A. B. Gill

A. B. Gill
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science | CEFAS · Division of Environment and Ecosystems

PhD

About

87
Publications
35,514
Reads
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3,780
Citations
Citations since 2016
41 Research Items
2139 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - January 2017
Cranfield University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2003 - September 2010
Cranfield University
Position
  • Lecturer
December 1996 - December 2003
University of Liverpool
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (87)
Article
Full-text available
Offshore wind infrastructure modifies benthic habitats, affecting ecosystem services. A natural capital approach allows risks to nature-based assets and ecosystem benefits to be assessed. The UK Natural Capital Committee produced guidance for conducting natural capital assessments to aid decision making processes. Development of an asset register a...
Article
Full-text available
Measurement of particle motion from an offshore piling event in the North was conducted to determine noise levels. For this purpose, a bespoken sensor was developed that was both autonomous and sensitive up to 2 kHz. The measurement was undertaken both for unmitigated and mitigated piling. Three different types of mitigation techniques were employe...
Article
Full-text available
The marine environment is a complex system, and with growing human demand, the sustainable use of multiple marine resources is continually challenged. The increasing complexity of overlapping marine activities causes pressures on the environment. Here, we review the fundamental aspects for effective marine management, particularly the role of scien...
Article
Full-text available
Nature-based solutions are widely advocated for freshwater ecosystem conservation and restoration. As increasing amounts of river restoration are undertaken, the need to understand the ecological response to different measures and where measures are best applied becomes more pressing. It is essential that appraisal methods follow a sound scientific...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The aim of the Working Group on Marine Benthal and Renewable Energy Developments (WGMBRED) is to increase scientific exchange and efficiency of benthal renewable energy related research. In 2019–2021, the group discussed guidelines for data collection and methodologies and developed an integrated example dataset on benthos data of marine renewable...
Article
The expanding marine renewable energy industry will increase the prevalence of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from power cables in coastal waters. Assessments of environmental impacts are required within licensing/permitting processes and increased prevalence of cables will increase questions concerning EMF emissions and potential cumulative impacts...
Article
Full-text available
States in the Northeast United States have the ambitious goal of producing more than 22 GW of offshore wind energy in the coming decades. The infrastructure associated with offshore wind energy development is expected to modify marine habitats and potentially alter the ecosystem services. Species distribution models were constructed for a group of...
Article
Full-text available
Changes to fisheries that result from offshore wind farm (OWF) installations may be considered good or bad depending on various stakeholders' perspectives. OWFs can act as artificial reefs that may benefit secondary fish production, but such effects may also have ecological consequences. The fisheries exclusion effect that turns some OWFs into no-g...
Article
Full-text available
p>Changes to fisheries that result from offshore wind farm (OWF) installations may be considered good or bad depending on various stakeholders’ perspectives. OWFs can act as artificial reefs that may benefit secondary fish production, but such effects may also have ecological consequences. The fisheries exclusion effect that turns some OWFs into no...
Article
Full-text available
As offshore wind energy production increases, the number of subsea cables will proliferate along with associated electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions. Understanding how EMF interactions (a potential pressure) affect resource species (receptor) requires an improved knowledge base to aid management decisions. Within the framework of a potential effe...
Chapter
The OES-Environmental 2020 State of the Science Report: Environmental Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Development Around the World builds on and serves as an update and a complement to the 2013 Final Report for Phase 1 of OES-Environmental and the 2016 State of the Science Report. Its content reflects the most current and pertinent published inf...
Article
Full-text available
Many marine animals have evolved sensory abilities to use electric and magnetic cues in essential aspects of life history, such as to detect prey, predators and mates as well as to orientate and migrate. Potential disruption of vital cues by human activities must be understood in order to mitigate potential negative influences. Cable deployments in...
Article
Full-text available
Connectivity of marine populations and ecosystems is crucial to maintaining and enhancing their structure, distribution, persistence, resilience and productivity. Artificial hard substrate, such as that associated with oil and gas platforms, provides settlement opportunities for species adapted to hard substrates in areas of soft sediment. The cont...
Article
Full-text available
Electroreception in marine fishes occurs across a variety of taxa and is best known in chondrichthyans. Here, we present an up‐to‐date review of what is known about the biology of passive electroreception and considered how this knowledge can assist in understanding the ecological consequences of responding to electric and magnetic stimuli by elect...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides an overview of the state of affairs (1) with regards to the deployment of wet renewables and (2) marine energy storage systems; (3) how they affect abiotic and biotic compo-nents of the marine ecosystem and (4) developments and concepts on cumulative impact assess-ments related to marine renewable energy devices and (5) future...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides an overview of the state of affairs (1) with regards to the deployment of wet renewables and (2) marine energy storage systems; (3) how they affect abiotic and biotic compo-nents of the marine ecosystem and (4) developments and concepts on cumulative impact assess-ments related to marine renewable energy devices and (5) future...
Article
As the EU's commitment to renewable energy is projected to grow to 20% of energy generation by 2020, the use of marine renewable energy from wind, wave and tidal resources is increasing. This literature review (233 studies) (i) summarizes knowledge on how marine renewable energy devices affect benthic environments, (ii) explains how these effects c...
Article
Full-text available
The growing awareness of climate change and the recognised need to secure energy production has been a driving force behind the expansion of the offshore wind industry across the world. Benefits from offshore wind farms (OWFs) may extend further than low CO 2 energy production. Wind turbine substructures introduce hard surfaces that are rapidly col...
Article
Cumulative effects assessments are a legal requirement in many jurisdictions and are key to informing marine policy. However, practice does not yet deliver fit-for-purpose assessments relative to sustainable development and environmental protection obligations. The complexity of cumulative effect questions, which are embedded in complex social-ecol...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In 2014, The University of Rhode Island and key partners were contracted by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to conduct a two-year study entitled "Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Impacts on Elasmobranch (sharks, rays, and skates) and American Lobster Movement and Migration from Direct Current Cables." The BOEM-URI project had five major com...
Article
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Deforestation significantly impacts large carnivores that depend on large tracts of interconnected forest habitat and that are sensitive to human activities. Understanding the relationship between habitat use and spatial distribution of such species across human modified landscapes is critical when planning effective conservation strategies. This s...
Article
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Proponents of marine renewable energy worldwide highlight that regulatory and consenting procedures are a significant barrier to the upscaling of infrastructure required to transform the energy generation sector. Uncertainties about the cumulative effects of marine renewable energy developments cause substantial delays during the consenting process...
Article
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Marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) are rapidly expanding in size and number as society strives to maintain electricity generation whilst simultaneously reducing climate-change linked CO2 emissions. MREDs are part of an ongoing large-scale modification of coastal waters that also includes activities such as commercial fishing, shipping, ag...
Chapter
Concurrent with the development of wind energy, research activity on wind energy generation and wildlife has evolved significantly during the last decade. This chapter presents an overview of remaining key knowledge gaps, consequent future research directions and their significance for management and planning for wind energy generation. The impacts...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing and managing the cumulative impacts of human activities on the environment remains a major challenge to sustainable development. This challenge is highlighted by the worldwide expansion of marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) in areas already subject to multiple activities and climate change. Cumulative effects assessments in theo...
Poster
The MaRVEN project has provided a dedicated risk modelling study conducted in order to address the gap identified in various noise impact assessments that have been undertaken at specific sites across Marine Renewable Energy (MRE) projects in EU waters, specifically from the point of view of detectability of the noise by marine life.
Poster
Full-text available
It has been shown that pile-driving sound for offshore wind farm foundations can affect harbor porpoises and harbor seals at considerable distances from the source. As pile driving reaches comparably high sound pressure levels at mainly low frequencies, there is also a high potential to affect low-frequency cetaceans such as baleen whales as well....
Article
Full-text available
Tropical freshwater fish communities are increasingly under threat from anthropogenic pressures, particularly alteration to the hydrological regime (e.g. via deforestation and mining within the watershed and in-stream impoundments) which defines the extent and characteristics of in-channel and floodplain habitats for fishes. The ecological conseque...
Article
Non-consumptive effects of predators can have important impacts on aquatic food webs, but there are few data on how predators change the behaviour of Caribbean reef fishes. Such changes may include behavioural responses to the invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles). This study used an aquarium experiment to examine the behaviour of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report summarizes the state of the science of interactions and effects of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices on the marine environment, the animals that live there, and the habitats that support them. This report was produced by the Annex IV Initiative, under the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) collaboration. Thirteen OES countries have joined t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The construction and operation of marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) will lead to, among other things, the emission of electromagnetic fields (EMF), underwater sound, and vibrations into the marine environment. Knowledge on these pressures and associated effects has been increasing over the past decade. Yet, many open questions with regar...
Article
Predator avoidance is fundamental for survival and it can be particularly challenging for prey animals if physical movement away from a predatory threat is restricted. Many sharks and rays begin life within an egg capsule that is attached to the sea bed. The vulnerability of this sedentary life stage is exacerbated in skates (Rajidae) as the compul...
Article
Full-text available
Over a decade of monitoring offshore wind park environmental impact triggered a reflection on the overall objectives and how to best continue with the monitoring programmes. Essentially, basic monitoring has to be rationalised at the level of the likelihood of impact detection, the meaningfulness of impact size and representativeness of the finding...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The third annual meeting of the working group on Marine Benthal and Renewable Ener- gy developments was attended by 15 experts, representing seven countries (Belgium, Estonia, France, Germany, United Kingdom (England and Scotland) and the Nether- lands; with remote input from Poland and Sweden) and was held on 21–25 April 2015 in Oban, Scotland/U...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 2014 annual meeting of the Working Group on Marine Benthal and Renewable Energy developments was attended by 19 experts, representing nine countries (Bel- gium, Estonia, France, Germany, Ireland, Poland, Sweden, United Kingdom, Nether- lands) and was held in Tallinn, Estonia during March. The meeting was co-chaired by Jennifer Dannheim (Alfre...
Chapter
In the marine environment there are natural magnetic and electric fields associated with both physical and biological sources, and there are anthropogenic electromagnetic fields (EMFs) that permeate it. Many marine animals can detect electric and magnetic fields and utilize them in such important life processes as movement, orientation and foraging...
Article
Full-text available
Top predators inhabiting a dynamic environment, such as coastal waters, should theoretically possess sufficient cognitive ability to allow successful foraging despite unpredictable sensory stimuli. The cognition-related hunting abilities of marine mammals have been widely demonstrated. Having been historically underestimated, teleost cognitive abil...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Current and future biodiversity management requires understanding properly its status and to that end information availability is of vital importance. In Bolivia, significant research has documented its extensive biological resources. However, major challenges exist for the assimilation, spatial interpretation and dissemination of the data, as well...
Article
The considerable extent of construction and operation of marine renewable energy developments (MRED) within U.K. and adjacent waters will lead, among other things, to the emission of electromagnetic fields (EMF) and subsea sounds into the marine environment. Migratory fishes that respond to natural environmental cues, such as the Earth's geomagneti...
Article
Studies on the effects of offshore wind farm construction on marine life have focused on behavioral reactions in porpoises and seals (Thomsen et al. 2006). The effects on fish have only very recently come into the focus of scientists, regulators, and stakeholders (Popper and Hastings 2009). Pile-driving noise during construction is of particular co...
Article
There is an urgent need to obtain information on the effects of underwater sound on marine fish due to imminent policy drivers, e.g., the European Union Marine Strategy Framework Directive, on one hand and the increasingly noisy activities in the marine environment on the other. Yet studying the influence of sound, particularly on the behavior of f...
Chapter
This chapter aims to provide a review of what we currently understand about human interaction with coastal and estuarine renewable energy resources and highlight where we have made progress by thinking from an ecosystem perspective. It also highlights where we have gaps that need to be filled before we start on the road to a new era in industrial e...
Article
The effects of environmental warming on aquatic poikilotherms, such as fish, are likely to be manifest during periods of high metabolic demand. For species that invest heavily in parental-care, such as the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L., their reproductive success may be adversely affected. In two separate experiments with temp...
Article
Full-text available
To investigate the ability of elasmobranchs to distinguish between differing prey-type electric fields we examined the electroreceptive foraging behaviour of a model species, Scyliorhinus canicula (small-spotted catshark). Catshark preferences were studied by behaviourally conditioning them to swim through narrow tunnels, and on exit presenting the...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter aims to provide a review of what we currently understand about human interaction with coastal and estuarine renewable energy resources and highlight where we have made progress by thinking from an ecosystem perspective. It also highlights where we have gaps that need to be filled before we start on the road to a new era in industrial e...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of anthropogenic underwater sound on fish has become an important environmental issue. Pile-driving noise during construction is of particular concern as the very high sound pressure levels could potentially prevent fish from reaching breeding or spawning sites, finding food, and acoustically locating mates. This could result in long-ter...
Article
Full-text available
Marine renewable energy promises to assist in the effort to reduce carbon emissions worldwide. As with any large-scale development in the marine environment, however, it comes with uncertainty about potential environmental impacts, most of which have not been adequately evaluated—in part because many of the devices have yet to be deployed and teste...
Article
To examine potential effects of male–female interactions on the sexes' foraging behaviour, we studied equal-sized, single- and mixed-sex groups of a benthic elasmobranch, the small-spotted catshark, in response to electric stimuli. A total of 88 size-matched, adult individuals were repeatedly presented with a range of artificial, prey type electric...