Question
Asked 19th Jun, 2021

Why butyl acrylate adhesive dos not form a uniform film on pre-treated propylene?

I have synthesized a pressure-sensitive adhesive containing 37 % butyl acrylate and 3% acrylic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate as surfactants in nitrogen atmosfer. After synthesizing, I noticed that the adhesive forms an island shape on the surface of the pre-treated propylene film, and the adhesive film is not uniform.

Popular answers (1)

21st Aug, 2021
Abdelkader BOUAZIZ
SOUGUEUR Division - Chemistry (POLYMERS), Université Ibn Khaldoun Tiaret
Dear all, in addition to the valuable answer of Prof. Frank T. Edelmann, I think it is difficult to screen the reasons regarding the multiple variables involved, but I strongly suspect the uneven surface modified polypropylene. This means a surface characterization should be done first. My Regards
11 Recommendations

All Answers (2)

3rd Aug, 2021
Frank T. Edelmann
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg
Dear Ruhollah, sorry to see that your interesting technical question has not yet received an expert answer. We work in synthetic inorganic chemistry, so that I would not call myself a proven expert in polymer chemistry. I assume that by "pre-treated propylene film" you mean polypropylene, right? My guess is that the sodium lauryl sulfate surfactant could play a key role in the unexpected performance of your pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA). Perhaps the sodium lauryl sulfate is not compatible with the non-polar surface of polypropylene. In this context please have a look at the following potentially useful article entitled:
Screening Experiments for Butyl Acrylate/Vinyl Acetate Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives
Unfortunatey this paper has not been posted as public full text on RG. However, the corresponding author has an RG profile (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marc-Dube-2). Thus there is a good chance that you can request the full text directly from this author via RG.
In this study the authors used either sodium dodecyl sulfate or partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (= PVOH with a molecular weight of 22,000 and a degree of hydrolysis of 80%, commercially available from Cevol) as surfactant components. Apparently the partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) gave significantly better results on PET surfaces. Thus it might be worth a try using this PVOH in your experiments too.
Good luck with your research and best wishes, Frank Edelmann
2 Recommendations
21st Aug, 2021
Abdelkader BOUAZIZ
SOUGUEUR Division - Chemistry (POLYMERS), Université Ibn Khaldoun Tiaret
Dear all, in addition to the valuable answer of Prof. Frank T. Edelmann, I think it is difficult to screen the reasons regarding the multiple variables involved, but I strongly suspect the uneven surface modified polypropylene. This means a surface characterization should be done first. My Regards
11 Recommendations

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