests have been severely impacted. Although bark beetles are indigenous to North American forests, climate change has facilitated the beetle's expansion into previously uns...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The study included conversations with conservation stakeholders throughout Colorado, a GIS survey sent to conservation entities in Colorado, and pilot projects with two land trusts designed to explore the possibilities and challenges of a shared services program.
Project
Published articles for Eos and Eos.org, a publication of the American Geophysical Union.
Archived project
Over the last decade, western North America has experienced the largest mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in recorded history, and Rocky Mountain forests have been severely impacted. Although bark beetles are indigenous to North American forests, climate change has facilitated the beetle's expansion into previously unsuitable habitats. We used three correlative niche models (maximum entropy [MaxEnt], boosted regression trees, and generalized linear models) to estimate (1) the current potential distribution of the beetle in the U.S. Rocky Mountain region, (2) how this distribution has changed since historical outbreaks in the 1960s and 1970s, and (3) how the distribution may be expected to change under future climate scenarios. Additionally, we evaluated the temporal transferability of the niche models by forecasting historical models and testing the model predictions using temporally independent outbreak data from the current outbreak. Our results indicated that there has been a significant expansion of climatically suitable habitat over the past 50 yr and that much of this expansion corresponds with an upward shift in elevation across the study area. Furthermore, our models indicated that drought was a more prominent driver of current outbreak than temperature, which suggests a change in the climatic signature between historical and current outbreaks. Projections under future conditions suggest that there will be a large reduction in climatically suitable habitat for the beetle and that high-elevation forests will continue to become more susceptible to outbreak. While all three models generated reasonable predictions, the generalized linear model correctly predicted a higher percentage of current outbreak localities when trained on historical data. Our findings suggest that researchers aiming to reduce omission error in estimates of future species responses may have greater predictive success with simpler, generalized models.