Aaron Corcoran

Aaron Corcoran
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | UNC · Department of Biology

PhD (Biology) Wake Forest University

About

24
Publications
12,864
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622
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
Wake Forest University
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Although bateinsect interactions are often described as an 'evolutionary arms race', conclusive evidence for bat counterstrategies to insect defences has been difficult to acquire. Previous studies have indicated that some bats use low-amplitude, 'stealth' echolocation to counter moth hearing. However, actual bateinsect interactions have not been d...
Article
Full-text available
What determines whether fleeing prey escape from attacking predators? To answer this question, biologists have developed mathematical models that incorporate attack geometries, pursuit and escape trajectories, and kinematics of predator and prey. These models have rarely been tested using data from actual predator-prey encounters. To address this p...
Article
Full-text available
Communication signals are susceptible to interference ("jamming") from conspecifics and other sources. Many active sensing animals, including bats and electric fish, alter the frequency of their emissions to avoid inadvertent jamming from conspecifics. We demonstrated that echolocating bats adaptively jam conspecifics during competitions for food....
Article
Full-text available
The intimate details regarding the coevolution of bats and moths have been elucidated over the past 50 years. The bat-moth story began with the evolution of bat sonar, an exquisite ultrasonic system for tracking prey through the night sky. Moths countered with ears tuned to the high frequencies of bat echolocation and with evasive action through di...
Article
Full-text available
In response to sonar-guided attacking bats, some tiger moths make ultrasonic clicks of their own. The lepidopteran sounds have previously been shown to alert bats to some moths' toxic chemistry and also to startle bats unaccustomed to sonic prey. The moth sounds could also interfere with, or "jam," bat sonar, but evidence for such jamming has been...
Article
Full-text available
Organisms compete for food in many ways, but it is often difficult to know why they use certain competition strategies over others. Bats compete for food either through aggression coupled with food-claiming signals or by actively interfering with a competitor’s sensory processing during prey pursuit (i.e., jamming). It is not known why these differ...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are renowned for their sophisticated echolocation. However, recent research has indicated that bats may be less reliant on echolocation than has long been assumed. To test the hypothesis that bats reduce their use of echolocation to avoid eavesdropping by conspecifics, we deployed miniature tags that recorded ultrasound and accelerations on 10...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tracking animal movement patterns using videography is an important tool in many biological disciplines ranging from biomechanics to conservation. Reduced costs of technology such as thermal videography and unmanned aerial vehicles has made video-based animal tracking more accessible, however existing software for processing acquired video limits t...
Article
Chimney swifts (Chaetura pelagica) are highly aerial, small, insectivorous birds well known for roosting en masse in chimneys during their autumn migration. These roosting events require hundreds to thousands of birds to enter a small opening (here 0.64 m<sup>2</sup>) within a short amount of time (15 - 30 minutes). Thus, these entry events pose a...
Article
Full-text available
Animal groups have emergent properties that result from simple interactions among individuals. However, we know little about why animals adopt different interaction rules because of sparse sampling among species. Here, we identify an interaction rule that holds across single and mixed-species flocks of four migratory shorebird species spanning a se...
Article
Full-text available
Pursuit is a common behavior exhibited by animals chasing prey, competitors and potential mates. Because of their speed and maneuverability, dragonflies are frequently studied as a model system for biological pursuit. Most quantitative studies have focused on prey pursuits in captive environments. To determine whether a different pursuit strategy i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animal groups have emergent properties that result from simple interactions among individuals. However, we know little about why animals adopt different interaction rules because of sparse sampling among species. Here, we identify an interaction rule that holds across single and mixed-species flocks of four migratory shorebird species spanning a se...
Article
Full-text available
Echolocation allows bats to occupy diverse nocturnal niches. Bats almost always use echolocation, even when other sensory stimuli are available to guide navigation. Here, using arrays of calibrated infrared cameras and ultrasonic microphones, we demonstrate that hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) use previously unknown echolocation behaviours that chal...
Article
Full-text available
All animals face the essential task of extracting biologically meaningful sensory information from the 'noisy' backdrop of their environments. Here, we examine mechanisms used by echolocating bats to localize objects, track small prey and communicate in complex and noisy acoustic environments. Bats actively control and coordinate both the emission...
Article
Full-text available
Energetic cost can constrain how frequently animals exhibit behaviors. The energetic cost of acoustic signaling for communication has been the subject of numerous studies; however, the cost of acoustic signaling for predator defense has not been addressed. We studied the energetic cost and efficiency of sound production for the clicks produced by t...
Article
Full-text available
Bats and their insect prey rely on acoustic sensing in predator prey encounters-echolocation in bats, tympanic hearing in moths. Some insects also emit sounds for bat defense. Here, we describe a previously unknown sound-producing organ in Geometrid moths-a prothoracic tymbal in the orange beggar moth (Eubaphe unicolor) that generates bursts of ult...
Article
We here describe field experiments testing whether bats adaptively produce sounds to interfere with ("jam") the echolocation of other bats. Visual observations, low-light videography, and ultrasound recording with microphone arrays allowing reconstruction of bat flight paths were used to document interactions between Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadar...
Article
Full-text available
Nearly all animals face a tradeoff between seeking food and mates and avoiding predation. Optimal escape theory holds that an animal confronted with a predator should only flee when benefits of flight (increased survival) outweigh the costs (energetic costs, lost foraging time, etc.). We propose a model for prey risk assessment based on the predato...
Article
Full-text available
Bats and insects provide a model system for integrating our understanding of predator-prey ecology, animal behavior and neurophysiology. Previous field studies of bat-insect interactions have been limited by the technological challenges involved with studying nocturnal, volant animals that use ultrasound and engage in battles that frequently last a...
Article
Full-text available
The tiger moth Bertholdia trigona is the only animal in nature known to defend itself by jamming the sonar of its predators - bats. In this study we analyzed the three-dimensional flight paths and echolocation behavior of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) attacking B. trigona in a flight room over seven consecutive nights to determine the acoustic...
Article
Full-text available
The night sky is the venue of an ancient acoustic battle between echolocating bats and their insect prey. Many tiger moths (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) answer the attack calls of bats with a barrage of high frequency clicks. Some moth species use these clicks for acoustic aposematism and mimicry, and others for sonar jamming, however, most of the work...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC IDENTIFICATION OF NINE BAT SPECIES OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

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