Question
Asked 19th Apr, 2016

Which is the best software for 3D reconstruction from CT /CBCT images ?

Which is the best software for 3D reconstruction from CT /CBCT images ?like Reconstruction ToolKit

Most recent answer

15th Jun, 2022
Nicola Caporaso
Campden BRI
I have recently found a software called "RadiAnt DICOM Viewer": it is simply amazing, really easy to use and does great 3D reconstructions. It's not free but there is a trial period.

Popular Answers (1)

20th Apr, 2016
Dzemal Gazibegovic
Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Hi,
I'm working with Slicer 3D https://www.slicer.org/ which is an open source project. It's powerful and has a lots of dedicated modules to chose. However, it is not intuitive and as any open source software there is no structured documentation and you have to find your way through the concept and navigation. It's available for Mac and Win.
I'm using it efficiently for cutting volumes, scaling intensity range, resampling, manually as well as automatically co-registering MRI/CBCT or CT/CBCT. Creating labels and masks. Volumetric 3D rendering, reconstructing implants, filtering......
Another user friendlier alternative would be Osirix, although commercial there is a freeware version which you may download after registering. http://www.osirix-viewer.com/
And it's only available for Mac.
Another open source alternative is MITK workbench: http://mitk.org/wiki/Downloads
Lot's of common features with Slicer and Osirix, friendlier than Slicer and has stronger 3D rendering engine but is far more restricted.
If you like operating with nodes VoreenVE might be interesting as well.
There are few other solutions or alternatives but the listed ones and in particular Slicer are my personal favorites.
12 Recommendations

All Answers (32)

20th Apr, 2016
Dzemal Gazibegovic
Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Hi,
I'm working with Slicer 3D https://www.slicer.org/ which is an open source project. It's powerful and has a lots of dedicated modules to chose. However, it is not intuitive and as any open source software there is no structured documentation and you have to find your way through the concept and navigation. It's available for Mac and Win.
I'm using it efficiently for cutting volumes, scaling intensity range, resampling, manually as well as automatically co-registering MRI/CBCT or CT/CBCT. Creating labels and masks. Volumetric 3D rendering, reconstructing implants, filtering......
Another user friendlier alternative would be Osirix, although commercial there is a freeware version which you may download after registering. http://www.osirix-viewer.com/
And it's only available for Mac.
Another open source alternative is MITK workbench: http://mitk.org/wiki/Downloads
Lot's of common features with Slicer and Osirix, friendlier than Slicer and has stronger 3D rendering engine but is far more restricted.
If you like operating with nodes VoreenVE might be interesting as well.
There are few other solutions or alternatives but the listed ones and in particular Slicer are my personal favorites.
12 Recommendations
20th Apr, 2016
Rhys M Goodhead
University of Exeter
For a fairly easy early reconstruction of your data you could use ImageJ or FIJI (essentially the same thing). There is a reasonable amount of support online and it's free to download.
20th Apr, 2016
Sonia V Guevara Perez
National University of Colombia
You have many options: You can use Mimics (materialise) or AMIRA-AVIZO that are licensed software.  And you have free software like 3D slicer or Image J , and you can do the almost same functions with a little more training.
Deleted profile
Hi,
I second Slicer and also MITK, but additionally recommend DeVIDE. DeVIDE is open-source visual programming software for rapidly prototyping complex 3D visualisation and image processing solutions by graphically connecting up colourful boxes and writing small Python scripts. Devide includes Python, VTK, ITK, numpy, matplotlib, wxpython and more.
You can see how easy it is to do CT surface reconstruction with it in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PtTpRz3aU8
20th Apr, 2016
Paulo Henrique Junqueira Amorim
Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer
Open source and cross-platform? InVesalius! 
1 Recommendation
21st Apr, 2016
Anindya Sen
Heritage Institute of Technology
As DICOM images will be involved so I recommend a DICOM viewer called  RadiAnt DICOM Viewer 3.0.2.12209. A free evaluation version is available at  http://www.radiantviewer.com/download.php
16th Sep, 2016
P.G. Makhija
GCS Medical College Hospital and Research Centre
I will definitely go for user friendly Invesalius after having tried many open source software. Slicer 3D and other software are also quite useful. To start with better go with Invesalius 3 available at http://www.cti.gov.br/invesalius/ 
2 Recommendations
28th May, 2017
David Wiley
Stratovan Corporation
You can also try our software below which can load DICOM scans, perform 3D visualization, extract surfaces, and export them.
30th Oct, 2017
Danila Kozhevnikov
Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
All the answers above are good, but they are devoted to visualization programs, not reconstruction.
An alternative to the RTK is the ASTRA toolbox: http://www.astra-toolbox.com/
9 Recommendations
4th Jun, 2018
Tao Xu
Second Military Medical University, Shanghai
I use Horos, which is anther open source software, very friendly and powerful.
4th Jun, 2018
Hasan Anıl Atalay
Beylikdüzü Goverment Hospital
dornheim segmenter, easy to learn
1st Aug, 2018
Osama Rahil Shaltami
University of Benghazi
I recommend David's answer
Best Regards
1 Recommendation
14th Aug, 2018
Philippe Young
University of Exeter
Hi Zhicheng, please feel free to look at my company's software Simpleware - https://www.synopsys.com/simpleware.html. Best, Philippe
13th Sep, 2018
Furqan Ullah
University of California, Berkeley
I would recommend you Real3d VolViCon (http://real3d.pk/volvicon/) which is very simple to use and reconstructs 3D mesh model with just 3 clicks.
VolViCon is an advanced application for reconstruction of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), ultrasound, and x-rays images. It gives features for exporting 3D surfaces or volume as triangular mesh files for creating physical models using 3D printing technologies. It also provides high-quality visualization, linear and angular measurement tools, and various type of markups. It takes a single raw volume file or a sequence of 2D (i.e., DICOM) files and reconstructs 3D volume (voxels) and mesh (surfaces) models.
1 Recommendation
23rd Oct, 2018
Ankit Nayak
Banasthali University
I have used much software for 3D reconstruction and I have found that MAGICS is the best tool for this work.
Because it has simple GUI, less computing time, good reconstruction algorithm moreover it is very simple to navigate for the new user because it has very rich help documents.
18th Jan, 2020
Omid Ghozatlou
Polytechnic University of Bucharest
I think Itk-SNAP is good software for 3c reconstruction
1 Recommendation
14th Mar, 2020
Nguyen Tuan
Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology (HCMUT)
I intend to reconstruct 3D images based on Meshlab. but currently I am not able to open Meshlab on my PC. Just 2 images appearing quickly then disappearing
18th Jun, 2020
Evgeni Terentiev
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Dear Dr Zhicheng Zhang, the best mat software is that which allows you to plan and achieve the maximum estimated (by value SR) super-resolution on 1D-3D data from measuring devices. To do this, we are implementing new mathematics, look at the latest draft articles in Russian. I currently do not have data from CT/microtomographs and radars, etc.
Yours
Evgeni Terentiev
17th Sep, 2020
Abdelghani Rouini
Ziane Achour University of Djelfa
3 Recommendations
17th Sep, 2020
Abdelghani Rouini
Ziane Achour University of Djelfa
3 Recommendations
4th Feb, 2021
Nivana Mohan
University of KwaZulu-Natal
RadiAnt
1 Recommendation
3rd Sep, 2021
Jiayu Hu
University of Birmingham
Mimics and Geomagic
2 Recommendations
22nd Sep, 2021
Andrew Bickerdike
University of Exeter
Mimics (medical/research) seems to be the most robust and "clean" software you can you. However, it is not free.
3D slicer is a great piece of free open-source software. But as mentioned earlier in the thread it has not got much in the way of guidance on how to use it.
1 Recommendation
30th Sep, 2021
Saidul Islam
University of Technology Sydney
Mimics and Geomagic
1 Recommendation
1st Oct, 2021
Hamed Keramati
King's College London
If you have a budget to purchase, go for Mimics; if you prefer a free alternative, I recommend 3D slicer.
1 Recommendation
3rd Oct, 2021
Md Mizanur Rahman
Western Sydney University
OsiriX and Mimics
1 Recommendation
9th Nov, 2021
John Corda
Manipal Academy of Higher Education
3D Slicer
1 Recommendation
25th Nov, 2021
Cheng Wei
University of Dundee
I use both Mimics and Simpleware, which are not free. Invesalius seems to be a simplified Mimics and has limited functions but it is free. I use OsiriX but as people mentioned here, it is a visualisation software rather than a reconstruction software.

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