Aaron Bauer

Aaron Bauer
Villanova University | Nova · Department of Biology

About

30
Publications
15,255
Reads
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204
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
199 Citations
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (30)
Chapter
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This chapter reviews current knowledge on the diversity of terrestrial reptiles in the Gulf of Guinea oceanic islands and provides a brief history of research on this group of animals. A total of 29 species of terrestrial reptiles (representing 14 genera and seven families) are resident on the Gulf of Guinea oceanic islands, of which 22 species are...
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The genus Heliobolus comprises four recognized species, all endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Of these, only Heliobolus lugubrisoccurs in southern Africa, its distribution extending from Angola in the west to Mozambique in the east and reaching as far south as parts of northern South Africa. Like many of the reptile species that occur in southern Afri...
Article
This third report of activities of the Linz Zoocode Committee provides comments and proposals regarding the concepts, terminology and Rules used to establish the nomenclatural availability of publications, whatever their support and mode of distribution (on paper, on discs or electronic).
Article
Full-text available
This second report of activities of the Linz Zoocode Committee is devoted to a careful analysis of the concept of nomenclatural availability in zoological nomenclature, a concept often misunderstood and misused in recent taxonomic publications. It provides a definition of this expression and establishes a new nomenclatural principle, the Principle...
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We describe a new species of the agamid genus Acanthocercus from Namibia and Angola, based on morphological and molecular evidence. The phylogenetic analysis of a fragment of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene suggests that the new species is closely related to the other taxa from southern Africa and is distinct from species from eastern and northeast...
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The herpetological collections of the Museu do Dundo in Lunda Norte Province, northeast Angola, are among the most important in southern Africa and represent one of the largest collections of Angolan amphibians and reptiles in the world. The collection comprises more than 2,750 preserved specimens, including type specimens of taxa described by Raym...
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The New Zealand diplodactylid gecko genus Toropuku is currently monotypic, but the sole member of the genus, T. stephensi, is distributed in two disjunct, geographically distant regions of New Zealand – the islands of Cook Strait (which includes the type locality, Stephens Island), between New Zealand’s North and South Islands, and the Coromandel P...
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The reptile fauna of Tinhosa Grande islet, Gulf of Guinea, comprises an endemic skink, Trachylepis adamastor, and an unidentified species of gecko of the genus Hemidactylus. Until recently, no molecular data were available for either species, impeding their phylogenetic placement. However, due to several synapomorphic characters, it was suggested t...
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Recent molecular phylogenetic work has found that Breviceps Merrem, 1820 comprises two major clades, one of which, the B. mossambicus group, is widely distributed across southern sub-Saharan Africa. This group is notable for harboring abundant cryptic diversity. Of the four most recently described Breviceps species, three are members of this group,...
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A correction to the recent revision of the genus Hemidactylus Goldfuss, 1820 from Angola is presented. The previous revision assigned some historical specimens to H. bayonii and H. nzingae, with one specimen even being considered a paratype of the latter taxon. A review of the morphological data of all of the specimens used in the previous study fo...
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At present the genus Lygodactylus is represented by three species in Angola confirmed by voucher specimens-L. angolensis, L. bradfieldi, and L. capensis-and two others believed to be present, but without specimens with precise localities, L. chobiensis and L. lawrencei. We present a detailed taxonomic revision of the group in Angola and describe th...
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Two species of Bush Vipers, genus Atheris Cope, 1862, have been reported for the continental island of Bioko, Gulf of Guinea-Atheris squamigera and a putatively undescribed species, morphologically similar to Atheris chlorechis. The latter was only known from one specimen collected in the early 1900s and its taxonomic identity has never been fully...
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The Angolan Adder, Bitis heraldica (Bocage, 1889), is endemic to the Angolan central plateau and is one of the most poorly known and rarely observed species of African snakes. The phylogenetic placement of B. heraldica within the four subgenera of the genus Bitis (Bitis, Macrocerastes, Calechidna, Keniabitis) has been problematic. The few recent ta...
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The genus Panaspis in Angola is represented by four species, most of them part of taxonomically and nomenclaturally challenging species-complexes. We present a taxonomic revision of the group in the region and describe one new species, Panaspis mocamedensis sp. nov., endemic to the lowland areas of the Namibe province, southwestern Angola. Phylogen...
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The genus Hemidactylus in Angola is represented by six species, all of them part of taxonomically and nomenclaturally challenging species complexes. We present a detailed taxonomic revision of the group in the region and describe two new species, Hemidactylus nzingae sp. nov. and Hemidactylus paivae sp. nov., both occuring in and potentially endemi...
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Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are relatively unknown in terms of their herpetological diversity. Based on specimens collected in the Congolese region of the Katanga and the northeast of Angola during the first decades of the twentieth century, de Witte and Laurent independently suggested, based on morphological and coloration diff...
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A recent molecular revision of the snake-eyed skinks of the genus Panaspis Cope, 1868 uncovered extensive cryptic diversity within the P. wahlbergi (Smith, 1849) and P. maculicollis Jacobsen & Broadley, 2000 species complexes. We here describe an unnamed central and northern Namibian lineage of the P. maculicollis group as a new species. We base th...
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The present work constitutes an historical atlas of all known bibliographic records of amphibians and reptiles of Angola. It is the first attempt to compile in a single document all the records scattered through hundreds of publications, published from the first half of the nineteenth century to the present day, and provide a critical taxonomic rev...
Article
Full-text available
The geckos in the genus Strophurus (Diplodactylidae) are one of only two squamate lineages with specialized caudal defensive glands. Many species in this genus also have distinctive caudal ornamentation combined with bright and/or contrasting colour pattern elements on the iris, tail and especially the lining of the mouth that are hypothesized to b...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Papers and other documents related to the study of the amphibians and reptiles of the Gulf of Guinea Islands of São Tomé, Principe, Bioko and Annobon.
Project
The Observatory on Availability in Zoological Nomenclature was established in June 2016 by an international group of zootaxonomists, as an outcome of the International Workshop of Zoological Nomenclature held in Linz (Austria) in July 2014 (see Dumerilia, 2016, 6; accessible at <http://dumerilia.wifeo.com/>). This workshop supported the statement of Dubois et al. (2013, Zootaxa, 3735) that the Amendment to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature “to expand and refined methods of publication” published in 2012 (Zootaxa, 3450) raised serious nomenclatural problems, especially regarding the online publication of new scientific names (nomina) and nomenclatural acts. The first aim of the Observatory is to identify (mostly recent) publications where the Rules of the Code for nomenclatural availability (and particularly those of the 2012 Amendment) were ignored or misinterpreted, resulting in the publication of nomenclatural novelties (nomina and acts) that are nomenclaturally unavailable and must be either ignored by zootaxonomists or corrected in new publications. In the absence of such published corrections, the nomina at stake should not being used as valid in scientific communication. Through its action, the Observatory intends to raise awareness on these problems among the community of zootaxonomists, to facilitate the correction of these errors and to avoid or limit their repetition, particularly in proposing changes to the current Code. In all cases of discovery of such nomenclatural problems, the action of the Observatory will be constructive and collaborative. It will include three steps: [1] warning of the author(s) about the nomenclatural problem(s) raised by their original publication; [2] proposal to publish a paper correcting the problem(s) in the next issue of the journal Dumerilia or elsewhere; [3] if no positive reply is given to this proposal within two months, publication of a notice of the case in Dumerilia. It is important to note that, even if our Observatory did not raise the case, it is extremely likely that, sooner or later, it would be discovered and corrected by the community of zootaxonomists, as it has nearly always been the case during the history of zoological nomenclature—but, the later nomenclatural mistakes are discovered, the more this may have a disrupting effect on nomenclatural stability and, by way of consequence, on appropriate communication about living organisms within the international scientific community. All zoologists interested in zoological nomenclature and aware of the nomenclatural problems raised by electronic publications, are welcome to join the Observatory in order to contribute to the identification of recent publications failing to respect the Rules of the Code for nomenclatural availability and to the solving of these problems. Alain Dubois Emeritus Professor Paris Museum of Natural History <sapo421@gmail.com> 3 November 2016