Discussion
Started 11th Aug, 2023
  • Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw 🏛️

Will the beginning global climate catastrophe also generate a global biodiversity catastrophe?

In your opinion, will an incipient global climate catastrophe also generate a global biodiversity catastrophe and, therefore, should the two catastrophes be studied simultaneously as closely related?
Increasingly, future global climate catastrophe is being combined with global biodiversity catastrophe in scientific deliberations. Still high civilization's greenhouse gas emissions are causing global warming to accelerate. If nothing changes in this regard, according to the predictions of climatologists, climate geophysicists, ecologists, researchers operating in interdisciplinary areas, etc., in a few decades planet Earth will face a global climate catastrophe, which will result, among other things, in a many times higher frequency and scale of emerging periods of severe drought, heat, forest fires, etc., which will result in the impossibility of human existence on most of the planet's land areas. This will be associated with lack of water, permanently breaking out fires, inability to grow crops, etc. In addition, in these areas, the level of biodiversity of natural ecosystems will decline many times over. To a large extent, most of the planet's biosphere will be affected. The scale of the ongoing mass extinction of many species of flora and fauna, the scale of the current great 6 species extinctions (6 within the history of life on Earth) will increase many times over. The biodiversity of the planet will decrease many times over, that is, what has evolved for hundreds of millions of years as part of the evolution of life on Earth, man will destroy in a relatively short period of a few centuries at most (counting from the period of the first industrial revolution). Therefore, the results of many scientific studies already support the thesis that a global climate catastrophe will also generate a global biodiversity catastrophe, and therefore the two catastrophes should be studied simultaneously as closely related. Do you agree with this thesis? Whether you agree or not then please provide substantive arguments, studies, publications.
In view of the above, I address the following question to the esteemed community of scientists and researchers:
In your opinion, will the beginning global climate catastrophe also generate a global biodiversity catastrophe and, therefore, should the two catastrophes be studied simultaneously as closely related?
Will the beginning global climate catastrophe also generate a global biodiversity catastrophe?
What do you think about this topic?
What is your opinion on this issue?
Please answer,
I invite you all to join the discussion,
Thank you very much,
Best wishes,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
Counting on your opinions, on getting to know your personal opinion, on a fair approach to the discussion of scientific issues, I deliberately used the phrase "in your opinion" in the question.
The above text is entirely my own work written by me on the basis of my research.
In writing this text I did not use other sources or automatic text generation systems.
Copyright by Dariusz Prokopowicz

Most recent answer

Jamel Chahed
University of Tunis El Manar
On Earth Energy Budget. The energy transfers within the earth interfaces, analyzed by Woodcock, indicate that the associated budget of CO2 or Vapor in the atmosphere if increased vis-à-vis a reference state, should be accompanied by a relative cooling effect. IMHO, these results are incomplete, not because they are discordant with what is admitted as "consensus", but because these come under the "two-by-two separate parameters analysis" fundamentally unsuitable to tackle all nonlinear interactions involved in Climate determinants.
However and quite surprisingly, Woodcock's results, compared with the data, succeeded in explaining the temperature anomalies observed in different regions of the planet, not only by reference to fracking but also by other considerations; among them the various elements of the natural and anthropic carbon cycle
[1] Woodcock, L. V. (2022). Global Warming by Geothermal Heat from Fracking: Energy Industry’s Enthalpy Footprints. Entropy, 24(9), 1316.
Available on:
1 Recommendation

Popular replies (1)

Sundus F Hantoosh
Forensic DNA Center for Research and Training
Dear Doctor
Go To
Climate Endgame: Exploring catastrophic climate change scenarios
Luke Kempa , Chi Xuc ,Joanna Depledged , Kristie L. Ebie , Goodwin Gibbinsf, Timothy A. Kohlerg,, Johan Rockstrom€ , Marten Schefferk , Hans Joachim Schellnhuberj, Will Steffenm , and Timothy M. Lentonn
PNAS 2022 Vol. 119 No. 34 e2108146119
"Prudent risk management requires consideration of badto-worst-case scenarios. Yet, for climate change, such potential futures are poorly understood. Could anthropogenic climate change result in worldwide societal collapse or even eventual human extinction? At present, this is a dangerously underexplored topic. Yet there are ample reasons to suspect that climate change could result in a global catastrophe. Analyzing the mechanisms for these extreme consequences could help galvanize action, improve resilience, and inform policy, including emergency responses. We outline current knowledge about the likelihood of extreme climate change, discuss why understanding bad-toworst cases is vital, articulate reasons for concern about catastrophic outcomes, define key terms, and put forward a research agenda. The proposed agenda covers four main questions: 1) What is the potential for climate change to drive mass extinction events? 2) What are the mechanisms that could result in human mass mortality and morbidity? 3) What are human societies' vulnerabilities to climatetriggered risk cascades, such as from conflict, political instability, and systemic financial risk? 4) How can these multiple strands of evidence—together with other global dangers— be usefully synthesized into an “integrated catastrophe assessment”? It is time for the scientific community to grapple with the challenge of better understanding catastrophic climate change.
Conclusions There is ample evidence that climate change could become catastrophic. We could enter such “endgames” at even modest levels of warming. Understanding extreme risks is important for robust decision-making, from preparation to consideration of emergency responses. This requires exploring not just higher temperature scenarios but also the potential for climate change impacts to contribute to systemic risk and other cascades. We suggest that it is time to seriously scrutinize the best way to expand our research horizons to cover this field. The proposed “Climate Endgame” research agenda provides one way to navigate this under-studied area. Facing a future of accelerating climate change while blind to worst-case scenarios is naive risk management at best and fatally foolish at worst."
4 Recommendations

All replies (13)

Yes, there is a strong consensus among scientists that an incipient global climate catastrophe has the potential to generate a global biodiversity catastrophe. The interconnectedness between climate change and biodiversity loss is well-established, and studying these two catastrophes simultaneously is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of their impacts and for developing effective strategies to mitigate their consequences.
Here are some key reasons why these catastrophes are closely related and should be studied together:
  1. Synergistic Effects: Climate change and biodiversity loss can create synergistic effects that amplify their impacts. For example, as temperatures rise due to climate change, some species may be forced to migrate to higher altitudes or latitudes to find suitable habitats. However, if habitat destruction or fragmentation due to human activities limits their movement, these species may face increased risks of extinction.
  2. Habitat Disruption: Climate change can alter ecosystems and habitats, affecting the distribution and availability of resources that species rely on for survival. This disruption can lead to shifts in species composition, decreased reproductive success, and reduced overall biodiversity.
  3. Ecosystem Services: Biodiversity provides essential ecosystem services, such as pollination, nutrient cycling, and pest control. Climate change can disrupt these services, potentially leading to cascading effects through ecosystems and impacting human food security and livelihoods.
  4. Feedback Loops: Climate change can trigger feedback loops that further threaten biodiversity. For example, as global temperatures rise, permafrost in the Arctic thaws, releasing stored carbon dioxide and methane, greenhouse gases that contribute to further warming. Such feedback loops can lead to rapid and unpredictable changes in ecosystems.
  5. Resilience and Adaptation: Biodiverse ecosystems tend to be more resilient to environmental changes. They can better adapt to shifting conditions and recover from disturbances. Climate change can undermine this resilience, making it harder for ecosystems and species to cope with the additional stressors brought on by changing climates.
  6. Conservation Strategies: Addressing both climate change and biodiversity loss requires integrated conservation strategies. For instance, protecting intact ecosystems like forests not only helps preserve biodiversity but also serves as a carbon sink, helping mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon.
  7. Policy and Mitigation Efforts: Policies and efforts aimed at mitigating climate change and preserving biodiversity can complement each other. Conservation measures can contribute to carbon sequestration, and strategies to reduce emissions can benefit ecosystems by minimizing temperature increases and extreme weather events.
Given these intricate relationships, studying climate change and biodiversity loss together is essential. A holistic approach to research, policy-making, and conservation is needed to effectively address the intertwined challenges of global climate change and biodiversity decline. Such an approach can lead to more informed decision-making, better resource allocation, and ultimately a healthier planet for both humans and the myriad species that share it.
3 Recommendations
Amanulla Khan
Anjuman Islam Janjira Degree College of Science, Murud Janjira
The relationship between climate change and biodiversity is intricate. Climate change can directly impact biodiversity through habitat loss & altered ecosystems, leading to species distribution shifts and population declines. Biodiverse n its ecosystems play a vital role in regulating climate by absorbing carbon dioxide & providing climate resilience. Both climate change & biodiversity loss have distinct drivers & impacts, but their effects can compound each other, making the situation more complex. Addressing both crises requires comprehensive global efforts and collaborative solutions to mitigate their impacts & promote a sustainable future......
2 Recommendations
Trapped heat stresses the whole planetary ecosystem (the biosphere), with a transformation from one state to another fast approaching (in this mid-century unless postponed - see ). Mass extinction will accompany this transformation. Meanwhile, human abuse of ecosystems also stresses them in the same direction. The UNSG António Guterres describes this process as a 'war on nature', to which the answer must be to restore 'peace with nature'. This requires a change of values and priorities towards living within the laws of ecological sustainability. This change is underway in many places, but needs to be accelerated and consolidated. Some implications are discussed at https://scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk/2022/11/making-peace-with-nature/.
2 Recommendations
We have known for 29 years that we need to tackle Global Warming, however only 24 countries last October are doing anything about it under the "Middle East Green Initiative" where 50 billion trees are in the process of being planted to start removing some of the CO2 out of the atmosphere.
More like ALL of the world;s military budgets need to be converted to Global Warming plantings in arid lands, like the Great Basin of the USA, Mojave desert and all of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere deserts of the world, to replant a cover on those barren heat-producing lands, with their local native plants, at the rate of 100 million hectares per year, so we can start to slow down this runaway catastrophe.
28 years of promises to lower our addiction to fossil fuels has been an illusion according to the CO2 levels which have never leveled off or dropped.
The only other rapid cooling we can do, is insulate those barren deserts with native plant cover. And at the same time, free solar panels on every rooftop, and free solar hot water hearers, both would do double duty--lower the burning of fossil fuels to generate electricity, and shade the roofs so that less energy would be needed for AC in the summer.
2 Recommendations
Sundus F Hantoosh
Forensic DNA Center for Research and Training
Dear Doctor
Go To
Climate Endgame: Exploring catastrophic climate change scenarios
Luke Kempa , Chi Xuc ,Joanna Depledged , Kristie L. Ebie , Goodwin Gibbinsf, Timothy A. Kohlerg,, Johan Rockstrom€ , Marten Schefferk , Hans Joachim Schellnhuberj, Will Steffenm , and Timothy M. Lentonn
PNAS 2022 Vol. 119 No. 34 e2108146119
"Prudent risk management requires consideration of badto-worst-case scenarios. Yet, for climate change, such potential futures are poorly understood. Could anthropogenic climate change result in worldwide societal collapse or even eventual human extinction? At present, this is a dangerously underexplored topic. Yet there are ample reasons to suspect that climate change could result in a global catastrophe. Analyzing the mechanisms for these extreme consequences could help galvanize action, improve resilience, and inform policy, including emergency responses. We outline current knowledge about the likelihood of extreme climate change, discuss why understanding bad-toworst cases is vital, articulate reasons for concern about catastrophic outcomes, define key terms, and put forward a research agenda. The proposed agenda covers four main questions: 1) What is the potential for climate change to drive mass extinction events? 2) What are the mechanisms that could result in human mass mortality and morbidity? 3) What are human societies' vulnerabilities to climatetriggered risk cascades, such as from conflict, political instability, and systemic financial risk? 4) How can these multiple strands of evidence—together with other global dangers— be usefully synthesized into an “integrated catastrophe assessment”? It is time for the scientific community to grapple with the challenge of better understanding catastrophic climate change.
Conclusions There is ample evidence that climate change could become catastrophic. We could enter such “endgames” at even modest levels of warming. Understanding extreme risks is important for robust decision-making, from preparation to consideration of emergency responses. This requires exploring not just higher temperature scenarios but also the potential for climate change impacts to contribute to systemic risk and other cascades. We suggest that it is time to seriously scrutinize the best way to expand our research horizons to cover this field. The proposed “Climate Endgame” research agenda provides one way to navigate this under-studied area. Facing a future of accelerating climate change while blind to worst-case scenarios is naive risk management at best and fatally foolish at worst."
4 Recommendations
Dariusz Prokopowicz
Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw 🏛️
I, too, believe that the effects of the ongoing process of global warming are increasingly generating an accelerating loss of biodiversity of the planet's natural ecosystems.
And what is your opinion on this topic?
Please answer,
I invite everyone to join the discussion,
Best wishes,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
4 Recommendations
Suraj Kapoor
Armed Forces Medical College
yes , We witnessed a great loss of biodiversity during rainy season in State of Himachal Pradesh in India . It created loss of not only human life but also flora and fauna , affected tourism and trade and ecosystem to a large extent
1 Recommendation
Jamel Chahed
University of Tunis El Manar
The notion of water security in an arid country takes on another dimension when the comprehensive water balance concept is applied to water used by rain-fed agriculture and to the water equivalent of international food exchanges. In the case of Tunisia, this concept expands the prospects for improvements in national food security by optimizing the food balance and the corresponding virtual water flux. It also prompts reconsideration of criteria and indicators classically used to characterize water stress situations. The current situation shows that about 30% of the water used in Tunisia is imported as food (virtual water); that number is likely to reach 40–50% in 2025 due to climate change, diet change, demographic growth, and improved water management. Asia and North Africa will most likely not be self-sufficient in terms of food production and will need to import food from other continents (e.g., South America). Africa, however, could be self-sufficient if its existing water resources are developed. Bioenergy production is likely to be limited to a small fraction of the global energy needs. Major food shortages in cases of severe global droughts (e.g., during very strong El Niño events) may occur, however, with severe consequences in terms of food availability.
Excerpt from: Besbes, M., Chahed, J., Hamdane, A., & De Marsily, G. (2010). Changing water resources and food supply in arid zones: Tunisia. Water and Sustainability in Arid Regions: Bridging the Gap Between Physical and Social Sciences, 103-121. Available on:
3 Recommendations
Jamel Chahed
University of Tunis El Manar
"Changes in stratospheric ozone and climate over the past 40-plus years have altered the solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation conditions at the Earth's surface. Ozone depletion has also contributed to climate change across the Southern Hemisphere. These changes are interacting in complex ways to affect human health, food and water security, and ecosystem services. Many adverse effects of high UV exposure have been avoided thanks to the Montreal Protocol with its Amendments and Adjustments, which have effectively controlled the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. This international treaty has also played an important role in mitigating climate change. Climate change is modifying UV exposure and affecting how people and ecosystems respond to UV; these effects will become more pronounced in the future. The interactions between stratospheric ozone, climate and UV radiation will therefore shift over time; however, the Montreal Protocol will continue to have far-reaching benefits for human well-being and environmental sustainability". Abstract of the well-cited paoer:
Barnes, P. W., Williamson, C. E., Lucas, R. M., Robinson, S. A., Madronich, S., Paul, N. D., ... & Zepp, R. G. (2019). Ozone depletion, ultraviolet radiation, climate change and prospects for a sustainable future. Nature Sustainability, 2(7), 569-579.
Available on
Jamel Chahed
University of Tunis El Manar
The arid zone is a geographical and climatic reality and our ancestors naturally adapted to it. This figure shows a shot of the olive groves of Chaal in Sfax (Tunisia): Olive trees as far as the eye can see, cultivated without the slightest drop of irrigation water, produce Olive-Oil of exceptional quality under rainfall of less than 250 mm per year. The same goes for Pistachio trees in Iran, Fig trees, and Almond trees... around the Mediterranean, all cultivated under rainfed conditions.
Figure source: A Conceptual Model for National Water Security in Water-Scarce Countries, By Jamel Chahed International Workshop on Water Security and Technology Innovation in Hydro-Environmental Engineering July 13, 2023. Available on:
See Also
"National water security– Case study of an arid country, Tunisia (Authors: Besbes, Chahed Hamdane), Springer (2019) 4:11". The Previous French version of the book is available in chapters on:
1 Recommendation
For the sake of future generations, global warming, climate change and the carbon footprint need to be worked on as a matter of urgency.
2 Recommendations
Jamel Chahed
University of Tunis El Manar
The paper by Taylor, R., Scanlon, B., Döll, P. et al., 2013 (Around 2k Citations) "Groundwater and climate change. Nature Clim Change 3, 322–329 (2013)" reviews "recent research assessing the impacts of climate on groundwater through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between groundwater and climate"
See Also:
Besbes, M., & Chahed, J. (2023). Predictability of water resources with global climate models. Case of Northern Tunisia. Comptes Rendus. Géoscience, 355(S1), 1-22. Available on:
1 Recommendation
Jamel Chahed
University of Tunis El Manar
On Earth Energy Budget. The energy transfers within the earth interfaces, analyzed by Woodcock, indicate that the associated budget of CO2 or Vapor in the atmosphere if increased vis-à-vis a reference state, should be accompanied by a relative cooling effect. IMHO, these results are incomplete, not because they are discordant with what is admitted as "consensus", but because these come under the "two-by-two separate parameters analysis" fundamentally unsuitable to tackle all nonlinear interactions involved in Climate determinants.
However and quite surprisingly, Woodcock's results, compared with the data, succeeded in explaining the temperature anomalies observed in different regions of the planet, not only by reference to fracking but also by other considerations; among them the various elements of the natural and anthropic carbon cycle
[1] Woodcock, L. V. (2022). Global Warming by Geothermal Heat from Fracking: Energy Industry’s Enthalpy Footprints. Entropy, 24(9), 1316.
Available on:
1 Recommendation

Similar questions and discussions

Are so-called carbon credits an effective instrument for real reduction of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere?
Discussion
5 replies
  • Dariusz ProkopowiczDariusz Prokopowicz
In your opinion, are so-called "carbon credits" consisting of some corporation taking a specific patch of natural forest cover, including, for example, a patch of natural Amazon Rainforest, for an additional ton of CO2 emissions, an effective instrument for real reduction of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere?
To consider the question of the role of so-called "carbon credits" in the context of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, one would have to assume that such a system actually reliably works. However, from what is reported by independent journalists, environmentalists, people who care about protecting the climate, biosphere and biodiversity of the planet's natural ecosystems, including the forests of the Amazon, even those declared patches of natural Amazon Rainforest taken for protection under the so-called carbon credits are nevertheless often cut down.
Perhaps something will finally begin to change, to improve, in terms of protecting the climate, biosphere and biodiversity of the natural ecosystems of the Amazon Rainforest in connection with the first Amazon Forest Conservation Summit in 14 years, currently being held in Belém, Brazil. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon fell by 60 percent in July compared to the same month last year. The announcement of the positive trend coincides with the start of a summit in Belém of the 8 countries whose territories include the Amazon forest. This summit is attended by representatives of the governments of the 8 countries whose territory includes the natural Amazon Forest. Perhaps plans and commitments will be made to realistically protect this largest terrestrial reservoir of natural biodiversity and natural forests characterized by a particularly high contribution to absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere and producing oxygen. It may also be that the processes of increasing the scale of protection of these forests and reducing their still large-scale logging will be accelerated so that by 2030 at the latest, the deforestation of these forests will be completely ended. This is a particularly important issue because more than 20 percent of the Amazon rainforest has already disappeared due to human activity.
In view of the above, I address the following question to the esteemed community of scientists and researchers:
In your opinion, are the so-called carbon credits, which consist in the fact that some corporation, for an additional ton of CO2 emissions, will take under protection a certain patch of natural forest cover, including, for example, a patch of natural Amazon Rainforest, an effective instrument for real reduction of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere?
Are so-called carbon credits an effective instrument to realistically reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere?
What do you think about this topic?
What is your opinion on this issue?
Please answer,
I invite everyone to join the discussion,
Thank you very much,
Best regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
Counting on your opinions, on getting to know your personal opinion, on a fair approach to the discussion of scientific issues, I deliberately used the phrase "in your opinion" in the question.
The above text is entirely my own work written by me on the basis of my research.
In writing this text I did not use other sources or automatic text generation systems.
Copyright by Dariusz Prokopowicz
With new technologies, will it be possible to restore the biodiversity of natural ecosystems previously destroyed by humans?
Discussion
12 replies
  • Dariusz ProkopowiczDariusz Prokopowicz
With the smooth green transformation of the economy, building a green, sustainable, zero-carbon closed-loop economy, and with the large-scale implementation of new green technologies and zero-carbon energy eco-innovations, etc., will it be possible in the future to restore the biodiversity of natural ecosystems previously destroyed by man, made by the development of civilization the loss of biodiversity of natural ecosystems?
In recent years, large-scale green investment projects have been launched in some countries, which are being carried out as part of the green transformation of the economy to build a sustainable, green, zero-carbon zero-growth and closed-loop economy. The essence of the ongoing large-scale implementation of the aforementioned processes in some regions of the world is to carry out a pro-environmental and pro-climate transformation of the classic growth, brown, linear economy of excess into a sustainable, green, zero-carbon zero-growth and closed-loop economy. One of the economic regions of the world where these issues have been prioritized, ambitious plans have been set out to smoothly carry out the green transformation of the economy is the European Union. One of the many components of the green transformation of the economy is the large-scale creation and implementation of new green technologies and eco-innovations. Well, in recent years, many new green technologies and eco-innovations are being created in the framework of clean emission-free energy, biodegradable materials, electromobility, cleaning up the polluted environment, increasing the scale of recycling, economical use of natural resources, conservation of clean water resources, restoration of green areas in cities, reforestation of wasteland and civilization-degraded areas, and so on. If such processes of efficiently carried out green transformation of the economy are carried out on a large scale in all countries of the world, there is still a chance to significantly slow down the progressive process of global warming and save the net from the projected global climate catastrophe. Therefore, the chance to save at least in part the remaining biosphere of the planet, to save the biodiversity of the natural ecosystems of the planet, i.e. the greatest value of the planet Earth that has been created by the many millions of years of evolution of life on the planet, increases. The issue of conservation, protecting the planet's biosphere and saving the remaining biodiversity and its restoration through the use of new green technologies and eco-innovations man can at least partially repair what he destroyed in the past. Man should protect the biosphere and climate, should restore the biodiversity of natural ecosystems with a view to the future of future generations of people, the future of the planet, the achievements of the evolution of life on planet Earth, and so on. If man in his nature is friendly towards the biosphere and not selfish towards the planet, the only planet he has, then he probably wants to save the climate, biosphere and biodiversity from total degradation. Accordingly, in recent years there has been a growing demand for the creation and implementation of new green technologies and eco-innovations. New research and implementation centers and new research projects are being established to develop new technological solutions so that the process of green transformation can be carried out more efficiently and quickly. And time is of the essence, as the process of global warming continues to accelerate and there is little time left to reach a critically high state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Besides, thanks to the developing cooperation between scientists and researchers studying this issue, working in different parts of the world, the chances of realizing the plan to save the climate, biosphere and biodiversity from total degradation are becoming greater.
In view of the above, I address the following question to the esteemed community of scientists and researchers:
With the smooth green transformation of the economy, building a green, sustainable, zero-carbon closed-loop economy, and with the large-scale implementation of new green technologies and eco-innovations of zero-carbon energy, etc., will it be possible in the future to restore the biodiversity of natural ecosystems previously destroyed by man, the loss of biodiversity of natural ecosystems made by the development of civilization?
Will it be possible to restore the biodiversity of natural ecosystems previously destroyed by man, made by the development of civilization loss of biodiversity of natural ecosystems, thanks to new technologies?
And what is your opinion on this topic?
What is your opinion on this issue?
Please answer,
I invite everyone to join the discussion,
Thank you very much,
Warm regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
The above text is entirely my own work written by me based on my research.
Copyright by Dariusz Prokopowicz
How can environmental protection and biodiversity be improved by using current ecological technologies?
Discussion
1993 replies
  • Dariusz ProkopowiczDariusz Prokopowicz
Due to the current civilization progress in recent decades, acceleration of the development of industry, automotive, urban agglomerations, intensification of agricultural production, etc. and related greenhouse gas emissions, global warming, ozone layer depletion in the atecologicalecologicalmosphere, increase of environmental pollution, growing problem of smog in urban agglomerations, the increase in pollution of the seas and oceans to which unsorted waste is thrown away is cut out as part of the predatory economy of tropical forests in the Amazon and other largest natural forest ecosystems.
In addition, the secondary effect of global warming of the Earth's climate is the increasing, more frequent weather anomalies, including drought, leading to steppe and desertification of areas that were previously natural forest ecosystems or areas exploited by agriculture.
As a result of the above-mentioned processes, every year many species of flora and fauna disappear forever.
As a result, natural biodiversity diminishes, which for millions of years evolved evolutionally on Earth.
In this way the natural resources of the planet Earth are irretrievably in decline.
In view of the above, the issue of environmental protection and biodiversity is one of the most important challenges of humanity in the 21st century.
Classical economics must change towards a green economy based on the strategy of sustainable pro-ecological development.
Therefore, I am asking you for the following query:
How can environmental protection and biodiversity be improved by using current ecological technologies?
Please, answer, comments.
I invite you to the discussion.
I pointed out the high level of relevance of the issue taken up in the above question in the article:
Please respond with what do you think about the issues described in this article?
Best wishes
Dariusz Prokopowicz

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