Question
Asked 21st Apr, 2014

Which plants and trees consume the maximum amount of polluted gases in the atmosphere?

Nowadays, fossil fuel usage, number of vehicles usage, number of industries and the people requirements are also increasing. These are guiding to increase the pollution rate to our atmosphere. I need some details about what kind of plants and trees are consuming maximum amount of polluted gas. If we cultivate these kind of plants in our globe, which can help to reduce the pollution level. So please give me some ideas and list out the plants and trees of their absorb level or ratio.

Most recent answer

17th Apr, 2021
Sailesh Ranjitkar
N.Gene Solution of Natural Innovation
Cotoneaster sp. - researcher from Royal Horticultural Society found that Cotoneaster sp. can absorb pollutants around busy streets and it is 20% more effective at cleaning the air of pollutants. see https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3298/7/10/81
1 Recommendation

Popular Answers (1)

22nd Apr, 2014
Noa Lincoln
Univeristy of Hawaii at Manoa
Interesting questions. I agree with Yogesh that many species have been studied to look at CO2 absorption rates, which is essentialyl ultimately going to be more or less equivalent to their growth rate. Especially plantations species have been very well documented in this area.
But I understand your question to go beyond CO2 and question what plants absorb other chemical compounds as well, NOx, SOx, maybe heavy metal compounds, etc. I donʻt know of any good literature in this area, but it might be a good idea to look at plants that have evolved in similar conditions. Areas with constant volcanic activity produce many of the same air pollution constituents that we are producing today, and some plants seem much better able to cope with high levels of these gasses than others. I donʻt know if that translates to the plants actually absorbing and storing the pollutants. One tree in Hawaii, where we have had more or less continuous volcanic activity over the 70 million year history of the islands, Meterosideros polymorpha, seems especially well adapted to survive the high NOx and SOx that accompanies volcanic emissions. It might be worth it to look if there is literature on its absorption of the pollutants.
13 Recommendations

All Answers (123)

21st Apr, 2014
Kunal .
SGT University
The two that immediate comes in my mind are Ficus religiosa (Peepal Tree) and Azadirachta indica (Neem Tree). Both are well cited for purification of polluted air.
2 Recommendations
21st Apr, 2014
Baskar Thangaraj
Khalifa University
Dear Kunal
Yes, Azadirachta indica is a more valuable plant. But we are living in the world. All the places are polluting more.. But we cannot plantation that kind trees in our earth due to copy right. Copy right thing is another problem for cultivation of these kind plantation on the earth.
21st Apr, 2014
Kunal .
SGT University
copy right?.... I don't think that natural plants need copy right... may be the Azadirachta is the native plant of any country in the world but the use of plant cannot be copy righted. we can plant any plant any where. If the copy right problem still occurs... do not change the original name of the plant and use it.
1 Recommendation
21st Apr, 2014
Baskar Thangaraj
Khalifa University
Dear Kunal.
I do not know clearly about copy right things. But why do not we implement that kind of plants in all over the world for saving our earth and making good environment to our future generation.
1 Recommendation
22nd Apr, 2014
Saif Uddin
Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research
Preferential uptake of toxic gasses is not known for any specific species. Certainly Pepal and Neem are excellent trees that can grow well in even extremes climate and can be very instrumental in cleaning air.
1 Recommendation
22nd Apr, 2014
YOGESH CHANDRA TRIPATHI
Forest Research Institute Dehradun
Trees of any shape, size or genetic origin help absorb CO2. Scientifically, it is universally agreed that the least expensive and perhaps easiest way to help offset the CO2 is to plant a tree appropriate for the given region and climate. Trees namely Common Horse-chestnut, Black Walnut, American Sweetgum, Ponderosa Pine, Red Pine, White Pine, London Plane, Hispaniolan Pine, Douglas Fir, Scarlet Oak, Red Oak, Virginia Live Oak and Bald Cypress are found to be good at absorbing and storing CO2. In Indian context, Neem, Ficus, Oake Walnut, Mahogany, Cassia; herbs like Tulsi and the woody grass Bamboos are well known CO2 sequesters and air purifiers.
12 Recommendations
22nd Apr, 2014
Noa Lincoln
Univeristy of Hawaii at Manoa
Interesting questions. I agree with Yogesh that many species have been studied to look at CO2 absorption rates, which is essentialyl ultimately going to be more or less equivalent to their growth rate. Especially plantations species have been very well documented in this area.
But I understand your question to go beyond CO2 and question what plants absorb other chemical compounds as well, NOx, SOx, maybe heavy metal compounds, etc. I donʻt know of any good literature in this area, but it might be a good idea to look at plants that have evolved in similar conditions. Areas with constant volcanic activity produce many of the same air pollution constituents that we are producing today, and some plants seem much better able to cope with high levels of these gasses than others. I donʻt know if that translates to the plants actually absorbing and storing the pollutants. One tree in Hawaii, where we have had more or less continuous volcanic activity over the 70 million year history of the islands, Meterosideros polymorpha, seems especially well adapted to survive the high NOx and SOx that accompanies volcanic emissions. It might be worth it to look if there is literature on its absorption of the pollutants.
13 Recommendations
14th Oct, 2017
S N Mishra
Maharshi Dayanand University
This is true that we are still lacking a very precise & concise study on specific plant with specific pollutant absorbing potential.Indeed , all plants have potential to abate the pollution.But, still tree with vast canopy size will be more fast cleanser of pollutants. Otherwise, grass land & ocean are biger sink of carbon. Since, human population at danger in present time, hence, we need to know specific plants depending for pollution abatement on particular agro climatic zone. Like Sanghi or Delhi & neary zones.
1 Recommendation
7th Dec, 2017
Angel Arcos-Vargas
Universidad de Sevilla
Someone has information about forests capture CO2 depending on age, kind of tree and attitude?
4th Jun, 2018
Manoj K. Sharma
National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources
There are several plants that accumulate pollutant such as harmful gases from air. These includes: Neem, Ficus revoluta, Chlorophytum, Pines (Ponderosa, red, white and Hispaniolan pines), Oake (Scarlet, Red and Virginia Live Oak), Douglas fir, Bald Cypress, Common Horse-chestnut, Black Walnut, London Plane, American Sweetgum, Trembesi rain tree (Samanea saman), Bamboo, Cassia (Cassia sp), Cananga/Kenanga (Canangium odoratum), Pingku (Dysoxylum excelsum), Banyan (Ficus benyamina), Krey Payung (Fellicium decipiens), Matoa (Pometia pinnata), Mahogany (Swettiana mahagoni), Saga (Adenanthera pavonina), Areca Palm (Chrysalidocarpus lutescens), Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa), Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii), Rubber Plant (Ficus robusta), Dracaena “Janet Craig” (Dracaena deremensis), Dwarf Date Palm (Phoenix roebelenii), Ficus Alii (Ficus macleilandii “Alii”), Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata “Bostoniensis”), Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum "Mauna Loa"), Red Emerald (Philodendron erubescens), the Lacy Tree (Philodendron selloum), the Heart-Leaf (Philodendron oxycardium), and the Elephant Ear (Philodendron domesticum or tuxla) etc.
1 Recommendation
23rd Jul, 2018
Marcus Victor Almeida Campos
Universidade do Estado do Pará
The link below is a survey on the selection of species for pollutant sequestration. In addition to the selection of species, it is important to study the management in the initial phase of these species, when we generate quality seedlings (greater biomass, root and proportional shoot), the better the performance of the trees in the field.
2 Recommendations
24th Jul, 2018
Moussa Soulé
Northern Arizona University
There are many,but I can suggest to you these species : Azadirachta indica ,Ficus religiosa ( )
30th Sep, 2018
Mahesh Kumar
Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology
1 Recommendation
30th Sep, 2018
Mahesh Kumar
Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology
2 Recommendations
1st Oct, 2018
Dewanand Makhan
Naturalis Biodiversity Center
The Pinus species.
1 Recommendation
1st Oct, 2018
YOGESH CHANDRA TRIPATHI
Forest Research Institute Dehradun
Plants absorb carbon dioxide to grow and build biomass. Fastest growing plants and high biomass producing plant can absorb much CO2. In this regard Bamboos, claiming to produce highest biomass per unit area and time and being able to grow in diverse agroclimatic conditions, can be an appropriate candidate to mitigate CO2 and polluting gases from the atmosphere.
1 Recommendation
1st Oct, 2018
Dewanand Makhan
Naturalis Biodiversity Center
Pinus species are evergreen plants that has leaves throughout the year, always green.
1 Recommendation
8th Oct, 2018
Dr Justin R Nayagam
Union Christian College, India
Bamboos and the grasses can be of good choice
2 Recommendations
9th Oct, 2018
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Any trees are good, and inparticular Neem tree may be good choice.
2 Recommendations
11th Oct, 2018
Ajit Seshadri
Vels University
Dear Researchers.
Its great to note the subject of CO2 fixing, etc..
It is very much required for Highways and other regions for apt remedials.
The urgent need is for remedying municipal waste-water remaining in flowing streams- Nallahs as their called in India, and stagnant- cesspools.
We have tried having Elephant grass grown in 2m by 2m floats- say in around 24 of them..In order to provide remediation and also evolve bio-mass to be used for community benefits,
The bio-mass is harvested for commercial benefits for breeding pigs, ducks, goats etc.. Duly the effluent water and the bio-produces are tested and found to be good.
There is a lot of scope of phyto-remediation using these methods.
At the influent side, to cesspool, we are assessing in having aromatic flowering plants to offset the odour from the waste- water etc.. Anyone having any experience on good aromatic flowering- plants pl do suggest.
well wishes.
1 Recommendation
11th Jun, 2019
Satvant kaur Saini
IORA ECOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS, NEW DELHI
Good to get information on carbon sequestration rate of various tree species. Though, Neem is a good species fast growing and host of several other species of birds and insects, but Ficus religiosa/ Pipal is reported as the best suitable species for remediation of pollution. Ficus religiosa has the capacity of releasing an organic content Isoprene in large quantity which help to prevent depletion of ozone layer, size of leaves are also comparatively big which absorbs more dust particles on it. In the state of Telangana Ficus spp have been used for road side plantations.
However, on road side plantation we have to promote three layers i.e. herbs/grasses, shrubs and trees. Shrubs cover the open bole of trees up to 3-4 m from the ground and small herbs/ grasses also bind the soil particles. Marigold (Tagettus spp) is a good species of ornamental flower and grows in rainy and winter season, other suggested species are: Ixora bracteata, Nyctanthes arbor tris-tis, Nerium spp, Gardenia spp etc.
4 Recommendations
11th Jun, 2019
Dewanand Makhan
Naturalis Biodiversity Center
You are right Satvant kaur Saini
25th Jun, 2019
Zakiuddin Ahmed
Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
Your answer is good to solve the pollution problem in cities with bulk population for their environment and ecosystem.
1 Recommendation
25th Jun, 2019
Ajit Seshadri
Vels University
@Satvant Kaur Saini has given the clear design to have 3 cordon green-scaping ie.
Herb and grasses then shrubs and then peripheral trees. One can add IAQ improver plants for inner areas. Open terraces and balconies and others to have large potted plants.
The purpose of plant sp. too has been given.
Therefore one can design, plan and implemnt greens at a specific site for intended benefits.
Well wishes .
1 Recommendation
3rd Jul, 2019
Jinda Jan-orn
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Plants (neem and cassia) with high photosynthesis should consume more carbon dioxide. (other gas?) However, other nutrients should be needed. Urea should be more useful than nitrate for foliar or leaf (via stomata) fertilizer application.
2 Recommendations
3rd Jul, 2019
Ajit Seshadri
Vels University
Adding further to notings by @ Jinda Jan-orn , Ideal and well adapted Landscaping principles and practices could be evolved clubbing the benefits and merits derived on natural greening to happen naturally, for aiding the communities.
Well wishes.
1 Recommendation
4th Jul, 2019
Vishal Rasal
wildlife conservation society india
Hardwood species are better in carbon sequestration. Sometime scientifically managed grassland will outperform the forest.
1 Recommendation
4th Jul, 2019
Dewanand Makhan
Naturalis Biodiversity Center
I agree with Ajit Seshadri and Vishal Rasal
8th Jul, 2019
Jinda Jan-orn
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
I agree, in pineapple plantation such as in Hawaii, it look nice compared to sugarcane; I think pineapple also releases oxygen at nice by CAM photosynthesis.
1 Recommendation
13th Jul, 2019
Firas Ahmed
University of Baghdad
Dave Nowak, a researcher at the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Research Station in Syracuse, New York, has studied the use of trees for carbon sequestration in urban settings across the United States. A 2002 study he co-authored lists the common horse-chestnut, black walnut, American sweetgum, ponderosa pine, red pine, white pine, London plane, Hispaniolan pine, Douglas fir, scarlet oak, red oak, Virginia live oak, and bald cypress as examples of trees especially good at absorbing and storing CO2. Nowak advises urban land managers to avoid trees that require a lot of maintenance, as the burning of fossil fuels to power equipment like trucks and chainsaws will only erase the carbon absorption gains otherwise made.
4 Recommendations
15th Jul, 2019
Peter Baker
Climate Edge Ltd
If you want to establish trees for the long term, it's actually quite complex.
Most important thing is to select species that are most compatible to the local environment - temperature and rainfall especially. Another important characteristic is hardiness and ease to maintain, a lot of young trees die because of neglect.
And you want to plant trees that would be valued by the local community - e.g. fruit trees, so that they stand a better chance of not being cut down.
So I would suggest that CO2 absorbing capacity is rather low on the list of things to be concerned about.
Personally, if I were embarking on this in your area (Madurai?) I'd plant some quick growing leguminous species to establish ground cover (e.g. Leucaena), then plant saplings of your preferred trees under their shade.
2 Recommendations
15th Jul, 2019
Md Moniruzzaman
Bangladesh Council of Scientific & Industrial Research Rajshahi Bangladesh
Eichhornia spp are best for this purpose.
1 Recommendation
17th Jul, 2019
David Dawson
Some of the discussion introduces ideas that are not really relevant. Yes, trees do convert CO2 into O2 when they photosynthesise, but they have a net production of CO2 through respiration when they are not photosynthesising. Leaves and other bits of the tree fall and decay, also releasing CO2. Growth of the tree sequesters carbon, but at a very slow rate. So, a growing tree is helpful but, after time trees die and release CO2. There's so much O2 in the atmosphere that the converse story about this gas is immaterial - the very small changes are dwarfed by the amount there already. A useful review of the effects of trees on CO2 is Dennis Baldocchi "The physics and ecology of mining carbon dioxide from the
atmosphere by ecosystems" Global Change Biology. 2019. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14559 There are plenty of good reasons for planting trees, but carbon sequestration occurs only in growing stands, not mature forests and is painfully slow. Mature forests hold huge carbon stores, so we don't want forest clearance. To address the current problem, however, we need to address the release of CO2 from our own actions. There, progress can be much quicker.
1 Recommendation
17th Jul, 2019
S N Mishra
Maharshi Dayanand University
Hence forest itself consistently remain green regrows so that co2 sink always remain higher
2 Recommendations
Not only individual trees, but many herbaceous plants including ferns and algae species; that live within the canopies of healthy forests, and in other healthy, biodiverse, ecosystems, have the ability to absorb pollutants. I agree with calls for using local species whenever possible for these purposes. Urban foresters as well as restoration ecologists, and landscapers would do well to consider what understory plants to include when planting trees. Understory plants, adapted to the moderating effects of the canopy on light and temperature are those most likely to succeed as house plants. NASA did a study on using several kinds of houseplants to absorb benzene, trichloroethylene, and formaldehyde. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19930073077.pdf There have also been studies on using plants to absorb pollutants from water and soils. These sinks for pollutants also need cleaning and cleaning them would reduce the likelihood of those pollutants being released into or returned to the air. Willows and sunflowers take up uranium contaminants in the presence of citric acid added to soil. This research leaves the consideration that the condition of soils, including PH, that any plant is growing in can affect its ability to uptake pollutants. The following paper has a good explanation of how plants take up and modify pollutants and lists several species that are good at it:
2 Recommendations
21st Jul, 2019
Md Moniruzzaman
Bangladesh Council of Scientific & Industrial Research Rajshahi Bangladesh
You know, Eicchornia spp. always grow densely in a single area and absorb more pollutant from the aquatic area moreover, CO2 from the environment. For this, Eicchornia embedded areas keep from pollution.
1 Recommendation
22nd Jul, 2019
Paul Reed Hepperly
University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez
David Dawson is right to suggest that reduced emissions are needed in our environmental climate concern but wrong in the assessment that tree and vegetation is insignificant as a source remediation. IPCC suggests that both sequestration and emission reduction are needed related to deceleration of climate change. Vegetation and soil management are very much about to stimulate very significant helpful carbon and nitrogen sequestration and help the overall balance of climate and environmental quality. I agree with Mr. Moniruzzaman in the assessment that plant communities are more effective than any single plant species and the importance of biodiversity. In a heating world a single tree can transpire over 1000 liters of water in a single day. The shade and cooling from the living tree is viable way of coping with many issues related to our warming environment it addressing the taking out of excess greenhouse gases while mitigating many of the worst issues related to global warming. In the context of global warming adaptation our abuse of our soil environment has led to impoverishment of soil organic matter levels by well over one half of the origin amount. The management of our vegetative cover along with vegetation give a viable way when combined with a transformed use of energy to address the existential issue of climate change from accelerated enrichment of our atmosphere with greenhouse gases.
3 Recommendations
24th Jul, 2019
Dewanand Makhan
Naturalis Biodiversity Center
If some plants and trees consume the maximum amount of polluted gases in the atmosphere you can eat the fruits and plants. Sorry you are wrong Virendra Kumar Saxena and why they eat Tulsi. Were is the poisoning?
3 Recommendations
25th Jul, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Devanand, I mean trees/ plant giving fresh air in the atmosphere.
1 Recommendation
25th Jul, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Miriam, appreciated your valuable remark.
1 Recommendation
26th Jul, 2019
Gnanasekaran .A
Annamalai University
Horse-chestnut, black walnut, American sweetgum, ponderosa pine, red pine, white pine, London plane, Hispaniolan pine, Douglas fir, scarlet oak, red oak, Virginia live oak, and bald cypress as examples of trees especially good at absorbing and storing CO2
3 Recommendations
26th Jul, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Following plants/trees may have capability to consume/absorb polluted gases :
Pine, Oake, Douglas, Neem, Peepal, Black walnut, Bamboo, Cassia, Banyan Matoe , Saga and many more.
1 Recommendation
15th Aug, 2019
Augustine Senanu Kukah
Western Sydney University
Great discussion. Following
15th Aug, 2019
Maria V. Kozlova
Lomonosov Moscow State University
I think the question must be considered also in terms of the plant metabolic rate (especially gas exchange in the stomata) of the certain plant species in the certain environmental conditions. The optimum pollutant consumption in the same species may vary. Thus, in various condition (i.e.climatic zone, etc.) different species (plant communities) provide maximum consumption. Even a 'good consumer' species could hardly do it well near the edge of its distribution area, in unfavorable conditions.
1 Recommendation
16th Aug, 2019
Ajit Seshadri
Vels University
The discussion on this question would lead to ideal concepts in landscapping.
Plants foliage apt for rapid absoption of CO2 may be used for spaces on sides of heavy traffic lanes at ground to 3m above level.
Trees and their leafage for levels 3m to 6m level or higher.
Indoor AQ improver plants for inner spaces.
Likewise, we could evolve a strategies for low and lower sunlight availability.
Corridor, tunnels in buildings, balconies and open terrace spaces may also be assessed for apt taxonomic inputs for carrying out bio-remediation.
Well wishes.
2 Recommendations
16th Aug, 2019
Augustine Senanu Kukah
Western Sydney University
I agree with you Maria V. Kozlova
1 Recommendation
16th Aug, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Fern tree
2 Recommendations
16th Aug, 2019
Nirmala S.V.S.G
Narayana Dental College and Hospital
Following plants/trees may have capability to consume/absorb polluted gases : Pine, Oake, Douglas, Neem, Peepal, Black walnut, Bamboo, Cassia, Banyan Matoe , Saga and many more.
2 Recommendations
18th Aug, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Banyan, peepal and neem trees.
1 Recommendation
19th Aug, 2019
Satvant kaur Saini
IORA ECOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS, NEW DELHI
Great discussion since long, and I find that tree species preference matters from the climatic zone and site suitability as many of the group members@@ have mentioned this. But overall observation shows that Neem, Peepal, Banyan are some of the common trees as far as the rate of pollutant absorbent is concerned.
19th Aug, 2019
Maria V. Kozlova
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Satvant kaur Saini That tree species are not very common in Taiga or Prarie for example =) Thus, you can't conclude this from the 'overall observation' . At least a broad geographic reference is needed.
19th Aug, 2019
S N Mishra
Maharshi Dayanand University
Increase the canopy by suitable species will reduce the presence of pollutants from atmospher and will increase oxygen concentration
24th Aug, 2019
Habib Karimipour
Shahid Beheshti University
all trees and plants can adsorb CO2 during photosynthesis process. But as Yogesh mentioned, some species including: Common Horse-chestnut, Black Walnut, American Sweetgum, Ponderosa Pine, Red Pine, White Pine, London Plane, Hispaniolan Pine, Douglas Fir, Scarlet Oak, Red Oak, Virginia Live Oak and Bald Cypress are known to be good adsorbents to capture CO2.
1 Recommendation
28th Aug, 2019
Robert Sacilotto
Botanique Stanardsville Virginia
Ideally, you should plant a quick-growing species which not only has good foliar exchange; it should produce a wood product which can be used to either sequester carbon, e.g. building material, or provide a means to reduce fossil fuel use, as in cellulosic alcohol.
Foliage dies and releases Co2 at night. A better measure is quick growth of secondary xylem, wood. Gram per gram, this will be the highest and most durable form of carbon capture, if the wood is not allowed to simply decay. Additionally, seek species which do not require fertilizer, such as those which fix nitrogen. Insect pest resistance is also important.
Ironically, it is often the case that imported, invasive species can accomplish superior sequestration due to their lack of natural controls and their rampant growth. In a program where escape is prevented and the non-native species already present in an area, it could be possible to, e.g. harvest before seed production and produce a carbon-captured product, such as particle board, from routinely harvested young trees. Young trees, as they build faster mass of secondary xylem, usually have a point where they attain more mass per year than older, mature trees.
It's far better, of course, to begin by examining native species and using those which best satisfy the above criteria. I mention the exotics because of personal experience. In our temperate climate, Ailanthus altissima is an invasive which we cut down and use to heat our home, negating the need for convention heat sources which are fossil fuel-driven.
29th Aug, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
If make attempt not to reduce the greenery will be a good contribution to the man kind/socienty.
29th Aug, 2019
Robert Sacilotto
Botanique Stanardsville Virginia
Of course, preserving whole forest ecosystems provides a tremendous diversity of pollutant breakdown or capture possibilities, as microorganisms associated with ecosystems can contribute to pollutant mitigation. Here, the constant genetic flux of bacteria, fungi, lichens, algae, etc. provide myriads of enzymes, biological pathways, which often drift towards utilization of available chemicals.
Which plants absorb or sequester the most pollutants will depend on identifying which pollutant(s) one is referring to. Sulfur Dioxide, for example, can be converted to Sulfates in soil or humus, which are then available for organisms to use. Co2 is, perhaps, one of the easiest pollutants to capture.
1 Recommendation
29th Aug, 2019
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Mostly greenery/ tall trees may consume polluted gases.
7th Feb, 2020
Juanette John
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa
In South Africa, we have the spekboom ( Portulacaria Afra) which has a significant carbon storage capacity.
7th Feb, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Tulsi, peepal, neem, palm tree, fern tree
4th Jun, 2020
Muhammad Ammar
University of the West of England, Bristol
Carbon offsetting via trees is an effective contributor but not the sole answer to rising air pollution. However its a fact that something is better than nothing.
The best of my knowledge,
1. Poplar tree with carbon offset rate of 7 tones/ha/year for a period of 26 years.
2. Conifer tree with carbon offset rate of 3 tones/ha/year for a period of 55 years.
3. Hardwood with carbon offset rate of 2 tones/ha/year for a period of 90 years.
Reference paper:
Cannell, M.G.R. (1999) Growing trees to sequester carbon in the UK: Answers to some common questions. Forestry. 72 (3), pp. 237–247. doi:10.1093/forestry/72.3.237.
2 Recommendations
7th Jun, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Protect plants and trees as to get good air.
7th Jun, 2020
Nyakno jimmy George
Akwa Ibom State University
Leavy and green vegetations absorb Carbon IV oxide and convert it to man's food
8th Jun, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Usually all plants consume pollutant gases.
13th Jun, 2020
Munira Nasiruddin
University of Chittagong
Plants absorb polluted gases and improve the air quality. Oak is the most carbon absorbing tree. The common horse chestnut is a good carbon absorber. Ficus religiosa (peepal tree) purifies the air most. Other trees included in the list are pine, maple, neem, banyan, Cassia and eucalyptus.
1 Recommendation
24th Jul, 2020
Harish Thakare
Navsari Agricultural University
Interesting questions Sir.......
Great discussion......
29th Jul, 2020
Ganga Devi
Anand Agricultural University
May be the tress like Banyan, peepal, neem are the main which absorb maximum pollution and many more also..............
3rd Aug, 2020
Jinda Jan-orn
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
I like snake plant because it is easy to grow, please see,
Wei, X., Lyu, S., Yu, Y., Wang, Z., Liu, H., Pan, D., and Chen, J. 2017. Phylloremediation of Air
Pollutants: Exploiting the Potential of Plant Leaves and Leaf-Associated Microbes. Front. Plant Sci. 8:1318. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2017.01318
Wolverton, B.C., Johnson, A., and Bounds, K. 1989. INTERIOR LANDSCAPE PLANTS FOR
INDOOR AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT. FINAL REPORT-SEPTEMBER 15, 1989. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, John C. Stennis Space Center, Missouri, USA.
3rd Aug, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Tulasi, peepal, neem, bargad, fern trees, ashok and many more .
1 Recommendation
10th Sep, 2020
Ricka Philippe
University of Strasbourg
Munira Nasiruddin thank you for your clear answer. Would you mind sharing your scientific sources ?
12th Sep, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Neem and bargad tree. This is best place for meditation.
17th Sep, 2020
Sapura Mohamad
Universiti Teknologi Malaysia
i believe plants that have more leaf area index that absorbs more pollutants...
1 Recommendation
13th Oct, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
In general dark green colour leaves of tall tree or small plant consume pollutant gases. A study showed, tulsi, pipal, bargad, various types of fern trees consume more polluted gases.
3 Recommendations
14th Oct, 2020
Pasupuleti Sivaramakrishna
Sri Venkateswara University
Plants with large amount of biomass such as Ficus religiosa, Ficus benghalensis, Sammanea samman, Albizzi lebbeck, Tamarindus indica, Ponamia pinnata etc are the best absorbers of polluted gases. They will be found to grow in all type of environments.
1 Recommendation
15th Oct, 2020
Francesco Mancini
Italian National Research Council
I think those species that Have the greatest leaf surface.
Anyway it is an interesting question in a climate change scenario
20th Oct, 2020
A K Shyam
NABET
There are plants listed in the literature for Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) - Where: A=Ascorbic acid content (mg/gm), T=Total chlorophyll (mg/gm), P=pH of the leaf extract, R=Relative water content of leaf. Generally, deciduous plants score over evergreen due to the periodic leaf shedding and the fresh foliage accounting for additional amounts of gaseous emissions. You may please browse through the literature, please.
4 Recommendations
21st Oct, 2020
Munira Nasiruddin
University of Chittagong
Oak is the most carbon absorbing plant. The common horse chestnut (Aesculus spp.) is also a good carbon absorber. Dracaena plants is one of the most efficient air filters. Peepal (Ficus religiosa) purifies air. Besides, pine, neem, bamboo. Cassia, banyan and Eucalyptus trees also absorb carbon from air.
1 Recommendation
22nd Oct, 2020
Nsekanabanga Jean D'Amour
University of Lay Adventists of Kigali
spekboom is the best carbon sink especially in sand soil
check the scientific source : Sarah-Jane Paviour wrote on it in her 2014 thesis on properties of spekboom.
22nd Oct, 2020
Santosh Madhale
Shri. Yashwantrao Pati Science College, Solankur
The plants with large canopy and high biomass are having the capacity to absorb more polluted gases present in that environment. The plants like Pine, Oake, Douglas, Neem, Peepal, Black walnut, Bamboo, Cassia, Banyan Matoe , Saga and many more. Banyan, peepal and neem trees are more useful in absorbing higher amount of polluted gases.
23rd Oct, 2020
A K Shyam
NABET
It is not the canopy that is important but, the nature - deciduous or Evergreen. Further, pines in my opinion do not account for gasesous absorption because of its nature - there are not leaves but needles, please.
1 Recommendation
23rd Oct, 2020
Pasupuleti Sivaramakrishna
Sri Venkateswara University
Instead of canopy, the type of forests and the types of plants are important in absorbing the pollutants present in the atmosphere. Deciduous plants are considered the better plants to absorb large amount of pollutants. This view is according to my knowledge.
28th Oct, 2020
Ali Alhayany
University of Diyala
I think that evergreen forest trees with large biomass can consume the largest amounts of polluted gases.
28th Oct, 2020
Augustine Senanu Kukah
Western Sydney University
I agree with Ali Alhayany
1 Recommendation
29th Oct, 2020
Eric Kwame Ahiabu
University for Development Studies
I am of the same opinion as the points made by YOGESH CHANDRA TRIPATHI
29th Oct, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Neem, fern , pipal, tulsi, bargad
Are well known for consuming polluted gases.
29th Oct, 2020
Paul Reed Hepperly
University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez
If we consider the increase of greenhouse gases as pollutant the ability of plants to capture and maintain carbon transferring it to a long term soil reserve is critical. The ability to generate humus is the critical function. Soil organic matter is able to help the gaseous environment but is also cirtical to water relations and the ability to buffer soil toxicity. The velvetbean plant is highly effectivie in increasing soil organic matter it can do this based on the high l dopa content that is not easily decayed. Mexican sunflower is another stellar plant in stimulating the ability to increase soil organic matter in short time frames. When soil organic matter is acheived in the soil the increases of toxicity are ameliorated and the most growth facter water is attenuated.
30th Oct, 2020
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Because of fast urbanisation, such trees are disappearing. Scope for polluted gases becoming more.
30th Oct, 2020
Sarri Djamel
Université de M'sila
i propose Nerium oleander r
30th Oct, 2020
Mark Biagi
Vision Marine Consulting
The best way to quickly adsorb CO2 from the atmosphere and lock it up in biology is through the stimulus of massive algal blooms in the oceans. Yes I know that this is a controversial topic, but it is the best and less expensive way of doing it. I have read most of the critics and the truth about their comments is that they don't understand the issue. Many have said that they are not in favour of "Geoengineering", bu we have geoengineering the planet for centuries with the dumping of CO2 into the atmosphere. I have heard may arguments against this technique, but nonviable solution to the problem. I have read about artificial trees, spinning mirrors into space around the earth, injecting sulphur dioxide high into the atmosphere, etc. etc., but none of there are practical, controllable or even economically feasible. Yes there have been some false starts, some unscrupulous players trying to profit by this, and frankly mountains of fear. It is time to revisit this initiative. Please remember that 50-65% of the oxygen we breath comes from the oceans, and it is produced by plankton.
1 Recommendation
13th Nov, 2020
Tadesse Weyuma
Kotebe Metropolitan University Ethiopia
I think Veit-ver grass and elephant grass were best Pollutant absorbents
1 Recommendation
15th Nov, 2020
Aseel M.H. Hatif
University of Baghdad
I read some interesting studies on buttonwood plant as a bio monitor
31st Mar, 2021
Monicah Elizabeth
UGANDA NATIONAL ROADS AUTHORITY
Mango trees are on record for being super absorbers. The challenge with mangoes comes during processing and transportation.
31st Mar, 2021
Bara Mouslim
Université 8 mai 1945 - Guelma
Many plants are used for purification, and also many plants are used as indecator for quality of environment.
See this doc very interessting!
Good luck
1 Recommendation
31st Mar, 2021
Virendra Kumar Saxena
National Geophysical Research Institute
Fern tree, peepal, neem, bargad,
Tulsi, money plant and many others. Ingeneral greenery is good option.
1 Recommendation
7th Apr, 2021
Firza Shafique
University of Education, Lahore
Oryza sativa is a good iron accumylator
1 Recommendation

Similar questions and discussions

How can environmental protection and biodiversity be improved by using current ecological technologies?
Discussion
1364 replies
  • Dariusz ProkopowiczDariusz Prokopowicz
Due to the current civilization progress in recent decades, acceleration of the development of industry, automotive, urban agglomerations, intensification of agricultural production, etc. and related greenhouse gas emissions, global warming, ozone layer depletion in the atecologicalecologicalmosphere, increase of environmental pollution, growing problem of smog in urban agglomerations, the increase in pollution of the seas and oceans to which unsorted waste is thrown away is cut out as part of the predatory economy of tropical forests in the Amazon and other largest natural forest ecosystems.
In addition, the secondary effect of global warming of the Earth's climate is the increasing, more frequent weather anomalies, including drought, leading to steppe and desertification of areas that were previously natural forest ecosystems or areas exploited by agriculture.
As a result of the above-mentioned processes, every year many species of flora and fauna disappear forever.
As a result, natural biodiversity diminishes, which for millions of years evolved evolutionally on Earth.
In this way the natural resources of the planet Earth are irretrievably in decline.
In view of the above, the issue of environmental protection and biodiversity is one of the most important challenges of humanity in the 21st century.
Classical economics must change towards a green economy based on the strategy of sustainable pro-ecological development.
Therefore, I am asking you for the following query:
How can environmental protection and biodiversity be improved by using current ecological technologies?
Please, answer, comments.
I invite you to the discussion.
Best wishes
Is it time we shift emphasis from technological solutions to climate change & focus on the 'Human Dimension'?
Question
5980 answers
  • Raveendra Nath YasarapuRaveendra Nath Yasarapu
Isn't the obvious solution and the elephant-in-the-room 'BETTER HUMAN BEINGS'? Shouldn't the focus be on better human beings rather than better technology? Why is it that everyone wants to develop better technology rather than focus on better humanity? Because no one has the answers and no one wants to change themselves? In environmental degradation, is it not obvious that nature can heal itself, if only left alone, and it is we humans who need regulation? Many natural parks managers do just that; seal off the area from human interference to let nature heal and recover. It is classified as 'Strict Nature Reserve"by IUCN. Complacency and inaction are not advocated here, as many have misunderstood, but the shifting of focus from technology to the human being. As technology is no match for human greed, isn't introspection & restraining ourselves more relevant than developing more technology, which caused the mess in the first place, by making it easy for a few to consume more? Since technology is only a short term quick fix which fails after a short time, isn't the real problem our addiction to material consumption & our lack of understanding about human nature? Isn't developing more technology sustaining the addiction instead of correcting it, leading to more complex problems later on, needing more complex technological quick fixes like higher drug dosages, more ground troops & equipment, (along with their debilitating side effects) in the future? Isn't this the vicious addiction circle we are trapped in? As researchers, do we merely buy more time with technology OR go to the very root of the problem, the human being?
A lot of hue and cry is made about climate change and the environment in general. Public and private money is poured into research to study its effects on the environment, sustainability etc. Should we study nature or ourselves?
" Our studies must begin with our selves and not with the heavens. "-Ouspensky
Human activities have been found to have a direct correlation to climate change and its impact on the environment(I=P x A x T, the Ehrlich and Holdren equation), in spite of what some complacent sections say to protect their own self interests.
We hardly know about Human nature. We can scarcely predict human behavior. We need to find out why we think like we do and why we do what we do and why, in spite of all knowledge and wisdom, consume more than what we need, in the form of addictions to consumption and imbalance not only ourselves but also the family, society and environment around us..
Humanity is directly responsible for all the unnatural imbalances occurring on the planet. Yet we refuse to take responsibility and instead focus on climate change, or fool the public exchequer with a 'breakthrough in renewable energy just around the corner'. We scarcely know what drives human beings. If we had known, all the imbalances around us would have had solutions by now, given the amount of money plowed into finding such solutions. Are we blindly groping in the dark of climate change because we don't know the answers to our own nature?
Is it not high time we focus on what makes us human, correct our consumptive behavior and leave nature to take care of climate change? Why focus effort on 'externals' when the problem is 'internal'- 'me'?
Aren't we addicts denying our addiction and blaming everything else but ourselves?
" We are what we Think.
All that we are arises with our thoughts.
With our thoughts, we make the world." - Buddha 
IMHO, We don't need to save the World. It is enough if we save ourselves from ourselves. The need of the hour is not vain glorious interventions, but self-restraint and self-correction!
The Mind is the Final frontier.
Scientists Support Ukraine
Discussion
Be the first to reply
  • Ijad MadischIjad Madisch
Like so many, I am shocked and saddened at seeing war break out in Europe. My thoughts – and those of the ResearchGate team – are with the people of Ukraine and everyone affected.
ResearchGate is an international company, whose purpose is to enable scientists across the world to work together openly and collaboratively, regardless of borders or nationality. We have people from over 40 countries on our staff of around 200, and being based in Berlin, we are profoundly aware of the human cost of conflicts, the echoes of which have shaped and scarred our home city. We join with the international community in condemning the actions of the Russian state.
We have been asking ourselves: What can we do?
From today, we will offer free advertising space worth $2.5 million on our network to humanitarian organizations working to respond to the crisis. ResearchGate benefits from over 50 million visitors every month, and we hope this initiative can help raise funds and awareness for those organizations that are having direct impact and need support.
We also want to use our platform to highlight the response from the scientific community. Personally, I have found the messages of support from scientists everywhere to be truly heartfelt, and I would like to highlight some of the community initiatives I’ve seen here:
Additionally, I’m posting here some of the organizations responding to the crisis and actively soliciting donations:
To help gather more support for these initiatives, please consider sharing this post further (you don’t need a ResearchGate account to see it), and I will continue to update it with other initiatives as I find them. You can also click “Recommend” below to help others in your ResearchGate network see it. And if you know of any other community initiatives that we can share here please let us know via this form: https://forms.gle/e37EHouWXFLyhYE8A
-Ijad Madisch, CEO & Co-Founder of ResearchGate
-----
Update 03/07:
This list outlines country-level initiatives from various academic institutions and research organizations, with a focus on programs and sponsorship for Ukrainian researchers:
Should patronymic naming be banned from biological nomenclature via the 'Code'?
Discussion
33 replies
  • Theodor C. H. ColeTheodor C. H. Cole
BIOPAT e.V., for example, offers to name new species at wish for a donation of at least 2600 Euros (who do these organisms 'belong to'?). One can dedicate a scholarly work, as a book or journal article, to a person – but a living organism? Wouldn't it be preferable to adhere to the common practice of allocating descriptive names and to ban anthropocentric patronymic names and 'graveyard taxonomy' from biological nomenclature via the 'Code'!

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